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Color Atlas of Human Anatomy

– tekijä: R. M. H. McMinn

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
247181,749 (3.95)1
The object of this atlas is to assist undergraduates and postgraduates in the study of human anatomy. Of course, good textbooks and atlases already exit and by coloring arteries read and nerves yellow, for example, they are justly popular as aids to learning. But so often, and especially for newcomers to the subject, the interior of the body, and we believe it is helpful to show body structures as they actually exist in suitably prepared specimens of the kind that students see in the dissecting room and meet in examinations. In this way we hope to bridge the gap between the description of the textbook and the reality of the body. When a student is dissecting or being asked to identify a structure in an examination, when a physician is examining a patient, or when a surgeon is operating, they direct their gaze at any one time on to a fairly small area, and the size of the printed page has been carefully chosen so that the illustrations could be made approximately life-size. Obviously there are wide variations in body size and some illus tractions may appear larger and others smaller than a student's own particular specimen. Occasionally the monocular vision of the camera lens may give rise to a minor degree of distortion compared with similar views in a drawing. It is all to easy to alter a drawing to include or exclude anything that is wanted or not wanted, but with actual specimen ts the camera has an all-embracing eye and the choice of a precise camera angle has been all-important in showing the proper relationships of structures to one another. By displaying the parts of the body in their natural size we have been able to label structures by numbers overlying them and to avoid in most instances the use of unsightly leader lines, except for very small or crowded structures. For revision purposes students will be able to test their knowledge by covering up the numbered keys. Usually we have deliberately given different numbers to the same structure in similar dissections so that the student must exercise a judgment and cannot identify a structure simply by remembering a number from a previous picture (although in the case of bones a remembering a number from a previous picture (although in the case of bones a single key has been used for different views of the same bone in order to save space). In most illustrations numbering begins in the upper left part of the picture and proceeds in a clockwise direction, although it has not always been practical to adhere too rigidly to this scheme. Sometimes it has been considered helpful in large or complicated areas to label a structure more than once. An arrow instead of a leader line has been used to indicate that the structure referred to is under cover and out of sight just beyond the tip of the arrowhead. The short notes that accompany many of the keys either make a comment on the particular items in the specimens for draw attention to general points in the region concerned. They are not intended in any way to provide a comprehensive description of everything seen; our aim is to supplement existing texts, not to substitute for them. In order to produce a volume of reasonable proportions both in size and in price we have had to be selective in choosing the illustrations from the material available to us. We have deliberately chosen a variety of cadaveric and museum specimens, since different methods of preparation and preservation give a range of appearances as far as colour is concerned, and the student must not imagine that all specimens will look the same no matter how they have been treated. It will always be impossible to please everyone all the time; for some there will be too much detail, for others not enough, but we believe that we there will be too much detail, for other not enough, but we believe that we have at least covered most of the items that are most important to most students. Although many of the minutiae of muscle attachments to bones are hardly necessary for most people, we have covered bones in some detail in view hardly necessary for most people, we have covered bones in some details in view of the increasing difficulty of purchasing good specimens.… (lisätietoja)
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This is a great visual guide to accompany and anatomy or physiology book. The body is separated by region and then fully illustarted and labeled with skeltons, cadavers, and xray images. Highly recommended for any student of the human body. ( )
2 ääni kaelirenee | Oct 18, 2009 |
ei arvosteluja | lisää arvostelu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Ensimmäiset sanat
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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The object of this atlas is to assist undergraduates and postgraduates in the study of human anatomy. Of course, good textbooks and atlases already exit and by coloring arteries read and nerves yellow, for example, they are justly popular as aids to learning. But so often, and especially for newcomers to the subject, the interior of the body, and we believe it is helpful to show body structures as they actually exist in suitably prepared specimens of the kind that students see in the dissecting room and meet in examinations. In this way we hope to bridge the gap between the description of the textbook and the reality of the body. When a student is dissecting or being asked to identify a structure in an examination, when a physician is examining a patient, or when a surgeon is operating, they direct their gaze at any one time on to a fairly small area, and the size of the printed page has been carefully chosen so that the illustrations could be made approximately life-size. Obviously there are wide variations in body size and some illus tractions may appear larger and others smaller than a student's own particular specimen. Occasionally the monocular vision of the camera lens may give rise to a minor degree of distortion compared with similar views in a drawing. It is all to easy to alter a drawing to include or exclude anything that is wanted or not wanted, but with actual specimen ts the camera has an all-embracing eye and the choice of a precise camera angle has been all-important in showing the proper relationships of structures to one another. By displaying the parts of the body in their natural size we have been able to label structures by numbers overlying them and to avoid in most instances the use of unsightly leader lines, except for very small or crowded structures. For revision purposes students will be able to test their knowledge by covering up the numbered keys. Usually we have deliberately given different numbers to the same structure in similar dissections so that the student must exercise a judgment and cannot identify a structure simply by remembering a number from a previous picture (although in the case of bones a remembering a number from a previous picture (although in the case of bones a single key has been used for different views of the same bone in order to save space). In most illustrations numbering begins in the upper left part of the picture and proceeds in a clockwise direction, although it has not always been practical to adhere too rigidly to this scheme. Sometimes it has been considered helpful in large or complicated areas to label a structure more than once. An arrow instead of a leader line has been used to indicate that the structure referred to is under cover and out of sight just beyond the tip of the arrowhead. The short notes that accompany many of the keys either make a comment on the particular items in the specimens for draw attention to general points in the region concerned. They are not intended in any way to provide a comprehensive description of everything seen; our aim is to supplement existing texts, not to substitute for them. In order to produce a volume of reasonable proportions both in size and in price we have had to be selective in choosing the illustrations from the material available to us. We have deliberately chosen a variety of cadaveric and museum specimens, since different methods of preparation and preservation give a range of appearances as far as colour is concerned, and the student must not imagine that all specimens will look the same no matter how they have been treated. It will always be impossible to please everyone all the time; for some there will be too much detail, for others not enough, but we believe that we there will be too much detail, for other not enough, but we believe that we have at least covered most of the items that are most important to most students. Although many of the minutiae of muscle attachments to bones are hardly necessary for most people, we have covered bones in some detail in view hardly necessary for most people, we have covered bones in some details in view of the increasing difficulty of purchasing good specimens.

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