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A geek in Japan : [discovering the land of…
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A geek in Japan : [discovering the land of manga, anime, Zen, and the tea… (vuoden 2010 painos)

– tekijä: Héctor García

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
241484,990 (3.39)2
This is a hip, smart and concise guide to the land that is their source. Comprehensive and well informed, it covers a wide array of topics in short articles accompanied by sidebars and numerous photographs, providing a lively digest of the society and culture of Japan. Designed to appeal to the generations of Westerners who grew up on Pokemon, manga and video games, this book reinvents the culture guide for readers in the Internet age.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:Remocpi
Teoksen nimi:A geek in Japan : [discovering the land of manga, anime, Zen, and the tea ceremony]
Kirjailijat:Héctor García
Info:Tokyo ; Rutland, Vt. : Tuttle Pub., c2010.
Kokoelmat:Oma kirjasto
Arvio (tähdet):
Avainsanoja:to-read

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A Geek in Japan: Discovering the Land of Manga, Anime, Zen, and the Tea Ceremony (tekijä: Héctor García)

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» Katso myös 2 mainintaa

englanti (3)  ruotsi (1)  Kaikki kielet (4)
näyttää 4/4
Covers a wide variety of topics to a good level of detail. I couldn't get around the fact that there seemed to be a lot of blanket statements about Japan / Japanese culture. Maybe it was the phrasing (I've also never been to Japan, so I have no first-hand knowledge), but some parts came across as more stereotypical than informative.
  Pascale1812 | Apr 16, 2020 |
Japan, Travel ( )
  Yaxx | Jul 13, 2018 |
This is an interesting book born out of the kirainet.com blog. It covers lots of aspects of Japanese life and culture, and has a surprising amount of detail. Written by a Spanish man living and working in Japan it gives an outsiders perspective, but that of someone living there long term. Lots of information was new to me or I just hadn't thought of while I was there. The translation occasionally feels a little awkward though. ( )
  AlisonSakai | Jan 7, 2018 |
A Geek in Japan is one of those books I saw on the shelf at my local bookstore and just had to have. I love Japan and I love to learn more about it. A Geek in Japan is deceiving though, in that it contains much more information than you think at first glance. Hector Garcia has obviously put a lot of time and effort into researching this book, which delves into many aspects of Japan. It includes history, social structures (I learned more from this book than I did from six years of Japanese), culture, work life, leisure, anime, cosplay, vending machines, zen, Shinto, Buddhism, temples, shrines and walking tours of various places in Tokyo.

What I found very interesting was that according to Hector, the Japanese wish for harmony as a whole over triumph of the individual – which is very different to what occurs in the West. It was also interesting to see repetition given as a way of learning – if you do something hundreds of times, you will end up getting it right. The work structures were also very interesting – the consultation between many levels with the focus on precision. If I wasn’t a gaijin, I think I’d like this!

Hector explains things very clearly in the majority of circumstances but occasionally the English sounded a little ‘off’ to me (for example, a lot of use of the word ‘moreover’). This is a small thing to get used to.

I learnt so much from this book, more than I did over a long period of study and a long trip to Japan. It clarified a lot of things for me. Well done on a great book – this would certainly be of use to those going to Japan or just wanting to know more about it. The pictures are excellent too. ( )
2 ääni birdsam0610 | Aug 9, 2011 |
näyttää 4/4


Not many blogs have made the transition from monitor screen to print. Correction: not many of the over 156 million personal weblogs on the internet have made a successful transition to book form. Some of the creations which have made it include, in no particular order, “Julie & Julia,” “I Hope They Serve Beer In Hell,” “Stuff White People Like,” “The Joys Of Engrish,” “This Is Why You’re Fat,” “I Can Haz Cheezburger” and “Post Secret” — which later became a series of five NYT bestsellers. Though it’s safe to say the bulk of them are compendiums of crowd-sourced content, it remains a drop in the bucket compared to the sheer volume of websites out there — both good and bad.

Hector Garcia came to Japan in 2004, a mild-mannered Spanish software engineer who started posting in Spanish about his new life in Japan and the things that interested him here. His blog, kirainet.com, was a way to document his explorations of all the crazy foibles of Japanese pop culture: the manga, the maids, the otaku, the idols, the gadgets. He subtitled it “A Geek In Japan.”

It quickly became one of the most-read Spanish blogs on the interwebs. It was named one of the best Spanish blogs of 2004 — if not the best — on numerous media lists in his home country. By 2006, Garcia was translating kirainet.com and posting entries in English. He was documenting not only otaku culture, but also Japanese cultural history, customs and travel. It has since gone on to become one of the top ten blogs on Japan—period.

Published in Spanish in 2008, “A Geek In Japan” made it onto the bestseller list there, and is currently into its fourth printing. Now, Tuttle has published it English.

For those living in Japan the book, on first glance, seems to be just another book about how different and crazy it is here. But while it might not be the in-depth field guide to Japanese history, culture, politics or religion you might look for on the reference shelves, there is more than enough here to recommend it to anyone with a passing interest in Japanese pop culture, or as a gift for those with friends outside the country who are interested in your land of residence.

Starting with a general overview of Japan, its later pop culture sections are one of the strengths of the book. Colorful and teeming with pictures, the book brims with page after page of Garcia’s own photos, giving an intricate look at whatever craze or obsession you might fancy. Subcultures, anime and manga, youth tribes, modern Japanese pop music, and television are all included; but there are some surprisingly serious entries here that belie Garcia’s knowledge of all things tech- and Electric Town-oriented.

In one entry, he tackles the Japanese attitude toward suicide, explaining it as a Shinto belief in doing the right thing: “Today, if the father of a family cannot repay a loan or cover the cost of his son’s or daughter’s wedding, he may resort to suicide in order for them to receive the money from his life insurance.”

Garcia’s book is more than just a compilation of otaku culture and the crazy Japanese pop life articles that blog pundits who don’t live here love to gab on about. It takes the best of his entries from the website and fleshes them out within the bigger picture of today’s modern Japan. This, combined with some great street-cred photography and lots of personal insight, makes “A Geek in Japan” a great table-top book for quality skimming.
 
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This is a hip, smart and concise guide to the land that is their source. Comprehensive and well informed, it covers a wide array of topics in short articles accompanied by sidebars and numerous photographs, providing a lively digest of the society and culture of Japan. Designed to appeal to the generations of Westerners who grew up on Pokemon, manga and video games, this book reinvents the culture guide for readers in the Internet age.

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