KotiRyhmätKeskusteluLisääAjan henki
Etsi sivustolta
Tämä sivusto käyttää evästeitä palvelujen toimittamiseen, toiminnan parantamiseen, analytiikkaan ja (jos et ole kirjautunut sisään) mainostamiseen. Käyttämällä LibraryThingiä ilmaiset, että olet lukenut ja ymmärtänyt käyttöehdot ja yksityisyydensuojakäytännöt. Sivujen ja palveluiden käytön tulee olla näiden ehtojen ja käytäntöjen mukaista.

Tulokset Google Booksista

Pikkukuvaa napsauttamalla pääset Google Booksiin.

Ladataan...

An Imperial Possession: Britain in the Roman Empire, 54 BC - AD 409 (2006)

Tekijä: David Mattingly

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
2236119,044 (3.79)6
The centuries under which Britain was under Roman occupation have always had a contradictory reputation. Generations of British readers were brought up to approve of the Roman Empire as the model for their own empire, but equally it was embarrassingly clear that within the Roman Empire Britain itself was merely an unattractive exploitation colony. David Mattingly's major new book draws on a wealth of new research to recreate brilliantly this colonial Britain- a rebellious, disadvantaged place needing heavy garrisoning and highly vulnerable to political change in Rome. The result puts the whole great story in a new and fascinating light.… (lisätietoja)
Ladataan...

Kirjaudu LibraryThingiin nähdäksesi, pidätkö tästä kirjasta vai et.

Ei tämänhetkisiä Keskustelu-viestiketjuja tästä kirjasta.

» Katso myös 6 mainintaa

Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 6) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
I am a history buff and an Anglophile, but the length and repetitiveness of this book wore even me down after a while. There's a lot of good information here, but it could have been cut by a hundred pages without losing much, and I found myself longing to rearrange chapters and sections to make it flow better. The author's thesis is intriguing, but I wish it had been better argued. ( )
  GaylaBassham | May 27, 2018 |
There were three Britannias going on in this period, the "Official Roman Province, a Mediterranean commercial community and the remains of the indigenous society the romans had conquered. The author seems to advance the view that the three groups did not meld very successfully by the time of the Roman withdrawal. In short, this is the anti-colonialist view. A necessary corrective to Rosemary Sutcliff, but a little sad for me. Seems likely, though. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Sep 26, 2017 |
A history of Roman Britain which changes the older viewpoint based on seeing the Romans as forerunners of the British Empire. Britain was a colony and an exploited one. The book is undoubtedly over long for its purpose as a general introduction to the period and part of a series on British history up to the present day. This is more of a commercial comment as it is worth the reading. The author pulls together the available information which is largely archaeological but he includes and analyses all the available written material. He analyses Britannia through the lens of three social groups – the military, the Romanised civilians and the non-Romanised. This gives a quite new perspective on the period. The military were obviously very Romanised, very literate and very much part of a larger organisation. While not necessarily identical to military units elsewhere they were very similar. Much of Britain’s trade was based around them and they were the big spenders of the colony. In the towns and the villas people were less literate, less ‘Roman’ (in their eating habits for instance). The non-Romanised British changed their way of life very slowly if at all.

The author doesn't shy away from the fact that it was a frequently bloody occupation run for the benefit of the conquerors not the inhabitants. This, oddly, gives you a more balanced view of the time.
  Caomhghin | May 13, 2013 |
Mattingly tries to consider Britain in the Roman Empire rather than the Romans in Britain. He wants to know what it was like for the people of Britain being on the receiving end of Roman imperial rule. Since Caesar forgot to also divide Britain into three parts, Mattingly does so looking at the military, the urban population and the rural population through their archaeological remains.

Although this book is meant to be aimed at the general reader rather than the specialist, I found it very heavy going. I suspect it might have worked better as an interactive website, with summarising texts accompanied by clickable maps so that one could then look at the archaeological evidence in as much or as little detail as one wishes ( )
  Robertgreaves | Aug 24, 2012 |
Even with quite an extensive reading of British history and some previous knowledge of the Roman Occupation this was somewhat of a tough read, requiring study and reference to OS maps and other resource to follow the rich details and – to steal from Eric Newby – a cast of thousands like a Cecil B De Mille Hollywood epic. Because I want to know more of the famous II Legion Augusta, “The Engineers” and their life in Britain, I persevered and did enjoy that same depth of scholarship of David Mattingly’s, that gave this reader such trouble in trying to keep up with the flow of this enormously well-researched history. The only residual criticism of the work is a reflection on those troubles of mine – the absence of maps that would have helped in the spatial placing of events in each chapter. There are maps and charts however – over 20 of them – but they are in specialist detail and did not help this particular reader in trying to grasp exactly where the specific action in the text occurred. Perhaps on a rereading which I already plan, things will become more interlinked.

There was also a tantalizing reference to the recently discovered trove of early Roman, and very human documents from the very region and legion of my interest, but sadly not much detail from those was used in this work. I understand that Guy de la Bedoyere’s book, Roman Britain contains more from this source. (http://www.librarything.com/work/966884/book/5352293)
  John_Vaughan | Apr 15, 2012 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 6) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Certain aspects of Mattingly's negative stance strike me as anachronistic: to state, for example (p. 7), that Roman imperialism was applied without the consent of the population is inappropriate, since democracy, as it is now understood, is a relatively recent concept! In fact, through a critique of the Roman provincial system, it is the colonialism of the seventeenth-twentieth centuries that Mattingly is taking to task. Though this is a political position I share, it is not a historical viewpoint: I believe that historical critique must shed its ghosts, in this case colonialism, as has already been done in the now obsolete debate on the ancient economy between 'primitivists' and 'modernists'.
 

Kuuluu näihin sarjoihin

Sinun täytyy kirjautua sisään voidaksesi muokata Yhteistä tietoa
Katso lisäohjeita Common Knowledge -sivuilta (englanniksi).
Teoksen kanoninen nimi
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Alkuteoksen nimi
Teoksen muut nimet
Alkuperäinen julkaisuvuosi
Henkilöt/hahmot
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät paikat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Tärkeät tapahtumat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kirjaan liittyvät elokuvat
Epigrafi (motto tai mietelause kirjan alussa)
Omistuskirjoitus
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
For the Harolds
Ensimmäiset sanat
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
This book tells the story of the occupation of Britain by the Romans
Sitaatit
Viimeiset sanat
Erotteluhuomautus
Julkaisutoimittajat
Kirjan kehujat
Alkuteoksen kieli
Tiedot englanninkielisestä Yhteisestä tiedosta. Muokkaa kotoistaaksesi se omalle kielellesi.
Kanoninen DDC/MDS
Kanoninen LCC
The centuries under which Britain was under Roman occupation have always had a contradictory reputation. Generations of British readers were brought up to approve of the Roman Empire as the model for their own empire, but equally it was embarrassingly clear that within the Roman Empire Britain itself was merely an unattractive exploitation colony. David Mattingly's major new book draws on a wealth of new research to recreate brilliantly this colonial Britain- a rebellious, disadvantaged place needing heavy garrisoning and highly vulnerable to political change in Rome. The result puts the whole great story in a new and fascinating light.

Kirjastojen kuvailuja ei löytynyt.

Kirjan kuvailu
Yhteenveto haiku-muodossa

Current Discussions

-

Suosituimmat kansikuvat

Pikalinkit

Arvio (tähdet)

Keskiarvo: (3.79)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 4
3.5 4
4 2
4.5 3
5 3

Oletko sinä tämä henkilö?

Tule LibraryThing-kirjailijaksi.

Penguin Australia

Penguin Australia on julkaissut painoksen tästä kirjasta.

» Kustantajan sivusto

 

Lisätietoja | Ota yhteyttä | LibraryThing.com | Yksityisyyden suoja / Käyttöehdot | Apua/FAQ | Blogi | Kauppa | APIs | TinyCat | Perintökirjastot | Varhaiset kirja-arvostelijat | Yleistieto | 201,800,577 kirjaa! | Yläpalkki: Aina näkyvissä