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Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom,…
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Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the… (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2013; vuoden 2015 painos)

– tekijä: Robin Wall Kimmerer (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,2394211,577 (4.54)58
"An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--"As a leading researcher in the field of biology, Robin Wall Kimmerer understands the delicate state of our world. But as an active member of the Potawatomi nation, she senses and relates to the world through a way of knowing far older than any science. In Braiding Sweetgrass, she intertwines these two modes of awareness--the analytic and the emotional, the scientific and the cultural--to ultimately reveal a path toward healing the rift that grows between people and nature. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen"--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:oceanview
Teoksen nimi:Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants
Kirjailijat:Robin Wall Kimmerer (Tekijä)
Info:Milkweed Editions (2015), Edition: First Paperback, 408 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:305.897 Kimmerer Braiding

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teachings of Plants (tekijä: Robin Wall Kimmerer) (2013)

Viimeisimmät tallentajatmogwit, Pugliese-Huggins, yksityinen kirjasto, Eschwa, false-knight, ohlonelibrary, AnthonyMcCann, wraithqueens, Aglassman
  1. 10
    The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World (tekijä: David Abram) (SonoranDreamer)
    SonoranDreamer: Both books are about seeing the world in ways we don't usually pay attention to.
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 42) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Both a shameful reckoning and a hopeful emergence, in essence this writing presents a perspective that is at odds with our horse-blinkered, materialistic culture's views of the natural world. The perspective is not one of an idealistic utopia, but rather one of respectful coexistence with all life, and balance with the natural world that in providing a conducive environment is essential for our existence — one of honest appreciation for the gifts that enable being, and of meaningful reciprocity to further the continuum of all life. This from a merging of Native American perspective and hard science, which I find more credible in intent and practicality than Janus-faced offerings of our money-grubbing, destructive mores. [You might find the allegorical chapter, Windigo Footprints, telling in its succinctness, and the allegorical chapter, Defeating Windigo, instructive.] Together with the beneficial evidence of following this path is the hard evidence of how at our hand so far our little blue canoe is changing at an accelerating rate, which has the potential of leaving us behind in like haste. To me, it is unadulterated hubris to ignore Nature's sway and the diminishing circle of life that supports our being.

Each chapter builds on the premise with accomplished writing to further evidence the perspective, and increase one's understanding of the circle of life, which results in a longish book. To those with a like understanding it may seem overdone, and to those in denial it may be exasperating in exposing the ignorance of our materialistic tainted erudition. In my view, the thoroughness and accuracy of the book are necessary to enlighten those desiring a better understanding of practicable mitigation of the consequences of our increasing biosphere plight.

I found this a meaningful and heartwarming work of literature. If only more had such wisdom and respect for the little blue canoe that gives us life. Finding it difficult to discover books that I consider meaningful and thought provoking, and that I haven't yet read, I'm thankful I came across this one. Thank you Robin Wall Kimmerer for this honest, articulate, and insightful rendering of how humankind could be a beneficial component of Earth's biosphere.

In grateful receiving, unasked giving, and caring, the heart grows. In taking, keeping, and wasting, the heart shrivels. The fire of life may seemingly have all the fuel in place to blaze, but without the spark of true wisdom it won't sustain your inner being. ( )
  LGCullens | Jun 1, 2021 |
A deeply thoughtful book about the way we think about and treat the planet, and how to repair the relationship between humans and nature.

See also: Lab Girl by Hope Jahren, A Mind Spread Out on the Ground by Alicia Elliott

Quotes

Plant blindness and its relative, species loneliness, impedes the recognition of the green world as a garden of gifts. The cycle flows from attention, to gift, to gratitude, to reciprocity. It starts with seeing. (xii)

A whole new ecosystem rises to replace that which no longer works in a changed world. (xv)

What does it take to abandon what does not work and take the risks of uncertainty. (xvii)

...a pharmacopoeia of healing stories that allow us to imagine a different relationship, in which people and land are good medicine for each other. (xx)

For all of us, becoming Indigenous to a place means living as if your children's future mattered, to take care of the land as if our lives, both material and spiritual, depended on it. (Skywoman Falling, 9)

As unpredictable as life may be, we have even less control over the stories they tell about us after we're gone. (The Council of Pecans, 12)

But we make a grave error if we try to separate individual well-being from the health of the whole. (16)

[The expression "Indian giver"] derives from a fascinating cross-cultural misinterpretation between an Indigenous culture operating in a gift economy and a colonial culture predicated on the concept of private property....Many of our ancient teachings counsel that whatever we have been given is supposed to be given away again...gifts are not free. The essence of the gift is that it creates a set of relationships. The currency of a gift economy is, at its root, reciprocity. (The Gift of Strawberries, 27-28) (rights vs responsibilities)

Ceremonies large and small have the power to focus attention to a way of living awake in the world. (An Offering, 35)

The world has a way of guiding your steps. (Asters and Goldenrod, 42)

...one half of the truth is that the earth endows us with great gifts, the other half is that the gift alone is not enough...the other half belongs to us; we participate in its transformation. (Maple Sugar Moon, 67)

Imagine raising children in a culture in which gratitude is the first priority....
...while expressing gratitude seems innocent enough, it is a revolutionary idea. In a consumer society, contentment is a radical proposition. Recognizing abundance rather than scarcity undermines an economy that thrives by creating unmet desires. Gratitude cultivates an ethic of fullness, but the economy needs emptiness. The Thanksgiving Address reminds you that you already have everything you need. (Allegiance to Gratitude, 107)

...when individuals flourish, so does the whole. (The Three Sisters, 130)

...the tradition of the Honorable Harvest: take only what you need and use everything you take.... "Use it up, wear it out, make it to, or do without" is an ethic both economical and ecological. (Wisgaak Gokpenagen: A Black Ash Basket, 144)

...ecosystem services...go unaccounted for in the human economy...we don't think about them unless they are missing. (Maple Nation: A Citizenship Guide, 165)

Not everything should be convenient. (The Honorable Harvest, 173)

The teachings tell us that a harvest is made honorable by what you give in return for what you take. (188)

"All powers have two sides, the power to create and the power to destroy. We must recognize them both, but invest our gifts on the side of creation." (Benton-Banai, In the Footsteps of Nanabozho: Becoming Indigenous to Place, 206)

This is our work, to discover what we can give. Isn't this the purpose of education, to learn the nature of your own gifts and how to use them for good in the world? (Sitting in a Circle, 232)

Ceremony focuses attention so that attention becomes intention. If you stand together and profess a thing before your community, it holds you accountable. (Burning Cascade Head, 242)

When a language dies, so much more than words are lost. Language is the dwelling place of ideas that do not exist anywhere else. It is a prism through which to see the world. (Putting Down Roots, 251)

Losing a plant can threaten a culture in much the same way as losing a language. (253)

We are dreaming of a time when the land might give thanks for the people. (255)

The pioneers produce a community based on the principles of unlimited growth, sprawl, and high energy consumption...When resources begin to run short...cooperation and strategies that promote stability...will be favored by evolution. (Old-Growth Children, 276)

Time as objective reality has never made much sense to me. It's what happens that matters....When you have all the time in the world, you can spend it, not on going somewhere, but on being where you are. (Witness to the Rain, 287)

It is the Windigo way that tricks us into believing that belongings will fill our hunger, when it is belonging that we crave. (Windigo Footprints, 300)

...every single treaty was broken...
The people have endured the pain of being bystanders to the degradation of their lands, but they never surrendered their caregiving responsibilities. (The Sacred and the Superfund, 309)

In the face of blind injustice, how do we continue? How do we live our responsibility for healing? (313)

We are deluged by information regarding our destruction of the world and hear almost nothing about how to nurture it. (318)

Restoration is a powerful antidote to despair. (319)

As the perpetrators...are we not bound to heal the wounds that we inflict? (Collateral Damage, 348)

The market system artificially creates scarcity by blocking the flow between the source and the consumer...The very earth that sustains us is being destroyed to fuel injustice. (Defeating Windigo, 366)

Wealth among traditional people is measured by having enough to give away....Both the honor of giving and the humility of receiving are necessary halves of the equation....We dance in a circle, not a line. (Epilogue: Returning the Gift, 372)

Imagine that while our neighbors were holding a giveaway, someone broke into their home to take whatever he wanted. We would be outraged at the moral trespass. So it should be for the earth. The earth gives away for free the power of wind and sun and water, but instead we break open the earth to take fossil fuels. Had we taken only that which is given to us, had we reciprocated the gift, we would not have to fear our own atmosphere today. (374) ( )
  JennyArch | May 23, 2021 |
3.25 stars

The author is an Indigenous woman who studied botany, so she learned our white scientific ways to study and research. But she combines that with everything she learned while growing up Indigenous – the traditional “ways of knowing”, specifically with regards to trees, plants, nature.

I love the philosophy that nature is so much more than white people (and scientists) give it credit for. I can’t even explain, but I really did agree with most of what she described. I listened to the audio (read by the author) and I did lose focus at various parts, so I did miss some of it. But there were plenty of other interesting things mentioned/explained that I enjoyed listening to. ( )
  LibraryCin | May 3, 2021 |
Kimmerer is a Native American botanist, and in this book she reconciles her training in European science and botany with her Native American heritage to provide a scientific and spiritual appreciation of nature. She describes the Native American understanding of the relationship between humans and plants.

This is a beautiful book. It combines memoir, history, botany, ethnography, and spirituality to describe a very different way of thinking about the world. The Native American relationship to nature is one of reciprocity, not dominance, of working with nature to achieve common goals instead of subverting it to our needs. Kimmerer celebrates the beauty and utility of nature, and sees plants as teachers and guardians. If we all thought about nature this way, the world would be a very different place.

It's worth reading this book slowly, and taking time to think about what she has to say. Now that I have read it once, I would like to re-read individual essays on a regular basis because there is so much to think about and absorb. ( )
  Gwendydd | May 1, 2021 |
I'll listen to this again. ( )
  KittyCunningham | Apr 26, 2021 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 42) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)

» Lisää muita tekijöitä (1 mahdollinen)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Kimmerer, Robin Wallensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Hughes, CindyKansikuvataiteilijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Kuhnz, ConnieSuunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Speaker, Mary AustinKannen suunnittelijamuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
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For all the Keepers of the Fire
my parents
my daughters
and my grandchildren
yet to join us in this beautiful place
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Hold out your hands and let me lay upon them a sheaf of freshly picked sweetgrass, loose and flowing, like newly washed hair.
She fell like a maple seed, pirouetting on an autumn breeze.
[Preface] Hold out your hands and let me lay upon them a sheaf of freshly picked sweetgrass, loose and flowing, like newly washed hair.
Sitaatit
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (1)

"An inspired weaving of indigenous knowledge, plant science, and personal narrative from a distinguished professor of science and a Native American whose previous book, Gathering Moss, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing. As a botanist and professor of plant ecology, Robin Wall Kimmerer has spent a career learning how to ask questions of nature using the tools of science. As a Potawatomi woman, she learned from elders, family, and history that the Potawatomi, as well as a majority of other cultures indigenous to this land, consider plants and animals to be our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these two lenses of knowing together to reveal what it means to see humans as "the younger brothers of creation." As she explores these themes she circles toward a central argument: the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgement and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the world. Once we begin to listen for the languages of other beings, we can begin to understand the innumerable life-giving gifts the world provides us and learn to offer our thanks, our care, and our own gifts in return"--"As a leading researcher in the field of biology, Robin Wall Kimmerer understands the delicate state of our world. But as an active member of the Potawatomi nation, she senses and relates to the world through a way of knowing far older than any science. In Braiding Sweetgrass, she intertwines these two modes of awareness--the analytic and the emotional, the scientific and the cultural--to ultimately reveal a path toward healing the rift that grows between people and nature. The woven essays that construct this book bring people back into conversation with all that is green and growing; a universe that never stopped speaking to us, even when we forgot how to listen"--

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