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The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story…
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The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win… (vuoden 2014 painos)

– tekijä: Denise Kiernan (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,436689,644 (3.65)77
In this book the author traces the story of the unsung World War II workers in Oak Ridge, Tennessee through interviews with dozens of surviving women and other Oak Ridge residents. This is the story of the young women of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, who unwittingly played a crucial role in one of the most significant moments in U.S. history. The Tennessee town of Oak Ridge was created from scratch in 1942. One of the Manhattan Project's secret cities, it did not appear on any maps until 1949, and yet at the height of World War II it was using more electricity than New York City and was home to more than 75,000 people, many of them young women recruited from small towns across the South. Their jobs were shrouded in mystery, but they were buoyed by a sense of shared purpose, close friendships, and a surplus of handsome scientists and Army men. But against this wartime backdrop, a darker story was unfolding. The penalty for talking about their work, even the most innocuous details, was job loss and eviction. One woman was recruited to spy on her coworkers. They all knew something big was happening at Oak Ridge, but few could piece together the true nature of their work until the bomb "Little Boy" was dropped over Hiroshima, Japan, and the secret was out. The shocking revelation: the residents of Oak Ridge were enriching uranium for the atomic bomb. Though the young women originally believed they would leave Oak Ridge after the war, many met husbands there, made lifelong friends, and still call the seventy-year-old town home. The reverberations from their work there, work they did not fully understand at the time, are still being felt today.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Dano36
Teoksen nimi:The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II
Kirjailijat:Denise Kiernan (Tekijä)
Info:Atria Books (2014), Edition: Reprint, 416 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
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Teoksen tarkat tiedot

The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II (tekijä: Denise Kiernan)

  1. 00
    Secret City (tekijä: Julia Watts) (lemontwist)
    lemontwist: It's pretty clear that Julia Watts read The Girls of Atomic City before writing Secret City.
  2. 00
    The Green Glass Sea (tekijä: Ellen Klages) (jillian0128)
  3. 00
    White Sands, Red Menace (tekijä: Ellen Klages) (jillian0128)
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Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 68) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
In 1942, construction began on Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The town was different than any other in the state. The facility built there and housing for thousands of employees surrounding it was related to one of the most secret projects of World War II -- The Manhattan Project. The work done at Oak Ridge was so secret that employees were not allowed to discuss their work, the facility or anything about the town with anyone -- even other employees or family members. They had no idea what they were working on....they just reported for work, did as they were told and went home again. In reality, they were helping develop the first nuclear bombs.....the bombs that exploded over Japan, destroying two cities, causing that nation's surrender.

Thousands of people lived in Oak Ridge. They rode buses from the housing areas to the facility and back home again. Shifts went around the clock. The pay was excellent, so most were happy to have the job. Nobody wanted to risk being fired. There could be someone listening or watching at any time. Those who spoke out of turn or acted suspiciously would be fired and escorted outside the fence immediately. Despite the restrictions, those who lived and worked at Oak Ridge learned to socialize, form friendships, and survive the war. Many of the employees at the facility were women, and they made significant contributions to the war effort.

This is a non-fiction book detailing the experiences of several women who lived at Oak Ridge. It details what their daily lives and jobs were like. At work, they often sat adjusting controls, monitoring dials, and recording data without knowing what any of it really meant. They just knew they were supporting the war effort and their family members who were overseas fighting. And after work they had to deal with rationing, factory housing, segregation and other problems.....in addition to not being able to discuss any work related topics at all with anybody.

I loved this book! The stories were fascinating to me. I enjoyed reading about the secret aspects of their work, and the way the war impacted their daily lives. They had to learn to re-use many items that were unavailable because of the war. For example, during the war, lipstick was packaged in flimsy cardboard tubes instead of metal because the factory that made the metal tubes had been reassigned to war related items. So, the women would scrape lipstick out of a cardboard tube into a pan and melt it down, then pour it into a metal tube that had been carefully saved.

Black workers faced racism. Black workers at Oak Ridge lived in hutments and trailers while white workers had nicer accommodations. Black married couples were not allowed to live together, but were separated into men and women only areas. White married couples were allowed to share a home.

I can't imagine working a job so secret that I couldn't be allowed to know or really understand my own job, or the work of friends, family members or even my spouse. It is amazing what they endured and what they produced, terrible though it was.

Before reading this book, [;ease understand that it is non-fiction and not a "story.'' The information is interesting and fascinating to read for those interested in history, The Manhattan Project, or the role of women in World War II. Those looking for something that reads like a wartime novel or love story, better pass this one by. This isn't that sort of book. It is very well written. The details and facts are presented in an interesting way. The personal accounts of several women are featured, along with information on Oak Ridge itself, the Manhattan project and wartime issues in the United States.

For more information on the author and her books, check out her website: http://www.denisekiernan.com/ ( )
  JuliW | Nov 22, 2020 |
This nonfiction account was the inspiration for The Atomic City Girls by Janet Beard, a fictional account of the same history, which I read as an advanced reader edition in 2018.  Both tell the story of the Oak Ridge, Tennessee uranium separation site of the Manhattan Project to create an atomic bomb during World War II.  Secret at the time (most working there had no idea what the project was), at its peak, it was home to about 75,000 people, many of them women.  Author Denise Kiernan featured nine women of the many (women and men) that she interviewed for the book, intertwining their personal stories with that of Oak Ridge.  Their chapters alternate with shorter, more scientific ones about "tubealloy," the project itself, which were a little harder to digest.  Includes black-and-white photographs, 31 pages of endnotes, and a 19-page index. ( )
  riofriotex | Oct 10, 2020 |
"Girls of Atomic City" had so much potential with themes surrounding WWII, women, science, the atomic bomb, and even racism. Unfortunately, the book was somewhat disappointing. Oversold as being more narrative, having more suspense, and being more about women than it actually was, this book turned out to be quite a dry read. It's almost as if there we two separate books that were combined. One book reading more like a timeline of facts and events about how Oakridge, Tennessee came to be, and then what became of it after the bomb dropped in Japan; the other book being about the "Girls" to which the title refers. Each one very interesting, but combined in such a way that made the reading disjointed and hard to follow.

The biggest disappointment in the book is how the women seem more like an afterthought - plugged in between sections about the city of Oakridge and its uranium processing facilities. Their stories were so broken up, it was very hard to keep track of who was who, and even harder to get emotionally invested in their stories.

An interesting history piece, but only a so-so story. ( )
  H4ppyN3rd | Oct 6, 2020 |
The Girls of Atomic City by Denise Kieran I wanted to like it but in the end I felt cheated. I read this cover to cover and kept waiting for the story about the "girls" to begin. The title proclaims the story of the women who helped make the first atomic bomb but in reality that is not what is really going on here.
 
What this is really about is the story of the atomic bomb because that is what the narrative is all about. Yes, women are mentioned here and there but this story is not really about them. It is about the bomb and the men who invented it and the men who made it happen.
 
You know how some books begin a paragraph with the first letter of the first sentence really big, say going over 2 or 3 lines then the following letters being normal size? Well that is called drop caps. The women in this book were like drop caps, introduced big but no follow up really.
Shame because it could have been good. ( )
  Ken-Me-Old-Mate | Sep 24, 2020 |
I registered a book at BookCrossing.com!
http://www.BookCrossing.com/journal/14123270
  slojudy | Sep 8, 2020 |
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (5)

In this book the author traces the story of the unsung World War II workers in Oak Ridge, Tennessee through interviews with dozens of surviving women and other Oak Ridge residents. This is the story of the young women of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, who unwittingly played a crucial role in one of the most significant moments in U.S. history. The Tennessee town of Oak Ridge was created from scratch in 1942. One of the Manhattan Project's secret cities, it did not appear on any maps until 1949, and yet at the height of World War II it was using more electricity than New York City and was home to more than 75,000 people, many of them young women recruited from small towns across the South. Their jobs were shrouded in mystery, but they were buoyed by a sense of shared purpose, close friendships, and a surplus of handsome scientists and Army men. But against this wartime backdrop, a darker story was unfolding. The penalty for talking about their work, even the most innocuous details, was job loss and eviction. One woman was recruited to spy on her coworkers. They all knew something big was happening at Oak Ridge, but few could piece together the true nature of their work until the bomb "Little Boy" was dropped over Hiroshima, Japan, and the secret was out. The shocking revelation: the residents of Oak Ridge were enriching uranium for the atomic bomb. Though the young women originally believed they would leave Oak Ridge after the war, many met husbands there, made lifelong friends, and still call the seventy-year-old town home. The reverberations from their work there, work they did not fully understand at the time, are still being felt today.

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