KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.
Hide this

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder…
Ladataan...

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 2012; vuoden 2013 painos)

– tekijä: Nassim Nicholas Taleb (Tekijä)

Sarjat: Incerto (4)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,948616,211 (3.85)9
"The acclaimed author of the influential bestseller The Black Swan, Nicholas Nassim Taleb takes a next big step with a deceptively simple concept: the "antifragile." Like the Greek hydra that grows two heads for each one it loses, people, systems, and institutions that are antifragile not only withstand shocks, they benefit from them. In a modern world dominated by chaos and uncertainty, Antifragile is a revolutionary vision from one of the most subversive and important thinkers of our time. Praise for Nicholas Nassim Taleb "[This] is the lesson of Taleb. and also the lesson of our volatile times. There is more courage and heroism in defying the human impulse, in taking the purposeful and painful steps to prepare for the unimaginable."--Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point "[Taleb writes] in a style that owes as much to Stephen Colbert as it does to Michel de Montaigne."--The Wall Street Journal "The most prophetic voice of all. [Taleb is] a genuinely significant philosopher. someone who is able to change the way we view the structure of the world through the strength, originality and veracity of his ideas alone."--GQ "Changed my view of how the world works."--Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate"--"Examples of Antifragility: When you stress your body by lifting a big weight, your body gets stronger. New York has the best restaurants in the world because particular restaurants are always going bust, making the aggregate stronger and stronger, or antifragile. Evolution is antifragile. Certain business and investment strategies are antifragile. Older things tend to be more antifragile than newer ones - because they've been exposed to more Black Swans"--… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:kaidoveski
Teoksen nimi:Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder
Kirjailijat:Nassim Nicholas Taleb (Tekijä)
Info:Penguin (2013), 544 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:-

Teoksen tarkat tiedot

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder (tekijä: Nassim Nicholas Taleb) (2012)

Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin, niin näet, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 9 mainintaa

englanti (60)  saksa (1)  Kaikki kielet (61)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 61) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Interesting perspective, really got me thinking. ( )
  Bookie379 | Apr 16, 2021 |
Let me start by saying that I wholeheartedly agree with the concept and practice of antifragility. I think it's too important of an idea to allow it to be dismissed in our modern era of globalization and interconnectedness. Today's world is both immensely larger and noticeably smaller than ever before. Arming your soul with an antifragility framework is a necessary skill to cultivate.

But this idea needs a better messenger. The author writes like he has a chip on his shoulder, like he's got something more than his point to prove. I don't know. Maybe there's a language and/or cultural barrier. I know this author, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, wrote Fooled by Randomness and the even more popular Black Swan, but apart from that I don't know anything about him. There might be more to the story. ( )
  Daniel.Estes | Feb 21, 2021 |
Made it about 2.5 hours in (15%). Perhaps audiobook is not the best format for Antifragile; despite recommendations from multiple people that this was a good book, I just couldn't get into it. It seemed like Taleb was spending a crazy amount of time shitting on "intelligentsia" and others that don't agree with him, to the point where there would be multiple minutes in which he'd fail to put forth any idea. It just became a poor use of time. ( )
  rsanek | Dec 26, 2020 |
Actually quite a good book. I liked Black Swan and Fooled by Randomness except for the "ok i mostly agree - stop being so arrogant" feeling one gets when reading. Antifragile does answer the "and now what do you suggest" question which arises after his other books. Thats nice!

In a nutshell: the first third is worth reading, the second third is boring, the third third - especially the ethics part - is fragile with respect to evolution. ( )
  DanProbst | Dec 22, 2020 |
I first heard of the concept of antifragile in an Econtalk podcast interview with the author Nassim Nicholas Taleb before the book was published. I found the concept really fascinating, and now that I have (at last) read the book, the subject turned out to be even more interesting than I imagined.

So antifragile is the opposite of fragile. What exactly does that mean? Isn't it the same thing as robust? No, there is a triple (or triad) like this:

FRAGILE - ROBUST - ANTIFRAGILE

The fragile is harmed by volatility, stressors and disorder, the robust doesn't care, and the antifragile benefits from volatility, stressors and disorder. An illustration early in the book is when you send a package in the mail. If you send for example wine glasses, you could put a sticker on it saying "fragile", and hope that it would be handled carefully. If you send something robust (say a book), it wouldn't matter too much how the package was handled, since it is hard to harm a book. But in what case would you put a sticker on that says "antifragile - place mishandle"? What is there that gains from disorder?

Well, quite a lot as it turns out (although I don't have an example of something that would be sent in the mail). A good example is the human body. If it isn't used, the muscles wither and the bones get weak. It is antifragile, because it gains from the volatility of being used. The disorder is good up to a point - the variations cannot be too big. Too much stress, for example falling from a building, will harm it, but in small doses random variations are not only not harmful, but actually helpful. Throughout the book, Taleb gives many more examples of antifragile systems. For me, one of the benefits of this book is that I have started to look at systems and concepts through the lens of antifragility.

Fragile/antifragile can also exist on different levels. The whole can be antifragile because the parts are fragile. An example used in the book is restaurants. Individual local restaurants compete with each other, and are therefore fragile to a degree. But because of this competition, the collective of local restaurants is antifragile. Some restaurants close down, and new ones open instead, so there are always interesting restaurants to go to. If the restaurants where individually robust, and therefore would never fail, the overall restaurant scene would be stagnant.

A problem Taleb sees with modern life is that there is a strong tendency to remove variability and randomness in order to get stability. Trying to control the economy and smooth out the peaks and valleys may create more stability in the short run. But firms become weak during long periods of no setbacks, and hidden vulnerabilities accumulate. Eventually this may lead to a big crisis. So the price of suppressing many small crises is having a really big one instead. This is analogous trying to prevent all forest fires. If all small fires are put out, eventually there may be a really big one, because there has been such a build-up of burnable material.

A related concept is iatrogenics - damage caused by the healer. People often like to think that they understand complex systems, and want to control them (for example stabilize them). However, with complex systems, interventions often have unintended consequences that end up causing problems of their own. It is also very tempting to intervene, even though the best course of action may be to do nothing. If you intervene successfully, you can become a hero, but hardly anybody is considered a hero for abstaining from doing something. Taleb also gives several examples from medicine, where medical procedures may give a small benefit, but can sometimes cause big problems (even the death of the patient).

Another way to look at antifragility is that there is more upside than downside. That which is antifragile has the option of using variations to its advantage. Take companies. A big company is more fragile, and a small startup is more antifragile. The big company is set in its ways, whereas the startup can more easily adapt to changing circumstances. Furthermore, when you have a situation where you are able to profit from volatility (when you have more potential upside than downside), you are less dependent on forecasts and predictions. This is good, since there will always be some errors in the forecasts.

There is also a section on universities and technological development. Do universities cause technical progress. Not according to Taleb. There is a tension between education, which loves order, and innovation, which loves disorder. A lot of technical innovations come from luck, tinkering, and trial and error. Often, theory comes after, but when a discovery or innovation is described afterwards, it seems more planned and ordered than it really was.

At the end of the book there is a section on the ethics of upsides and downsides and the concept of "skin in the game". For example, an executive that gets a large bonus when things go well at a company, but still receives the regular salary if things go poorly has only upside, but no downside. Since there is no downside, there is no "skin in the game". To have "skin in the game", you have to also share in the downside, for example if you run your own company. There is also the reverse situation - downside, but no upside. This applies to for example soldiers. They run the risk of dying (downside), but there is no particular upside.

These were the main themes that stood out for me from the book. There were many other concepts in it that I liked as well, so I will just list a few of them (without a lot of explanations):

Black swan event - the odds of rare events are not computable.

The ludic fallacy - probabilities in real life are not like probabilities at a casino. In real life it is never as clean-cut, you always have to estimate, but you may forget to account for something (for example a black swan event).

The turkey problem - for the turkey, life looks really good, until Thanksgiving occurs.

The Lindy effect - the longer a phenomenon has been around, the longer it can be expected to continue to be around.

Touristification - the systematic removal of uncertainty and randomness in how we live our lives.

Via negativa - negative knowledge (knowing what does not work) is more robust to error than positive knowledge (knowing what works).

So, what was bad with the book? Taleb has a tendency to ramble on a bit too much, causing to the book to be unnecessarily thick. His self-confidence is also rather high, which can put some people off (not me though). But these problems only affect the style, not the substance, of what he has to say.

Antifragile is thick, and it covers a lot of ground, so it was difficult to write a review of it. But I think it is a very important book. It is by far the book that I have underlined the most in. I have also noticed that since I finished reading it (a few months ago), I have referred to it in conversations several times. So it was well worth the effort of reading, and it has given me powerful new ideas and additional ways of looking at and analysing systems.

I have also written about this book in relation to software development on my blog: https://henrikwarne.com/2014/06/08/antifragility-and-software-development/ ( )
  Henrik_Warne | Dec 13, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 61) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Sometimes Nassim Nicholas Taleb is led astray by his contrarianism, but then that is his point: If you don't take risks, you don't get results. This is a bold, entertaining, clever book, richly crammed with insights, stories, fine phrases and intriguing asides. Does it achieve its goal, or does it cram and twist the world on to a Procrustean bed of one theory, thereby somewhat contradicting its own empirical and pragmatic outlook? I am not sure. I will have to read it again. And again.
lisäsi Taphophile13 | muokkaaWall Street Journal, Matt Ridley (Nov 27, 2012)
 
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Kanoninen teoksen nimi
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Palkinnot ja kunnianosoitukset
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Für Sarah Josephine Taleb
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Wind löscht eine Kerzenflamme, offenes Feuer regt er an.
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
(Napsauta nähdäksesi. Varoitus: voi sisältää juonipaljastuksia)
Erotteluhuomautus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Antifragile has regional subtitles.
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot saksankielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Canonical DDC/MDS

Viittaukset tähän teokseen muissa lähteissä.

Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (5)

"The acclaimed author of the influential bestseller The Black Swan, Nicholas Nassim Taleb takes a next big step with a deceptively simple concept: the "antifragile." Like the Greek hydra that grows two heads for each one it loses, people, systems, and institutions that are antifragile not only withstand shocks, they benefit from them. In a modern world dominated by chaos and uncertainty, Antifragile is a revolutionary vision from one of the most subversive and important thinkers of our time. Praise for Nicholas Nassim Taleb "[This] is the lesson of Taleb. and also the lesson of our volatile times. There is more courage and heroism in defying the human impulse, in taking the purposeful and painful steps to prepare for the unimaginable."--Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point "[Taleb writes] in a style that owes as much to Stephen Colbert as it does to Michel de Montaigne."--The Wall Street Journal "The most prophetic voice of all. [Taleb is] a genuinely significant philosopher. someone who is able to change the way we view the structure of the world through the strength, originality and veracity of his ideas alone."--GQ "Changed my view of how the world works."--Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate"--"Examples of Antifragility: When you stress your body by lifting a big weight, your body gets stronger. New York has the best restaurants in the world because particular restaurants are always going bust, making the aggregate stronger and stronger, or antifragile. Evolution is antifragile. Certain business and investment strategies are antifragile. Older things tend to be more antifragile than newer ones - because they've been exposed to more Black Swans"--

No library descriptions found.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Nassim Nicholas Taleb's book Antifragile was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Pikalinkit

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.85)
0.5
1 14
1.5 3
2 23
2.5 4
3 63
3.5 18
4 104
4.5 13
5 115

Penguin Australia

Penguin Australia on kustantanut tämän kirjan 2 painosta.

Painokset: 1846141567, 1846141575

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 157,173,605 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä