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Who's Afraid of the Song of the South? And Other Forbidden Disney…

– tekijä: Jim Korkis

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioKeskustelut
641323,427 (3.67)-
Brer Rabbit. Uncle Remus. Song of the South. Racist? Disney thinks so. And that's why it has forbidden the theatrical re-release of its classic film Song of the South since 1986. But is the film racist? Are its themes, its characters, even its music so abominable that Disney has done us a favor by burying the movie in its infamous Vault, where the Company claims it will remain for all time? Disney historian Jim Korkis does not so. In his newest book, Who's Afraid of the Song of the South?, Korkis examines the film from concept to controversy, and reveals the politics that nearly scuttled the project. Through interviews with many of the artists and animators who created Song of the South, and through his own extensive research, Korkis delivers both the definitive behind-the-scenes history of the film and a balanced analysis of its cultural impact. What else would Disney prefer you did not know? Plenty. Korkis also pulls back the curtain on such dubious chapters in Disney history as: * Disney's cinematic attack on venereal disease * Ward Kimball's obsession with UFOs * Tim Burton's depressed stint at the Disney Studios * Walt Disney's nightmares about his stomping an owl to death * Wally Wood's Disneyland Memorial Orgy poster * J. Edgar Hoover's hefty FBI file on Walt Disney * Little Black Sunflower's animated extinction Plus 10 more forbidden tales that Disney wishes would go away. Whether you're a film buff, an armchair academic, or a Disney fan eager to peek behind Disney's magical (and tightly controlled) curtain, you'll discover lots you never knew about Disney. With a foreword by Disney Legend Floyd Norman, Who's Afraid of the Song of the South? is both authoritative and entertaining. Jim Korkis is the best-selling author of Vault of Walt, and has been researching and writing about Disney for over three decades. The Disney Company itself uses his expertise for special projects. Korkis resides in Orlando, Florida.… (lisätietoja)
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REVIEW NOTES: I found this while entering my recently acquired DVD of Song of the South (not through Disney), which I thought was no longer available because of the PC as discussed in this book. I saw the movie in my youth and loved the music and stories, before somehow the world decided that featuring a Black actor as the core of a major motion picture was racist, just because he taught us that you didn't have to let adverse life conditions ruin your life - which is not consistent with the current Victimology Narrative of the Western Left.
I also have a full set of the books by Joel Chandler Harris that served as its foundation.

http://www.cartoonbrew.com/books/whos-afraid-of-song-of-the-south-by-jim-korkis-....

https://www.amazon.com/Afraid-South-Forbidden-Disney-Stories-ebook/dp/B00AG6G250
"Brer Rabbit. Uncle Remus. Song of the South. Racist?

Disney thinks so. And that's why it has forbidden the theatrical re-release of its classic film Song of the South since 1986.

But is the film racist? Are its themes, its characters, even its music so abominable that Disney has done us a favor by burying the movie in its infamous Vault, where the Company claims it will remain for all time?

Disney historian Jim Korkis does not think so.

In his newest book, Who's Afraid of the Song of the South?, Korkis examines the film from concept to controversy, and reveals the politics that nearly scuttled the project. Through interviews with many of the artists and animators who created Song of the South, and through his own extensive research, Korkis delivers both the definitive behind-the-scenes history of the film and a balanced analysis of its cultural impact.

What else would Disney prefer you did not know? Plenty.

Korkis also pulls back the curtain on such dubious chapters in Disney history.."

http://www.yesterland.com/whosafraid.html

"Werner: I saw Song of the South in a movie theater in 1972. But for Yesterland readers who have never seen it, please describe the film.
Jim: The live-action story is about a young boy named Johnny who is taken by his estranged parents to live on his grandmother's plantation in Georgia shortly after the Civil War. The boy has difficulty adapting to his new home even after making friends with a poor white girl named Jenny and a rambunctious black boy named Toby. He encounters an old black storyteller named Uncle Remus, who tells him tales of Brer Rabbit, Brer Fox, and Brer Bear. These stories help the boy learn some important lessons about life, and are told in animation scenes created by six of Disney's iconic Nine Old Men. The film is considered Walt Disney’s first live action film since the animation only comprises about one-third of the running time.
Werner: The controversy about Walt Disney’s Song of the South began even before the movie was released to theaters. You did a great job telling why Song of the South was the target of protests and the nature of the concerns about the movie. In the book, you don’t take a personal position condemning or defending it. You prefer to present the viewpoints of others.
Jim: Yes, I tried to present just the facts and allow the reader to come to his own decision. The more research I did on the film, the more I could clearly see and agree with the arguments for both sides.
Werner: It’s amazing to me that some people feel Song of the South is just a charming and completely inoffensive fantasy, while some others are convinced it’s an overtly and intentionally racist movie.
Jim: Personally, I believe the film should be available, if for no other reason than the fact that it doesn’t continue to stir up these uninformed reactions that the film is maliciously racist. On the other hand, I can see that people will refuse to look at the film in the context of the time in which it was made and never see how racially innovative it was in many ways. Those people will insist on seeing it with today’s perspectives and will also worry that despite all the other information that children are exposed to these days, that kids will not be smart or sensitive enough to see that it is just a fantasy film with some good moral lessons and not an historical documentary.
...
Werner: By not seeing Song of the South, what are people missing?
Jim: Song of the South has so many virtues to recommend it—from James Baskett’s Oscar award-winning performance as Uncle Remus, to some of the best animation ever done by the fabled Nine Old Men, to some memorable music to the first Technicolor work ever done by fabled cinematographer Gregg Toland, to some strong design work by Mary Blair—that it would be a shame if audiences would be denied the chance to enjoy and study that work.
Werner: Do you think that filmmakers today could bring the Uncle Remus stories to life in a way that would not stir up the controversy that Walt Disney’s 1946 effort did? Or would a movie in which an Uncle Remus character, in the context of the 19th century South, retells stories that originated as African folklore just be too loaded with potential problems?
Jim: Today, the situation is even more sensitive than when the film was first released. For example, new films are in the awkward position of not even being able to use historical dialects from the period. I think that people have not just become sensitive to racial themes, but sometimes overly sensitive to the point that it is uncomfortable to even think about addressing the topic. It is clearly awkward just to talk about Song of the South in today’s society.
Werner: So we won’t see new Uncle Remus stories on film...
Jim: There have been some animated versions of the Brer Rabbit tales released in the last few years, but because they were not done by Disney and were not done with the skill of Disney, they have not even been a topic of conversation. I think the Uncle Remus tales are good stories and part of the American heritage... not just Black America but all Americans. I am sad that they have been stolen from future generations by overly cautious guardians who find it easier to eliminate things rather than to address them honestly. "
  librisissimo | Apr 2, 2017 |
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
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Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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Brer Rabbit. Uncle Remus. Song of the South. Racist? Disney thinks so. And that's why it has forbidden the theatrical re-release of its classic film Song of the South since 1986. But is the film racist? Are its themes, its characters, even its music so abominable that Disney has done us a favor by burying the movie in its infamous Vault, where the Company claims it will remain for all time? Disney historian Jim Korkis does not so. In his newest book, Who's Afraid of the Song of the South?, Korkis examines the film from concept to controversy, and reveals the politics that nearly scuttled the project. Through interviews with many of the artists and animators who created Song of the South, and through his own extensive research, Korkis delivers both the definitive behind-the-scenes history of the film and a balanced analysis of its cultural impact. What else would Disney prefer you did not know? Plenty. Korkis also pulls back the curtain on such dubious chapters in Disney history as: * Disney's cinematic attack on venereal disease * Ward Kimball's obsession with UFOs * Tim Burton's depressed stint at the Disney Studios * Walt Disney's nightmares about his stomping an owl to death * Wally Wood's Disneyland Memorial Orgy poster * J. Edgar Hoover's hefty FBI file on Walt Disney * Little Black Sunflower's animated extinction Plus 10 more forbidden tales that Disney wishes would go away. Whether you're a film buff, an armchair academic, or a Disney fan eager to peek behind Disney's magical (and tightly controlled) curtain, you'll discover lots you never knew about Disney. With a foreword by Disney Legend Floyd Norman, Who's Afraid of the Song of the South? is both authoritative and entertaining. Jim Korkis is the best-selling author of Vault of Walt, and has been researching and writing about Disney for over three decades. The Disney Company itself uses his expertise for special projects. Korkis resides in Orlando, Florida.

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