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November's Fury: The Deadly Great Lakes…
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November's Fury: The Deadly Great Lakes Hurricane of 1913 (vuoden 2014 painos)

– tekijä: Michael Schumacher (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
395513,932 (3.65)1
On Thursday, November 6, the Detroit News forecasted "moderate to brisk"winds for the Great Lakes. On Friday, the Port Huron Times-Herald predicted a "moderately severe"storm. Hourly the warnings became more and more dire. Weather forecasting was in its infancy, however, and radio communication was not much better; by the time it became clear that a freshwater hurricane of epic proportions was developing, the storm was well on its way to becoming the deadliest in Great Lakes maritime history.The ultimate story of man versus nature, November's Fury recounts the dramatic events that unfolded over those four days in 1913, as captains eager--or at times forced--to finish the season tried to outrun the massive storm that sank, stranded, or demolished dozens of boats and claimed the lives of more than 250 sailors. This is an account of incredible seamanship under impossible conditions, of inexplicable blunders, heroic rescue efforts, and the sad aftermath of recovering bodies washed ashore and paying tribute to those lost at sea. It is a tragedy made all the more real by the voices of men--now long deceased--who sailed through and survived the storm, and by a remarkable array of photographs documenting the phenomenal damage this not-so-perfect storm wreaked.The consummate storyteller of Great Lakes lore, Michael Schumacher at long last brings this violent storm to terrifying life, from its first stirrings through its slow-mounting destructive fury to its profound aftereffects, many still felt to this day.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Anne.Hoffman
Teoksen nimi:November's Fury: The Deadly Great Lakes Hurricane of 1913
Kirjailijat:Michael Schumacher (Tekijä)
Info:Univ Of Minnesota Press (2014), Edition: Reprint, 216 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
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November's Fury: The Deadly Great Lakes Hurricane of 1913 (tekijä: Michael Schumacher)

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näyttää 5/5
November's Fury: The Deadly Great Lakes Hurricane of 1913 by Michael Schumacher presents a detailed account of the worst storm on the Great Lakes in recorded history. Michael Schumacher is the author of several books including The Mighty Fitz: The Sinking of the Edmund Fitzgerald. Biographical information on the author is scarce, but his other books include biographies of Allen Ginsberg and Eric Clapton among others.

From November 7th through November 11th a perfect storm swept though the Great Lakes region. Two major storm fronts converged over the region of warm water creating hurricane force winds and blinding snow storms and huge waves. The city of Cleveland was isolated from the rest of the world as the storm knocked out electrical and communications lines. On the waters of the Great Lakes, over 250 sailors would lose their lives as 40 ships were damaged. Among the damaged ships 12 sank and five have yet to be found.

It is hard to believe today that so many ships could be lost in a storm. The Great Lakes are no where near the size of the Gulf of Mexico or the oceans where hurricanes form. The ships on the Great Lakes hauling ore and coal were 400 – 550 feet long. These ships are huge for freshwater shipping and looking at them, its unimaginable that they could sink in a storm. This was before radar, GPS, and storm tracking. Granted the weather service did issue warnings a combination of hubris, greed, and bad planning caused a large loss of life. For the residents of Cleveland there was little that could be done. Winter storms and lake effect snow are expected yearly, however, he severity cannot prevented or at that time accurately anticipated.

Cleveland lay in white and mighty solitude, mute and death to the outside world, a city of lonesome snowiness, storm swept from end to end – The Cleveland Plain Dealer

I grew up in Cleveland and studied Cleveland history in grade school, but don't recall the reading about the storm of November 1913. We were aware or the shipping dangers of Great Lakes and lake effect storms. I am old enough to remember when the Edmund Fitzgerald sank in a storm on Lake Superior. Even 60 years more modern than the ships lost in 1913 and it immense size of 729 feet, it too could not stand up to the punishment the Great Lakes can dish out. This is a tragedy that hopefully can be avoided in the future with current storm tracking and navigation technology.

November's Fury is well written and tells an amazing story. At times it is hard to believe that you are reading non-fiction. The damage storm and loss of life seem beyond anything experienced real life. Schumacher weaves together the individual accounts of each ship into a compelling story. There are courageous acts as well as foolish acts (which many were just standard procedure at the time) as well. This book is a valuable history and recommended to those interested in maritime history or the Great Lakes. ( )
  evil_cyclist | Mar 16, 2020 |
Could have really told the story with some umph, but lot of repetitive words and phrases such as "never to be seen again." Interesting topic, lack of execution in the writing. ( )
  Jacobflaws | Jan 20, 2015 |
"If ever there was a ‘perfect storm’ on the Great Lakes, it would be the one that pounded the lakes from November 7 through November 10, 1913, leaving a wake of destruction unlike anything ever seen on fresh water at any point in recorded history. By the time the storm had blown out of the region, twelve boats had sunk, thirty-one more had been grounded on rocks and beaches, and dozens more severely damaged. More than 250 men lost their lives. Eight boats, with their entire crews, were lost in a single day on Lake Huron alone."

Thus begins the Introduction to author Michael Schumacher’s book, November’s Fury which gives a fascinating account of the storm. Along with details of the ships and the fury of the storm, Schumacher gives us several individual stories including one about a sailor who had a premonition about the storm and walked away thus saving his life, another who was saved when he was left behind after going ashore to cash a money order, and one young man who had switched boats at the last minute - he arrived home just as his funeral was being held. It was thanks to these and other survivors that many of the bodies which washed ashore were identified. Sadly, identification was made more difficult by looters and several bodies were never identified.

Published by the University of Minnesota Press, which calls it, ‘the ultimate story of man versus nature’ and accompanied by dozens of photographs of the ships effected by the storm, this is a detailed and well-researched account of this deadly storm and its aftermath. For anyone with an interest in marine history, I can’t recommend it highly enough. ( )
  lostinalibrary | Dec 14, 2013 |
One hundred years ago as I write this, the most destructive storm in Great Lakes’ history began its attack on the area.

It was hardly the first or most famous storm to wrack the area. Explorer Rene-Robert Sieur de LaSalle constructed the first European boat to sail Lake Huron and lost it in a storm the same year. And, of course, singer Gordon Lightfoot immortalized the November storm that sunk the Edmund Fitzgerald (subject of another Schumacher book). The 1913 storm blasted the Great Lakes from November 7th through November 10th of 1913, killing over two hundred people on land and water.

The center of Schumacher’s book is a chronological account of the storm as it swept west to east, two storm centers meeting to become a “white hurricane”. He follows the fate of several ships, survivors and the doomed. Sticking to that chronology accounts for the book’s only weakness. Sometimes hopping from ship to ship gets a bit confusing.

It is not just a story of sailors, though. There are the families who had to travel from morgue to morgue to identify the dead, the storm’s assault on Cleveland. There are mysteries: a long sunk ship pulled up from the bottom by the storm, an unknown capsized ship, a dead seaman wearing the life preserver of a ship sunk miles away from his own. There are poignant messages scrawled by men about to die (or maybe the notes are just cruel hoaxes). A man attends, while living, his own wake. The bodies of the dead wash ashore and are looted.

Schumacher frames his story by summarizing the state of Great Lakes nautical commerce in 1913. Radios were available but largely unused – ship captains regarded them as tools for owners to interfere with their command. He also makes a brief detour to talk about another deadly November storm, the one of 1905. It was the one that produced the famous wreck of the Mataafa in Duluth Harbor, nine men dying of exposure 700 feet from shore while 10,000 watched. The story doesn’t really end until 2000 when one of the ships lost in the storm is finally found.

Schumacher throws in plenty of extras: a glossary of nautical terms, an appendix of boats lost or stranded in the storm, and maps of the Great Lakes.

The bibliography would suggest there is little new here in basic information. However, I doubt many books on Great Lakes storms and wrecks have been so lavishly illustrated with photos and the occasional sunken wreck painting. And these are not just file photos of the ships before the storm. There are photos taken during and after the storm as well.

The combination of clear writing and plentiful pictures makes this a worthy introduction to this bit of history, and I suspect even long time students of the event will appreciate this book too. ( )
  RandyStafford | Nov 7, 2013 |
A compelling history of the most violent storm to hit the Great Lakes. It happened in 1919 and sunk many ships. This a must read for those interested in Great Lakes history.
  GypsyJon | Oct 27, 2013 |
näyttää 5/5
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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On Thursday, November 6, the Detroit News forecasted "moderate to brisk"winds for the Great Lakes. On Friday, the Port Huron Times-Herald predicted a "moderately severe"storm. Hourly the warnings became more and more dire. Weather forecasting was in its infancy, however, and radio communication was not much better; by the time it became clear that a freshwater hurricane of epic proportions was developing, the storm was well on its way to becoming the deadliest in Great Lakes maritime history.The ultimate story of man versus nature, November's Fury recounts the dramatic events that unfolded over those four days in 1913, as captains eager--or at times forced--to finish the season tried to outrun the massive storm that sank, stranded, or demolished dozens of boats and claimed the lives of more than 250 sailors. This is an account of incredible seamanship under impossible conditions, of inexplicable blunders, heroic rescue efforts, and the sad aftermath of recovering bodies washed ashore and paying tribute to those lost at sea. It is a tragedy made all the more real by the voices of men--now long deceased--who sailed through and survived the storm, and by a remarkable array of photographs documenting the phenomenal damage this not-so-perfect storm wreaked.The consummate storyteller of Great Lakes lore, Michael Schumacher at long last brings this violent storm to terrifying life, from its first stirrings through its slow-mounting destructive fury to its profound aftereffects, many still felt to this day.

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