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Pan: Roman – tekijä: Knut Hamsun
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Pan: Roman (alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi 1894; vuoden 2009 painos)

– tekijä: Knut Hamsun, Knut Hamsun (Tekijä), Aldo Keel (Nachwort), Ingeborg Keel (Übersetzer)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,2212911,632 (3.96)38
One of Knut Hamsun's most famous works, "Pan" is the story of Lieutenant Thomas Glahn, an ex-military man who lives alone in the woods with his faithful dog Aesop. Glahn's life changes when he meets Edvarda, a merchant's daughter, whom he quickly falls in love with. She, however, is not entirely faithful to him, which affects him profoundly. "Pan" is a fascinating study in the psychological impact of unrequited love and helped to win the Nobel Prize in Literature for Hamsun.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Kuroyagi
Teoksen nimi:Pan: Roman
Kirjailijat:Knut Hamsun
Muut tekijät:Knut Hamsun (Tekijä), Aldo Keel (Nachwort), Ingeborg Keel (Übersetzer)
Info:Manesse Verlag (2009), Gebundene Ausgabe, 256 pages
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):****
Avainsanoja:decadence, myth, literature

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Pan (tekijä: Knut Hamsun) (1894)

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» Katso myös 38 mainintaa

englanti (23)  hollanti (2)  norja (1)  ruotsi (1)  ranska (1)  Kaikki kielet (28)
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2 ( )
  MRMP | Jan 9, 2021 |
2 ( )
  MRMP | Jan 9, 2021 |
“He was a warrior, a warrior for mankind, and a prophet of the gospel of justice for all nations.”

Hamsun wrote this in 1945, after the suicide of Hitler.
It certainly adds "color" to a novel, when you find out its author was a lackey for Hitler.

Before you fling Pan out the window however, the author Isaac Bashevis Singer said this about him:
“The whole school of fiction in the 20th century stems from Hamsun...".

So there's definitely two-sides to the man, and Pan, though a minor novel compared to Hunger, is worth investigating. ( )
  runningbeardbooks | Sep 29, 2020 |
Before I talk about Pan and Knut Hamsun, I want to address the translator, Sverre Lyngstad. This is the fourth Hamsun novel that I've read, and Lyngstad has both translated and written an introduction to all four. I owe my love of Hamsun almost entirely to him. His beautiful translations (always accompanied by explanations for the alterations he made to previous efforts) bring a profound warmth to Hamsun's frigid Norwegian wilderness, and his thoughtful introductions have helped me see Hamsun's characters as so much more than the impulsive emotional wrecks they appear to be upon first glance. I'm grateful to still have five more Lyngstad translations to enjoy in the future, and I'll be thinking of him tomorrow, on what would have been his 96th birthday.

Pan features Hamsun at his most concise. Lieutenant Thomas Glahn recounts to us a summer he spent in northern Norway, where he fell in love, had a few meltdowns, killed some stuff, and then went back south. That may sound like an exciting summer to you, but to me, a man who spent many of his childhood summers in Muncie, Indiana, it sounds pretty ordinary.

Glahn is a typical Hamsun protagonist, bouncing from ecstasy to despair and all the way back again over the course of most of his conversations. His passion overtakes him on occasion, and he publicly makes an embarrassment of himself from time to time, but he still manages to do fairly well with the ladies. His talents are different from those of the unnamed protagonist in Hunger and Johan Nagel from Mysteries, but his impulse control (or lack-thereof) falls right in line with theirs.

Glahn has several significant relationships throughout the summer, both with women (Edvarda and Eva) and his dog (Aesop), but perhaps his most compelling relationship is his connection to his natural surroundings. He professes his love for solitude and his oneness with nature every chance he gets, and he is frequently moved to tears just by gazing at the foliage outside his hut. I wouldn't have caught this if Sverre Lyngstad hadn't mentioned it in his introduction, but Glahn's histrionics don't resemble the actions of your typical nature-type guy like a Les Stroud or someone like that. Lyngstad described Glahn's actions as "signs of an oversensitive, nostalgic urban sensibility rather than of a primordial oneness with nature." His point is a good one, driving home a major distinction between the natural world and the human world.

I don't mean to say that nature isn't filled with drama. Try watching a crocodile tear apart a gazelle on National Geographic without feeling anything. But all that drama happens out of necessity. Crocodiles don't lick individual blades of grass and then feel a sense of kinship with them. Glahn does. If you compare him to Isak, Hamsun's stoic, simple-minded pioneer from Growth of the Soil, Glahn seems to be overacting, playing a hyper-romanticized, Johnny Appleseed figure. The question is whether he's trying to sell his act to us, or if he's more concerned with selling it to himself.

If you look at his interpersonal interactions, Glahn needs the woods more than the woods needs him. He's socially maladroit, admitting that his gaffes in conversation are both numerous and humiliating. He's not much for making friends, if his relationship with every other character in the book is anything to go by. So we find ourselves with a chicken and egg question. Which came first, the social ineptitude or the love of solitude?

Why do we love the things we love? Do we love out of a pure, genuine affection, or do we love because we struggle with something else or hate someone else? Those questions don't just apply to Glahn, although he would have been far better off asking them. I envision Screwtape writing to Glahn's own personal Wormwood, something along the lines of, "Love this, not because you love it, but because you hate something else. That's the game."

I don't really like Glahn, but I understand him entirely. That's Hamsun's great gift. You don't just get a character's thoughts and actions, you get their whole thought process. You see the way their thoughts and emotions build, why and how they come to feel the things they feel. There's never much physical action in a Hamsun novel, but the minds of his characters run marathons in record time across his pages. Isn't that the way most of us are, living static lives while thinking about thousands upon thousands of pasts, presents, and futures that could never, should never, but maybe might just happen? We take the slightest of actions, a quick glance in our direction, a raised eyebrow, any movement gone unnoticed by everyone else in the room, and we turn it into that person's final judgment of who we are as people, either to be adored or despised for all eternity. Call Hamsun dramatic if you want, but if there are any authors as good at elucidating the nuances of the human psyche as he is, there are certainly none better.

Hamsun brings out the best in me as a reader. I typically don't care about scenery, but in Pan, Hamsun has forced me to see the wilderness of Nordland through the eyes of a man who desperately needs to love it. I'm always a sucker for psychological turmoil, and the fact that Pan supplies several full meals worth of it comes as no surprise. More than anything, though, there's just no substitute for quality prose, and Hamsun gives it to me (and Lyngstad translates it for me) every time. I love to read the sentences he writes, and I'm not planning on stopping anytime soon. ( )
  bgramman | May 9, 2020 |
A man who feels at home in the woods is undone by the love of a local woman. Love of nature shines through in the translation. ( )
  questbird | Feb 5, 2019 |
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» Lisää muita tekijöitä (50 mahdollista)

Tekijän nimiRooliTekijän tyyppiKoskeeko teosta?Tila
Hamsun, Knutensisijainen tekijäkaikki painoksetvahvistettu
Lehtonen, JoelKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Marken, Amy vanJälkisanatmuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
McFarlane, James Waltermuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Schuijlenburg, HermineKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Seeberg, EvaKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Törnqvist-Verschuur… MarguériteKääntäjämuu tekijäeräät painoksetvahvistettu
Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
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These last few days I have thought and thought of the Nordland summer's endless day.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia

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One of Knut Hamsun's most famous works, "Pan" is the story of Lieutenant Thomas Glahn, an ex-military man who lives alone in the woods with his faithful dog Aesop. Glahn's life changes when he meets Edvarda, a merchant's daughter, whom he quickly falls in love with. She, however, is not entirely faithful to him, which affects him profoundly. "Pan" is a fascinating study in the psychological impact of unrequited love and helped to win the Nobel Prize in Literature for Hamsun.

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