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Alone Together: Why We Expect More from…
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Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each… (vuoden 2017 painos)

– tekijä: Sherry Turkle (Tekijä)

JäseniäKirja-arvostelujaSuosituimmuussijaKeskimääräinen arvioMaininnat
1,0883114,279 (3.6)9
In "Alone Together," MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It's a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for--and sacrificing--in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today's self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.… (lisätietoja)
Jäsen:hellojaekim
Teoksen nimi:Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other
Kirjailijat:Sherry Turkle (Tekijä)
Info:Basic Books (2017), Edition: 3rd ed., 400 pages
Kokoelmat:Digital library
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Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other (tekijä: Sherry Turkle)

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» Katso myös 9 mainintaa

englanti (29)  ranska (1)  Kaikki kielet (30)
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 30) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
Heavy on the experiences(Like Jean Twenge). I feel like it could have been shorter. But so much good information and observations. And it's only gotten intensely worse. ( )
  OutOfTheBestBooks | Sep 24, 2021 |
Highly recommended.

This is an academically-oriented book - written with laypeople in mind - about man's growing relationship with technology. It chronicles from the early days of novelty to the current days of dependency. A fascinating - and revealing book - it's been a while since I felt so unravelled after reading. My worldview with regard to technology has been challenged for the better. ( )
  redeemedronin | Dec 28, 2020 |
I picked up this audiobook from the library because the title revived me of the situation we are going through now being sober together with quarantine and 'Rona. W hike I knew this want coordinating with the current situation, but with technology. However it was very different than I expected, mainly because i misread the sub title "We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other" as I thought it was about why WE SHOULD expect more from technology and less from each other. So while I was expecting an uplifting tale about how things aren't that bad and technology is already saving us. Instead I get a boomertastic Tome about how awful reddit is. "Oh my gorsh! The Japs are f'n robots! Oh my gorsh everyone has a BlackBerry! Ohhhhh no body writes let's anymore!

She starts out with an introduction saying that she's not talking about robots but the internet, then goes on for half the book to talk about robots. It's so different especially when I just finished "I, robot" a week a go.

The most interesting part b was being revived of how much social media has changed in the 10 years since this book was when. The Facebook she speaks of is almost unrecognizable compared with the 2020 incarnation. Oh and don't forget "oh my gorsh! I just made a MySpace page, why didn't need Facebook?"

Now it's just for old people

How someone has made a career studying the interaction between man and technology and hates tech so much, I have n no clue.

Practically no redeeming qualities at all. ( )
  fulner | Nov 3, 2020 |
I've been feeling a becoming-less-vague dislike of social media and portable connectivity for a while now, but had chalked those up to Luddite impulses that I should get over. This book has made me reevaluate whether those feelings are actually good. Things like my partner being on his phone constantly during meals (I feel lonely), browsing aimlessly through Facebook and feeling more and more insecure about the image I get of other people's lives compared to my own, and wishing I kept in touch with more people by phone and letters. These are all normal results of having the illusion of closer connections to people, when really they are elsewhere or only sharing an inauthentic version of themselves to the masses, rather than just me.

It makes me want to quit FB. I'm not going to do that (curiosity about people who are only there in my life), but I've started only logging on to check notifications and then getting out. I think it's better for my brain. I've never got into Twitter and couldn't come up with a really good justification for why not; I'm just not interested. Now I realize that it's because while it would connect me to a lot of people, those would all be superficial connections to people who didn't actually care about me, might not be there tomorrow, and of whom I couldn't expect a whole lot. I don't want 1000 followers; I want 10 friends that I talk to and see regularly.

This book also made me think a lot about parenting, and how I hope my kid(s) don't grow up with the assumption that they have no privacy and no space to themselves without other people expecting them to respond. Good lord; ten years ago I could spend a whole day out and about and only have pay phones to use! I don't want to be always on, always available. I don't want to be the parent that bans cell phones, and I also don't want to spend their adolescence constantly arguing about how I resist things that everyone else already does. It's too much for one person to fight. Step one, though, I'm getting from Turkle, would be to put away *my* phone and computer, and just pay attention to them. Duh. They'll learn manners by watching me. (Duh!) ( )
  beautifulshell | Aug 27, 2020 |
Part 1 describes experiments by the author and others showing the contradictory feelings we have toward robots that mimic human interaction.
1. People quickly bond with the robots and tell them things they would not tell another person.
2. They are concerned about the lack interaction with real humans.
Part 2 gets into an exploration of human emotion.

There is a lot is this book that is still relevant. I have not attempted to make a complete summary, only noted a few things that especially caught my attention.

The field is changing rapidly, and we might not be able to change the direction society is going. [a:Joseph Weizenbaum|496834|Joseph Weizenbaum|https://images.gr-assets.com/authors/1354656881p2/496834.jpg] raised concerns, in his book [b:Computer Power and Human Reason: From Judgment to Calculation|986428|Computer Power and Human Reason From Judgment to Calculation|Joseph Weizenbaum|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1387751904l/986428._SY75_.jpg|971922], 1976. Meeting him in person I found him to be much less rabid that I expected. Some of the things he was concerned about have happened, and we hardly blinked. It all came on us gradually and we accepted the loss of privacy with hardly a whimper.

Late in life I worked with a beautiful young woman who announced that she was getting off Facebook. She has done that so many times in the last few years that I don’t bother to count. I couldn’t count even if I wanted to, for I am seldom on there. She is of that generation easily trapped into the allure of “social media”. But, it's not just young people who get trapped into the constant on of social media.

In the middle of the book Adam and his various in person and online gaming stages are described. His life and job are disintegrating, but he is doing nothing to prepare. This book does not concentrate on addiction. It is more concerned about are we really willing to give up personal human interaction?

“In fiction and in myth, human beings imagine themselves “playing God” and creating new forms of life. Now, in the real, sociable robots suggest a new dynamic. We have created something that we related to as an “other,” an equal, not something over which we wield godlike power. ... Because we reach for mutuality, we want them to care about us as we care for them. They can hurt us.” (Page 100 of 360)

“But people are capable of the higher standard of care that comes with empathy.” (Page 107)

“My own study of the networked life has left me thinking about intimacy — about being with people in person, hearing their voices and seeing their faces, trying to know their hearts. And it has left me thinking about solitude — the kind that refreshes and restores. Loneliness is failed solitude. To experience solitude you must be able to summon yourself by yourself; otherwise, you will only know how to be lonely.” (Page 288) ( )
  bread2u | Jul 1, 2020 |
Näyttää 1-5 (yhteensä 30) (seuraava | näytä kaikki)
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"Everything that deceives may be said to enchant."

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"I'm done with smart machines. I want a machine that's attentive to my needs. Where are the sensitive machines?"

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Thirty years ago, when I joined the faculty at MIT to study computer culture, the world retained a certain innocence.
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Englanninkielinen Wikipedia (7)

In "Alone Together," MIT technology and society professor Sherry Turkle explores the power of our new tools and toys to dramatically alter our social lives. It's a nuanced exploration of what we are looking for--and sacrificing--in a world of electronic companions and social networking tools, and an argument that, despite the hand-waving of today's self-described prophets of the future, it will be the next generation who will chart the path between isolation and connectivity.

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