Klobrien2 Karen O Books and Life in 2024 - Part 2

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Klobrien2 Karen O Books and Life in 2024 - Part 2

1klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 9, 3:50 pm



This is my dear, sweet gone-to-heaven husband Art. I miss him so incredibly much.

Welcome to my second 2024 “Books and Life” thread!

I've been with the 75-bookers for many years now, and I enjoy so much the camaraderie and book talk that happens here. I'm very glad to join with you all again!

The year 2023 was my annus horribilus; I lost my husband (the love of my life) at the end of March, and had scary health concerns in November. But through it all, reading has been an anchor and a beacon for my life. This Library Thing group has provided me a safe and loving place to be.

I’ve had great reading in 2023. I find myself reading pretty much as the spirit leads. I participate in the American Author Challenge, and plan to continue with them. A long-term project of mine is to accomplish reads from the "1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die" book, so that may guide my reading a little. Current 1001 Books count: 215.

What directs my reading more are my friends here on LT, so keep those recommendations coming!

This is my fifteenth year participating in the 75 Books Challenge. In 2009, I read 94 books; in 2010, I made it to 148!; 153 in 2011; 160 in 2012; 114 in 2013; 92 in 2014; 109 in 2015; 145 in 2016, 210 in 2017, 200 in 2018, 180 in 2019, 225 (3 x 75!) in 2020, 242 in 2021, 286 in 2022, 230 in 2023.

In addition to reading books, I've also discovered the world of Great Courses DVD lifelong learning courses. I love them! Below is a list of the courses I've completed, and I will try to always have at least one course going all the time.

A list of the Great Courses I have done can be found here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/331920

I've also begun some serious magazine reading, using my public library as source once again. I keep track of and read some fifteen magazines, on a range of topics: science, quilting, nature, birding, cats, news, etc.

I read two daily newspapers (St. Paul Pioneer Press and the Minneapolis Star Tribune), and I also read a lot of daily newsletters from the NYTimes.

Here's where I'll list the books I read (the number at the end of each line represents the post number where I listed the book).

MY FIRST THREAD:

The books I read in January:

1. Traveling Light: Poem by Linda Pastan
2. A Dog Runs Through It by Linda Pastan
3. An American Story by Kwame Alexander, art by Dare Coulter
4. There Was a Party for Langston by Jason Reynolds, art by Jerome Pumphrey and Jarrett Pumphrey
5. A Walk in the Woods by Nikki Grimes, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney and Brian Pickney
6. The Witches' Tree (Agatha Raisin #28) by M. C. Beaton
7. The Dead Ringer (Agatha Raisin #28) by M. C. Beaton
8. You Nest Here With Me by Jane Yolen and Heidi E. Y Stemple, ill. Melissa Sweet
9. The Iridescence of Birds: A Book About Henri Matisse by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Hadley Hooper
10. Cat Kid Comic Club Influencers (Cat Kid Comic Club #5) by Dav Pilkey
11. The Silkworm (Cormoran Strike #2) by Robert Galbraith
12. My Everyday Lagos: Nigerian Cooking at Home and in the Diaspora by Yewande Kololafe
13. The Little Match Girl Strikes Back by Emma Carroll, illuminated by Lauren Childs
14. Dinner in One: Exceptional and Easy One-Pan Meals by Melissa Clark
15. Beating About the Bush by M. C. Beaton
16. Mary Who Wrote Frankenstein by Linda Bailey, ill. Julia Sarda
17. Christmas Tapestry by Patricia Polacco
18. Coyote's Wild Home by Lily Kingsolver and Barbara Kingsolver, painted by Paul Mirocha
19. In the Dark by Kate Hoefler, art by Corinna Luyken
20. Just One Little Light by Kat Yeh, ill. Isabelle Arsenault
21. Welcome Comfort by Patricia Polacco
22. Zilot & Other Rhymes by Bob Odenkirk, ill. Erin Odenkirk
23. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame, ill. Grahame Baker-Smith
24. She-Hulk Vol. 3: Girl Can't Help It by Rainbow Rowell
25. Collected Poems by Jane Kenyon
26. Without: Poems by Donald Hill
27. Watership Down: The Graphic Novel by Richard Adams, adapted and illustrated by James Sturn and Joe Sutphin
28. Eve's Diary (short story) by Mark Twain
29. Banned Books, Burned Books: Forbidden Literary Works (DVD Great Course) by Maureen Corrigan
30. The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, ill. Robert Lawson
31. Once I Ate a Pie by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest, ill. Katy Schneider
32. When Grandfather Flew by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Chris Sheban
33. Grief Is An Elephant by Tamara Ellis Smith, and Nancy Whiteside
34. Homeland of My Body: New & Selected Poems by Richard Blanco

The books I read in February:

35. Murder Most Royal (Her Majesty the Queen Investigates #3) by S. J. Bennett
36. My Indigo World by Rosa Sung Ji Chang
37. How to Catch a Star by Oliver Jeffers
38. How to Heal a Broken Wing by Bob Graham
39. A Good Cry: What We Learn from Tears and Laughter by Nikki Giovanni
40. Prince in Comics by Tony Laurenco, 16 illustrators
41. This Country: Searching for Home in (Very) Rural America by Navied Mahdavian

MY SECOND THREAD:

42. Hot to Trot (Agatha Raisin #31) by M. C. Beaton with R. W. Green -- 25
43. Three Men Out (Nero Wolfe #23) by Rex Stout -- 26
44. When I Was Your Age: Life Lessons, Funny Stories & Questionable Parenting Advice From a Professional Clown by Kenan Thompson -- 48
45. Sloth Slept On by Frann Preston-Gannon -- 49
46. Giraffes Can't Dance by Giles Andraea, ill. Guy Parker-Rees -- 49
47. Knight Owl by Christopher Denise -- 49
48. Ironheart Vol. !: Those With Courage -- 56
49. Cooking My Way: Recipes and Techniques for Economical Cooking by Jacques Pepin -- 60
50. So Late in the Day: Stories of Women and Men by Claire Keegan -- 64
51. Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet (Great Course) by John McWhorter -- 67
52. The Tucci Table: Cooking With Family and Friends by Stanley Tucci and Felicity Blunt -- 68
53. Down the Hatch (Agatha Raisin #32) by M. C. Beaton -- 77
54. Open Throat: A Novel by Henry Hoke -- 80
55. I Wonder If I'll See a Whale by Francis Ward Weller, ill. Ted Lewin -- 81
56. Little Red Riding Hood, adapted from The Brothers Grimm by Gennady Spirin -- 81
57. Ironheart, Vol. 2: Ten Rings by Eve L. Ewing -- 109
58. Ironheart: Riri Williams by Brian Michael Bendis -- 109
59. Artificial: A Love Story by Amy Kurzweil -- 110
60. Orbital: A Novel by Samantha Harvey -- 140
61. My Friend Earth by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Francesca Sanna -- 155
62. The Diaries of Adam and Eve and Other Stories by Mark Twain -- 179
63. Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing -- 189
64. Dream Within a Dream by Patricia MacLachlan -- 190
65. The Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World by Matt Kracht -- 216
66. The Moon's Almost Here by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Tomie de Paola -- 218
67. Before She Was Harriet by Leea Cline-Ransome, ill. James E. Ransome -- 218
68. Snowflakes Fall by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Steven Kellogg -- 218
69. The Journey by Francesca Sanna -- 218
70. The Tale of Tsar Saltan by Alexander Pushkin, paintings by Gennady Spirin -- 218
71. Before You Came by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest, ill David Diaz -- 218

The books I read in March:

72. Through Grandpa's Eyes by Patricia MacLachlan, pictures by Deborah Ray --246
73. My Father's Words by Patricia MacLachlan -- 246
74. Devil's Delight by M. C. Beaton and R. W. Green -- 254
75. Classic Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, adapted by Valeria Manferto, ill. Francesca Rossi -- 279
76. Zin! Zin! Zin!: A Violin by Lloyd Moss, ill. Marjorie Priceman -- 289
77. I Am Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Brad Meltzer, ill. Christopher Eliopoulos -- 289
78. Wildful by Kengo Kurimoto -- 289
79. All the Places to Love by Patricia MacLachlan, paintings by Mike Wimmer -- 289
80. Snow White and Rose Red by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, trans. May Sellars, ill. Gennady Spirin -- 289

Here is where I'll list the authors selected for the 2024 American Authors Challenge, the books I will read, and if I complete them (here's hoping!)

JANUARY: Mark Twain -- Read Eve's Diary -- COMPLETED
FEBRUARY: Susan Sontag -- not going to read
MARCH: Truman Capote -- Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories
APRIL: General Non-Fiction with host Caroline Caroline_McElwee
MAY: William Maxwell
JUNE: Queer Authors with host Dr. Laura Koons lycomayflower
JULY: Susan Power a/k/a Mona Susan Power
AUGUST: Jeffrey Lent
SEPTEMBER: Living American authors who were born outside the US but adopted this country as their home.
OCTOBER: Katharine Anne Porter
NOVEMBER: Jewish American Authors with host Kristel kristelh
DECEMBER: The Heartland (regional authors from the middle of the country)
WILD CARD: 2015 Redux Pick an author from the 2015 Challenge
EXTRA POINTS CHALLENGE
(Complete the challenge by reading at least one work from the author or category featured each month AND one work from the Wildcard list each month.)

My 2003 "Books Read" list (casually kept, and probably incomplete): http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2003-reading-list.html
My 2004 "Books Read" list (see above caveats: things get better!):
http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2004-reading-list.html
My 2005 "Books Read" list (most pathetic list yet): http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2005-reading-list.html
My 2006 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2006-reading-list.htm
My 2007 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2007-reading-list.html
My 2008 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2008-reading-list.html
My 2009 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2009-reading-list.html
My 2010 "Books Read" list : http://librata.blogspot.com/2012/04/karens-2010-reading-list.html

Here is a link to my last thread from 2011: http://www.librarything.com/topic/122919

Here is a link to my last thread from 2012: http://www.librarything.com/topic/138897

Here is a link to my last thread from 2013:
http://www.librarything.com/topic/156012

Here is a link to my thread from 2014: http://www.librarything.com/topic/163564

Here is a link to my thread from 2015: https://www.librarything.com/topic/186139

Here is a link to my thread from 2016: http://www.librarything.com/topic/211096

Here is a link to my last thread from 2017: http://www.librarything.com/topic/268142#

Here is a link to my last thread from 2018: https://www.librarything.com/topic/298557

Here is a link to my one-and-only thread from 2019: https://www.librarything.com/topic/301738

The books I've read in the first half of 2020 (115 of them) are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/314888

The books I read in the second half of 2020 are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/322010#

The books I read in the first half of 2021 are here:
https://www.librarything.com/topic/328372#

The books I read in the second half of 2021 are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/333390#

The books I read in the first quarter of 2022 are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/338204#n7791489

The books I read in April and May of 2022 are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/340601#n7851702

The books I read in June, July, part of August of 2022 are here: https://www.librarything.com/topic/342092#

The books I read in August through part of October of 2022 are here:
https://www.librarything.com/topic/343494#n7961305

The books I read from October to the end of year are here:
https://www.librarything.com/topic/345382#

Good reading to you!

2Owltherian
helmikuu 5, 6:27 pm

Happy new thread Karen!

3klobrien2
helmikuu 5, 6:31 pm

I do a "Reading Roundup" every Friday. Here's last week's:

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (02/02/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Three Men Out (Nero Wolfe #23) by Rex Stout -- p. 56 of 154 (1 of 3 stories)
When I Was Your Age by Keenan Thompson -- p. 53 of 226
Hot to Trot (Agatha Raisin #31) by M. C. Beaton -- p. 27 of 235
Prince: In Comics (graphic) by Tony Laurenco -- p. 34 of 165
Orbital: A Novel by Samantha Harvey
The Puzzlemaster by Danielle Trussoni
Open Throat by Henry Hoke
This Country: Searching for Home in (Very) Rural America by Navied Mahdavian
The Outsiders by S. E. Hinton
A Good Cry by Nikki Giovanni
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 0 of 193
The Tucci Table by Stanley Tucci
Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Adventures of Isabel (Epitome Apartments #1) by Candas Jane Dorsey
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld -- p. 20 of 300
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In February 24, we are reading Susan Sontag. I plan to read On Photography.

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Course is Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter -- I've read/watched 5 of 18 episodes.

4richardderus
helmikuu 5, 6:33 pm

New thread orisons, Karen O.! *smooch*

5PaulCranswick
helmikuu 5, 7:42 pm

I am always touched when I read your thread renewals. Art was a lucky man to have someone love him so dearly.

Happy new thread, Karen.

6drneutron
helmikuu 5, 8:15 pm

Happy new one, Karen!

7figsfromthistle
helmikuu 5, 8:17 pm

Happy new thread :)

8atozgrl
helmikuu 6, 12:10 am

Happy new thread, Karen. What a great start of reading for this year!

9vancouverdeb
helmikuu 6, 9:40 am

Happy New Thread, Karen.

10katiekrug
helmikuu 6, 9:48 am

Happy new one, Karen!

11klobrien2
helmikuu 6, 10:04 am

>2 Owltherian: >4 richardderus: >5 PaulCranswick: >6 drneutron: >7 figsfromthistle: >8 atozgrl: >9 vancouverdeb: >10 katiekrug: Hello, everyone! Thank you so much for your warm words of welcome for my new thread! I am so glad to have you stop by!

12Owltherian
helmikuu 6, 10:06 am

Your very welcome Karen!

13klobrien2
helmikuu 6, 10:24 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Kitchen duty (cook a few things). Empty a “Mom book.” Make a few appts. Household accounts.

Reading: Finished “This Country” (great book!), Three Men Out (finish today?), Hot to Trot (100 pages left)

Magazines: Nope, and they’re starting to stack up.

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: So good! McWhorter is such a good communicator and so funny! Read/watched 3 lectures: 6. The Advent of A, E, and O, 7. Lost at “C”, 8. The History of “H.”

Grief reading.

Watching: Online church service rescued from technical difficulties, so I had church on Monday! Started DVD “Stop Making Sense,” the landmark “Talking Heads” show. Watched “Inspector Morse” 7.1 (Ian McNeice as the pathologist, Brian Cox as a suspect, and Colon Dexter (author of the books) with a very small speaking part).

14klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 6, 10:33 am

Struggled a little today…the solution word is very fitting.

Wordle 962 5/6 irate, blind, quick, spicy, which

🟦⬜⬜⬜⬜
⬜⬜🟧⬜⬜
⬜⬜🟧🟧⬜
⬜⬜🟧🟧⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: which (pron.)
Old English hwilc (West Saxon, Anglian), hwælc (Northumbrian) "which," short for hwi-lic "of what form," from Proto-Germanic *hwa-lik- (source also of Old Saxon hwilik, Old Norse hvelikr, Swedish vilken, Old Frisian hwelik, Middle Dutch wilk, Dutch welk, Old High German hwelich, German welch, Gothic hvileiks "which"), from *hwi- "who" (from PIE root *kwo-, stem of relative and interrogative pronouns) + *likan "body, form" (source also of Old English lic "body;" see like (adj.)). In Middle English used as a relative pronoun where Modern English would use who, as still in the Lord's Prayer. Old English also had parallel forms hwelc and hwylc, which disappeared 15c.

15klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 6, 10:38 am

From Poem-a-day (a la Mark (msf59)):

“Eschatology” by Eve L. Ewing

i’m confident that the absolute dregs of possibility for this society,
the sugary coffee mound at the bottom of this cup,
our last best hope that when our little bit of assigned plasma implodes
it won’t go down as a green mark in the cosmic ledger,
lies in the moment when you say hello to a bus driver
and they say it back—

when someone holds the door open for you
and you do a little jog to meet them where they are—

walking my dog, i used to see this older man
and whenever I said good morning,
he replied ‘GREAT morning’—

in fact, all the creative ways our people greet each other
may be the icing on this flaming trash cake hurtling through the ether.

when the clerk says how are you
and i say ‘i’m blessed and highly favored’

i mean my toes have met sand, and wiggled in it, a lot.
i mean i have laughed until i choked and a friend slapped my back.
i mean my niece wrote me a note: ‘you are so smart + intellajet’

i mean when we do go careening into the sun,

i’ll miss crossing guards ushering the grown folks too, like ducklings
and the lifeguards at the community pool and
men who yelled out the window that they’d fix the dent in my car,
right now! it’d just take a second—

and actually everyone who tried to keep me alive, keep me afloat,
and if not unblemished, suitably repaired.

but I won’t feel too sad about it,
becoming a star

16klobrien2
helmikuu 6, 11:05 am

Connections
Puzzle #240
🟩🟩🟩🟩 euphemisms for flatulence (gas, stinker, toot, wind
🟨🟨🟦🟨
🟦🟦🟦🟦 kinds of blond (dirty, honey, platinum, strawberry)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 ostentatious, as an outfit (bright, flashy, garish, loud)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 what “O” might mean (hug, of, oxygen, zero)

17BLBera
helmikuu 6, 12:33 pm

Happy new thread, Karen. There's always so much going on here.

18Kristelh
helmikuu 6, 2:37 pm

Happy new thread, Karen.

19klobrien2
helmikuu 7, 8:52 am

>17 BLBera: >18 Kristelh: Thank for the kind words! You are so welcome here.

20Owltherian
helmikuu 7, 8:59 am

Hi Karen! How are you?

21klobrien2
helmikuu 7, 9:03 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Kitchen duty (cook a few things). Empty a “Mom book.” Make a few appts. Household accounts.

Reading: Finished “Hot to Trot.” Three Men Out—will finish today. I have a few cookbooks that I’d like to get started on today—The Tucci Table and Cooking My Way by Jacques Pepin.

Magazines: American Patchwork and Quilting (Dec 2023), Consumer Reports (February)

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: None today

Grief reading.

Watching. Finished “Stop Making Sense,” the landmark “Talking Heads” concert film. Great film, great music! Watched first episode of “Feud: Capote versus the Swans” (pretty good, soap-opera-ey).

22klobrien2
helmikuu 7, 9:19 am

Wordle 963 3/6 irate, tamer, after

⬜🟦🟦🟦🟦
🟦🟦⬜🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: after (adv., prep.)
Old English æfter "behind; later in time" (adv.); "behind in place; later than in time; in pursuit, following with intent to overtake" (prep.), from of "off" (see off (adv.)) + -ter, a comparative suffix; thus the original meaning was "more away, farther off." Compare Old Norse eptir "after," Old Frisian efter, Dutch achter, Old High German aftar, Gothic aftra "behind;" also see aft. Cognate with Greek apotero "farther off," Old Persian apataram "further."
From c. 1300 as "in imitation of." As a conjunction, "subsequent to the time that," from late Old English. After hours "hours after regular working hours" is from 1814. Afterwit "wisdom that comes too late" is attested from c. 1500 but seems to have fallen from use. After you as an expression in yielding precedence is recorded by 1650.

23Owltherian
helmikuu 7, 9:20 am

I got wordle and i'm enjoying it a lot!

24klobrien2
helmikuu 7, 9:40 am

Connections
Puzzle #241
🟩🟩🟩🟩 basic two-dimensional shapes (circle, diamond, square, triangle)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 boxing maneuvers (bob, cross, hook, weave)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 sea creatures (crab, ray, sponge, squid)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 fancy ____ (feast, free, pants, that)

25klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 7, 5:56 pm



42.
Hot to Trot (Agatha Raisin #31) by M. C. Beaton (with R. W. Green)



R. W. Green becomes the new author of this series. Lovely inscription to M. C. Beaton. This book deals with "the horsey crowd," and they are a mixture of nice ones and some very nasty ones. There are visits to horse farms and stables, and France! I liked this one because nothing really implausible happens (ha!) Only a few left in the series--a new one is due out this year.

26klobrien2
helmikuu 7, 5:54 pm



43.
Three Men Out (Nero Wolfe #23) by Rex Stout



I've had this one checked out from Libby for months! It's not a long book (actually, three novellas), but other books would lead me astray. I really enjoyed the read once I set my mind to it.

So there are three novellas: (1) Invitation to Murder, (2) The Zero Clue, (3) This Won't Kill You. The last one was my favorite: set in the team locker room of a World Series team, where drugging (attempted game fixing) and murder has occurred. All of the novellas are good.

27klobrien2
helmikuu 8, 9:15 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Kitchen duty (deal with produce, make a few things). Go through books for donations.

Reading: Three Men Out—finished. Artificial: A Love Story started—really interesting graphic book. Also started Cooking My Way, another beautiful cookbook by Jacques Pepin.

Magazines: American Patchwork and Quilting (Feb 2024), New Yorker.

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: 9. The Inception of I and Its Journey to J, 10. The Quirks and Zigzags of Q and Z.

Grief reading.

Watching. Watched second episode of “Feud: Capote Versus the Swans.”

28FAMeulstee
helmikuu 8, 9:40 am

Happy new thread, Karen!
Your reading numbers are amazing.

29richardderus
helmikuu 8, 9:53 am

>27 klobrien2: Very interesting Great Course, Karen O. I think McWhorter is a terrifically amusing and informative writer, which *can* bode well for him as a speaker...but not always, so I hope this is one of those times.

Happy Thursday! *smooch*

30klobrien2
helmikuu 8, 10:15 am

>29 richardderus: McWhorter is just amazing here. He’ll break into song to illustrate a point (has a great singing voice) or state his disdain for common practice (like calling a date by its location “in the nth century” which is confusing—why not just say “in the 1800s” rather than “in the nineteenth century”). He’s having a lot of fun with this one, and the information he’s teaching is so interesting to me!

Happy Thursday to you, too!

31klobrien2
helmikuu 8, 10:19 am

>28 FAMeulstee: I’m a little startled by the numbers, but a lot of those books are picture books or graphics (which read faster). And some of the books I’ve been working on for a while (like the just-finished Three Men Out). I’m just loving my reading, so I’ll just keep counting and enjoying.

Thanks for your warm wishes!

32klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 8, 10:25 am

Wordle 964 4/6 irate, blade, flame, place)

⬜⬜🟧⬜🟧
⬜🟧🟧⬜🟧
⬜🟧🟧⬜🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: place (n.)
c. 1200, "space, dimensional extent, room, area," from Old French place "place, spot" (12c.) and directly from Medieval Latin placea "place, spot," from Latin platea "courtyard, open space; broad way, avenue," from Greek plateia (hodos) "broad (way)," fem. of platys "broad," from PIE root *plat- "to spread."
Replaced Old English stow and stede. From mid-13c. as "particular part of space, extent, definite location, spot, site;" from early 14c. as "position or place occupied by custom, etc.; precedence, priority in rank or dignity; social status, position on some social scale;" from late 14c. as "inhabited place, town, country," also "place on the surface of something, portion of something, part." Meaning "a situation, appointment, or employment" is by 1550s. Meaning "group of houses in a town" is from 1580s.
Also from the same Latin source are Italian piazza, Catalan plassa, Spanish plaza, Middle Dutch plaetse, Dutch plaats, German Platz, Danish plads, Norwegian plass. The word appears via the Bible in Old English (Old Northumbrian plaece, plaetse "an open place in a city"), but the modern word is a reborrowing.
Sense of "a mansion with its adjoining grounds" is from mid-14c.; that of "building or part of a building set apart for some purpose is by late 15c. (in place of worship). Meaning "a broad way, square, or open space in a city or town," often having some particular use or character (Park Place, Waverly Place, Rillington Place) is by 1690s, from a sense in French. Its wide application in English covers meanings that in French require three words: place, lieu, and endroit. Cognate Italian piazza and Spanish plaza retain more of the etymological sense.
To take place "happen, come to pass, be accomplished" (mid-15c., earlier have place, late 14c.), translates French avoir lieu. To know (one's) place "know how to behave in a manner befitting one's rank, situation, etc." is from c. 1600, from the "social status" sense; hence the figurative expression put (someone) in his or her place (1855). In in the first place, etc., it has the sense of "point or degree in order of proceeding" (1630s). Out of place "not properly adjusted or placed in relation to other things" is by 1520s. All over the place "in disorder" is attested from 1923.
also from c. 1200
place (v.)
mid-15c., placen, "to determine the position of;" also "to put (something) in a particular place or position," from place (n.). The meaning "put or set (a number of things) in position or order, arrange" is from 1540s. Related: Placed; placing.
Sense of "to find a home, situation, marriage, etc. for" is from 1590s. The horse racing sense of "to achieve a certain position" (usually in the top three finishers; in U.S., specifically second place) is attested by 1924, from earlier meaning "to state the position of" (among the first three finishers), 1826.

33klobrien2
helmikuu 8, 11:20 am

Connections
Puzzle #242
🟨🟩🟦🟪haha! One of each!
🟩🟩🟩🟩 card games (bridge, gin, spit, war)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 wallop (belt, clock, deck, slug)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 archery equipment (arrow, bow, quiver, target)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 classic tattoos (anchor, dragon, heart, rose)

34klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 9, 9:41 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Get valentines ready to mail to my loved ones!

Reading: Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club—really like it so far. This is my “in memory of rosalita” read.

Magazines: NYT Magazine (1/21, 1/28), NYT Book Review (1/28)

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: Nope

Grief reading.

Watching. Monarch: Legacy of Monsters episode 2 (making a little more sense!). episodes of starting-up-again network shows: The Connors, Abbot Elementary, Not Dead Yet. Watched “Feud: Capote Versus the Swans” episode 2.3.

35klobrien2
helmikuu 9, 10:06 am

Wordle 965 3/6 irate, stick, stiff

🟦⬜⬜🟦⬜
🟧🟧🟧⬜⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: Another word that has multiple forms! stiff (adj.)
Middle English stif, from Old English stif "rigid, inflexible, not easily bent," in physical senses often suggesting rigor mortis, from Proto-Germanic *stifaz "inflexible" (source also of Dutch stijf, Old Frisian stef, Old High German stif, German steif "stiff;" Old Norse stifla "choke").
The Germanic word is said to be from a PIE *stipos-, from the root *steip- "press together, pack, cram" (source also of Sanskrit styayate "coagulates," stima "slow;" Greek stia, stion "small stone," steibo "press together;" Latin stipare "pack down, compress," perhaps also stipes "post, tree trunk;" Lithuanian stipti "to stiffen, grow rigid," stiprus "strong;" Old Church Slavonic stena "wall"). However Boutkan suggests the possibility that the Germanic words are a metaphoric use from words for staff (n.).
By extension, "strong, violent; difficult to master or overcome:" In reference to battles and competitions, "fierce, stubborn, contested," mid-13c.; of winds or currents c. 1300; of liquor from 1813. In Middle English also "powerful, staunch, unmoving, resolute," and paired alliteratively with strong.
Of substances, "not fluid, thick and tenacious," early 15c. As "not natural or easy in movement," c. 1300. As "rigidly ceremonious, not easy or gracious in manner," c. 1600. To keep a stiff upper lip is attested from 1815. Related: Stiffly.
stiff (n.)
1859, "corpse, dead body," slang, from stiff (adj.) which had been associated with notion of rigor mortis since c. 1200.
The meaning "working man" is recorded by 1930, from the earlier general sense of "contemptible person," but sometimes merely "man, fellow," with suggestions of roughness (1882). The slang meaning "something or someone bound to lose" is 1890 (originally of racehorses), from the notion of "corpse." The meaning "drunkard" is by 1907.
also from 1859
stiff (v.)
late 14c., stiffen, "to make stiff," from stiff (adj.). The transitive meaning "fail to tip" is by 1934, American English, originally among restaurant and hotel workers, probably a new formation from stiff (n.) in some sense, perhaps in slang sense of "corpse" (because the dead pay no tips), or from the "contemptible person" sense. Extended by 1950 to "to cheat."

36klobrien2
helmikuu 9, 10:09 am

From Poem-a-day:

Nodes of Growth

Cherise Pollard

for Molly Peacock

My mother thinks she cannot grow
orchids: the initial blooms shrivel,
turn to dust on the window ledge.
The stalk, once green, becomes
a dry stick, soon appraised
for the same value she gives
every crinkled brown leaf:

She cut it off.

She did not know to wait
to examine turgid base leaves,
jungle vibrant, roots brimming
the pot’s rim, testing the drainage holes,
seeking sun, trickling water.

It must work harder now
to bloom once the stem
has been removed.

At middle age, I appreciate
the orchid’s beauty: its shy blooms
burst from a dead stick:
nodes of growth emerge
as tender youth did once.

I got my first orchid at fifty. I was
unable to accept the end of my body’s
usefulness. The aura of attraction
shriveled, I secretly
cheered for the orchid
whose tender nodes explode
unexpected, fighting
against our assumption that
beauty only bursts from
the sweet young green.

37richardderus
helmikuu 9, 10:44 am

>35 klobrien2: 1950! Wow, that late. I think this one has more senses still, but OE is squeamish about them....

Friday *smooch*

38klobrien2
helmikuu 9, 1:33 pm

Connections
Puzzle #243
🟩🟩🟩🟩 broadcast (air, run, screen, show)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 music player buttons (rewind, shuffle, skip, stop)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 things you can draw (bath, card, curtain, picture)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 number anagrams (eon, ether, net, tow)

39klobrien2
helmikuu 9, 6:42 pm

I do a "Reading Roundup" every Friday. Here's last week's:

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (02/09/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Orbital: A Novel by Samantha Harvey -- p. 5 of 207
Artificial: A Love Story by Amy Kurzweil -- p. 39 0f 355
Cooking My Way: Recipes & Techniques for Economical Cooking by Jacques Pepin -- p. 36 of 263
Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club by J. Ryan Stradal -- p. 15 of 355
The Puzzlemaster by Danielle Trussoni -- p. 0 of 343
Open Throat by Henry Hoke -- p. 15 of 160
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 0 of 193
The Tucci Table by Stanley Tucci
Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Adventures of Isabel (Epitome Apartments #1) by Candas Jane Dorsey
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld -- p. 20 of 300
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In February 24, we are reading Susan Sontag. I plan to read On Photography.

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Course is Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter -- I've read/watched 10 of 16 episodes.

40vancouverdeb
helmikuu 9, 9:29 pm

Well, you are overbooked, but I just got a book that might interest you, Karen. It's a book about word origins, linguistic quirks and the like. It looks like a fun read and if you library has it, it might be worth a read. It's called Like, Literally, Dude.

41PaulCranswick
helmikuu 9, 10:12 pm

>39 klobrien2: Wow, Karen. Is that really 22 books you have currently on the go?

42klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 10, 9:42 am

>40 vancouverdeb: Ooh, that looks good! I’ll search it out. Thanks!

P.s. I’ve got it requested, but looks like I have a bit if a wait ahead of me. That’s fine, I think I have enough books to read!

Thanks for stopping by to chat!

43klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 11, 11:30 am

>41 PaulCranswick: It would be more accurate to just count the books that have a “number of pages read” tagged. Under “Actively Reading” there are just a handful. Add on my AAC read and my Great Course for a total of seven.

The others are listed so that I will keep them in mind and don’t lose track of them. I’m a list-maker, I guess.

Have a great weekend, and thanks for stopping by!

44Owltherian
helmikuu 10, 9:41 am

Hello Karen!

45klobrien2
helmikuu 10, 9:54 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Get valentines ready to mail to my loved ones!

Reading: Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club, Cooking My Way, When I Was Your Age (I was going to give up on this one, but it drew me back in, and I ended up finishing it. Good book!)

Magazines: Minnesota History, 5 issues. I have to have the librarians request this one for me (a glitch in the system) and I had let it go. Now I only have the current issue left to catch up on (when it comes to me).

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: 11. The Ramblings of R, 12. The Unfolding of U, V, W, and F.

Grief reading.

Watching. Watched episodes of last year’s shows that I had let sit—The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning and The Reluctant Traveler (Eugene Levy). Both are really good shows, so I’ll seek to watch more.

46klobrien2
helmikuu 10, 9:54 am

47klobrien2
helmikuu 10, 10:17 am

Wordle 966 3/6 irate, pried, fried

🟦🟧⬜⬜🟦
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: fried (adj.)
mid-14c., past-participle adjective from fry (v.). Fried chicken attested by 1832.
also from mid-14c.
Entries linking to fried

fry (v.)
late 13c., "cook (something) in a shallow pan over a fire," from Old French frire "to fry" (13c.), from Latin frigere "to roast or fry," from PIE *bher- "to cook, bake" (source also of Sanskrit bhrjjati "roasts," bharjanah "roasting;" Persian birishtan "to roast;" perhaps also Greek phrygein "to roast, bake"). Intransitive sense is from late 14c. U.S. slang meaning "execute in the electric chair" is U.S. slang from 1929. As a noun, "fried meat," from 1630s. Related: Fried; frying. Frying pan is recorded from mid-14c. (friing panne).

48klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 10, 3:17 pm



44.
When I Was Your Age: Life Lessons, Funny Stories & Questionable Parenting Advice From a Professional Clown by Kenan Thompson



I had gotten maybe 100 pages into this book, and it was dragging a bit for me. I had decided to just skim through and be done with it, but I got up in the book and the really pretty interesting autobiography.

I've always thought of Kenan Thompson as a really funny guy, but the person that this book describes is a really nice person, too. And interesting!

The last lines of the book: "On a day to day basis for the last two decades, I've gotten to laugh with the greatest comedians of our time. And I'm considered one of them now, too. I feel so lucky to have had a front row seat on one of the greatest shows in television history." (SNL)

A little extra treat--"Come Back Barack" on Youtube. Thompson wrote this. It's as funny (in a desperate kind of way) now as it was back in 2020.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZkPSbp3zTfo

49klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 10, 3:39 pm

And, now, this week's picture books! Courtesy of recommendations from whisper1 and norabelle414! Thank you, fellow picture book aficionados!



45.
Sloth Slept On by Frann Preston-Gannon



Beautifully-drawn, and so funny! I can just imagine the hilarity as young readers spot all sorts of clues about the sloth and the kids in the book don't catch on.



46.
Giraffes Can't Dance by Giles Andreae, ill. Guy Parker-Rees



Lovely, lovely book. Colorful, vibrant animals (even insects), all with great expressions and dance moves! Even Gerald the Giraffe will get to show his stuff at the end.

"Then he raised hi head and looked up at the moon and stars above. 'We all can dance,' he said, 'When we find music that we love.'"



47.
Knight Owl by Christopher Denise



Charming and beautiful illustrations (knights in armor! horses! dragons!), great story about courage and friendship. "Full of wordplay and optimism, this surprising display of bravery proves that cleverness (and friendship) can rule over brawn." (book blurb)

p.s. Owl gets put on the "Knight Night Watch"--that phrase cracks me up!

50AMQS
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 10, 8:15 pm

Happy new thread, Karen. I love Knight Owl - I think I'll get it for my little nephew who turns 5 in May.

51klobrien2
helmikuu 10, 8:46 pm

>50 AMQS: Lovely! Knight Owl is so beautifully charming! And it has dragons!

Thanks for stopping by!

52vancouverdeb
helmikuu 11, 2:09 am

>49 klobrien2: Well, your picture book, Sloth Slept On describes me today. It was one of those days where I just felt really tired, and had a touch of vertigo, which has disappeared now. But sleeping was my favourite activity today. I did walk the dog because Dave was at work, but that was about it.

53klobrien2
helmikuu 11, 11:19 am

>52 vancouverdeb: Hope you’re feeling better today, Deb! Sleep was undoubtedly the best thing for you. Thanks for stopping by!

54klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 11, 11:31 am

Puzzles and papers and LT! Mobility exercises. Get valentines ready to mail to my loved ones! Online church this morning.

Reading: Cooking My Way, Ironheart Vol. 1, Down the Hatch (Agatha Raisin), lovely picture books (3)

Magazines: Scientific American (January)

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: nope

Grief reading.

Watching. An episode of The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning and Inspector Morse 7.2 (Keith Allen (Sheriff of Nottingham in the Robin Hood series) and Harriet Walter (Lord Peter Wimsey’s Harriet, and Rebecca’s mom in Ted Lasso)) guested.

55klobrien2
helmikuu 11, 12:12 pm

Wordle 967 5/6 Guessy-guessy! irate, merry, leper, defer, never

⬜🟦⬜⬜🟦
⬜🟧🟦⬜⬜
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: never (adv.)
Middle English never, from Old English næfre "not ever, at no time," a compound of ne "not, no" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + æfre "ever" (see ever). Early used as an emphatic form of not (as still in never mind). Old English, unlike its modern descendant, had the useful custom of attaching ne to words to create their negatives, as in nabban for na habban "not to have."
Italian giammai, French jamais, Spanish jamas are from Latin iam "already" + magis "more;" thus literally "at any time, ever," originally with a negative, but this has been so thoroughly absorbed in sense as to be formally omitted.
Phrase never say die "don't despair" is from 1818. Never Never Land is first attested in Australia as a name for the uninhabited northern part of Queensland (1884), perhaps so called because anyone who had gone there once never wished to return. Meaning "imaginary, illusory or utopian place" is attested by 1900 in American English. J.M. Barrie's use of the full form for the island home of the Lost Boys is by 1905.

56klobrien2
helmikuu 11, 3:36 pm



48.
Ironheart Vol. 1: Those With Courage by Eve L. Ewing



I love this graphic! I think the whole concept is just terrific, and the execution of it here is wonderful. Going off to look for Volume 2!

57BLBera
helmikuu 12, 10:38 am

Giraffes Can't Dance was a favorite with my granddaughter, Karen. What a happy book!

58klobrien2
helmikuu 12, 11:10 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things.

Reading: Cooking My Way, Ironheart Vol. 1, Down the Hatch (Agatha Raisin)

Magazines: nope

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: nope

Grief reading.

Watching. Puppy Bowl from time to time. Inspector Morse 7.3 (John Gielgud, Robert Hardy, Brian Bovell (apartment doorman on “C B Strike), and Rachel Weisz in one of her first ever TV roles).

59klobrien2
helmikuu 12, 11:50 am

Wordle 968 3/6 irate, quota, pasta

⬜⬜🟦🟧⬜
⬜⬜⬜🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: pasta (n.)
a generic name for Italian dough-based foods such as spaghetti, macaroni, etc., 1874, but not common in English until after World War II, from Italian pasta, from Late Latin pasta "dough, pastry cake, paste," from Greek pasta "barley porridge," probably originally "a salted mess of food," from neuter plural of pastos (adj.) "sprinkled, salted," from passein "to sprinkle," from PIE root *kwet- "to shake" (see quash).

60klobrien2
helmikuu 12, 4:33 pm



49.
Cooking My Way: Recipes and Techniques for Economical Cooking by Jacques Pepin



Great cookbook with an interesting and useful premise. Stuffed with lots of good-looking recipes and techniques for all sectors of the cooking menu. And this book is wonderfully beautiful: it's filled with Pepin's paintings and drawings, and this guy is really good. The book is a feast for the eyes, with its clear, vibrant colors (see that blue on the cover?)

61klobrien2
helmikuu 13, 9:39 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things.

Reading: Finished Cooking My Way and So Late in the Day. Read some Open Throat, Electric Arches, Diaries of Adam and Eve, Down the Hatch (Agatha Raisin)

Magazines: nope

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: nope

Grief reading.

Watching. Inspector Morse 8.1, Daily Show (Jon Stewart is back on Mondays).

62klobrien2
helmikuu 13, 9:43 am

Wordle 969 4/6 irate, sharp, savor, scram

⬜🟦🟦⬜⬜
🟧⬜🟦🟦⬜
🟧🟦⬜⬜🟦
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymology.com: scram (v.)
"depart quickly," often as an interjection, 1928, U.S. slang, either a shortened form of scramble (v.) or from German schramm, imperative singular of schrammen "depart," which is of uncertain origin. Said to be another coinage of U.S. sportswriter and Variety magazine staffer Jack "Con" Conway (1898-1928). Related: Scrammed; scramming.
also from 1928
Entries linking to scram

scramble (v.)
1580s (intransitive), "make one's way by clambering, etc., struggle or wriggle along," also "strive with others or jostle and grasp rudely for a share or for mastery;" a word of obscure origin, perhaps a nasalized variant of scrabble (v.) "to struggle; to scrape quickly." OED points to dialectal scramb "pull together with the hands," a variant of scramp, which is probably a nasalized form of scrape.
Mrs. Goddard was the mistress of a school, ... a real, honest, old fashioned boarding-school, where a reasonable quantity of accomplishments were sold at a reasonable price, and where girls might be sent to be out of the way, and scramble themselves into a little education, without any danger of coming back prodigies. Jane Austen, "Emma"
The transitive sense of "to stir or toss together randomly, cause to move confusedly" is from 1822. The transitive sense, in reference to radio signals, telephone voices, etc., "to make unintelligible," is attested from 1927, hence generally "to jumble, muddle." In U.S. football, in reference to a quarterback avoiding tacklers, by 1964. Related: Scrambled; scrambling. Scrambled eggs, broken into a pan, mixed with butter, salt, pepper, etc., and cooked slowly, is by 1843.

63richardderus
helmikuu 13, 11:09 am

What a weird word to choose today! It made me smile, but I can imagine the UK contingent is getting their knickers in a knot over it.

Snowbound *smooch*

64klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 13, 11:18 am



50.
So Late in the Day: Stories of Women and Men by Claire Keegan



A set of three short stories, all three with a different take on the "stories of women and men" theme of the title.

1. So Late in the Day (kind of a lament about Irish men and their attitudes toward women?)
2. The Long and Painful Death (woman author on a writing retreat)
3. Antarctica (woman on a spree)

The writing, as with all of the Keegan things I've read, is sweet and succinct. Not a wasted word, it seems. But these stories are dark and unhopeful. I really enjoyed the reading, but they left a sense of gloom and sadness with me. Had to go read a "snackbook," quick! (tip of the hat to weird_o).

65The_Hibernator
helmikuu 13, 11:53 am

I read Diaries of Adam and Eve. Twain is very amusing.

66klobrien2
helmikuu 13, 4:24 pm

>65 The_Hibernator: He is! I read an older copy of Eve's Diary and it had charming little illustrations that made it come to life. So far, I've seen no cute little drawings in this book, but I'm enjoying it even so.

Thanks for stopping by!

67klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 13, 4:37 pm



51.
Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet (Great Course) by John McWhorter



Well, I love Great Courses, and I would read/watch any Great Course done by John McWhorter--he's just that good. He's brilliant, a great communicator, and he's so funny!

I learned so much from this course, about something so basic to languages--the alphabet. McWhorter and other creators used clever visuals along with the teacher's words to make this kind-of-dry topic...interesting.

"Even as reading alone became more common, people would still read aloud, even to themselves. Silent reading eventually became the custom, but until then, mumbling readers made for noisy libraries." Can you imagine?! This cracks me up.
'
16 lectures of 30 minutes each.

Turns out that this is the 50th Great Course that I have completed! That blows my mind. There have been only a few that I haven't enjoyed completely. I borrowed all of them from my local library.

68klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 13, 6:54 pm



52.
The Tucci Table: Cooking with Family and Friends by Stanley Tucci and Felicity Blunt



Lots of great recipes, techniques, and name-dropping make this cookbook a lot of fun to read. When I read the cookbooks, first I read: whatever prose and pictures the author has included for the recipe; then, the list of ingredients in the recipe; finally, the steps of the recipe. It's a really sensory type of reading; I can almost smell the food cooking at times.

This book contains a lot of English recipes and influence, as Felicity Blunt is British. Tucci's culture is Italian-American, so there is a lot of Italian influence. Both of them are foodies and happy chefs. But, every once in a while, a recipe will be "seasoned" with shortcuts that come from the 70s American world (for instance, jazzing up canned baked beans rather than cooking from scratch) or shopping tips for the American cook.

This book offers a good mix.

69ArlieS
helmikuu 13, 10:03 pm

>13 klobrien2: A belated happy new thread, Karen.

I very much appreciate John McWhorter

70klobrien2
helmikuu 14, 9:42 am

>69 ArlieS: Hello there! McWhorter is one of my favorite non-fiction authors. Thanks for stopping by, and I’ll soon make my way to your thread.

71klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 14, 11:45 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things. Make grocery list.

Reading: Finished The Tucci Table. Read some Open Throat, Down the Hatch, Artificial: A Love Story.

Magazines: nope

Great Course Ancient Writing and the History of the Alphabet by John McWhorter: Finished! 13, The Yesteryears of Y, 14. Brisk Sojourns Through B, L, N, and S, 15. Meditations on M, D, K, and T, 16. How Did Punctuation Develop?

Grief reading.

Watching. Greatest Night in Pop documentary on Netflix. How “We Are the World” was made, 38 years ago. Really enjoyed this—lots of footage of the popular artists of the time.

72klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 14, 11:46 am

Wordle 970 4/6

⬜⬜🟦🟦⬜
⬜🟦🟦⬜⬜
🟧🟦⬜🟦🟦
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: talon (n.)
c. 1400, talounz (plural) "claws of a bird or beast," especially of a bird of prey, probably originally from Old French talon "heel or hinder part of the foot of a beast, or of a man, or of a shoe; foot-step" (12c.), from Medieval Latin talonem "heel," from Latin talus "ankle" (see talus (n.1)).
"The extension to birds of prey, and subsequent stages, are peculiar to English" OED, 1989. Sometimes in Middle English also also talaund, talaunt; for the unetymological -t, compare pheasant.

73johnsimpson
helmikuu 14, 4:38 pm

Hi Karen my dear, a belated Happy New Thread my dear friend.

74klobrien2
helmikuu 14, 5:22 pm

>73 johnsimpson: Thank you John! It’s great to have you stop by!

75klobrien2
helmikuu 15, 10:20 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things (beneficiary list, Medicare query, monthly “allowance”).

Reading: Finished Down the Hatch.

Magazines: nope, and new issues are showing up like crazy.

Great Course Might start one of my new courses, Middle Ages Around the World or Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art.

Grief reading.

Watching. Ash Wednesday service at my church was live-streamed. Beautiful service. Later on, Jerry and I watched Monarch: Legacy of Monsters episode 3. Liking the show better all the time—it was so confusing at episode 1, now making more sense. And the monsters are fantastic!

76klobrien2
helmikuu 15, 10:26 am

Wordle 971 5/6 A little guessy-ness today, for me. Stupid word and lame etymology. Pfui. irate, gloat, abbot, afoot, ascot

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Etymonline.com: Ascot
village near Windsor, Berkshire, literally "eastern cottage." The site of fashionable horse race meetings, hence its use attributively for clothes suitable for the event; especially a type of tie (1889).

77klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 15, 6:10 pm



53.
Down the Hatch (Agatha Raisin #32) by M. C. Beaton



Nicely written and well-paced.

78klobrien2
helmikuu 16, 10:34 am

Started decluttering/organizing the “sewing room” yesterday—going great.

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things (beneficiary list, Medicare query, monthly “allowance”).

Reading: Finished Open Throat. Read picture books: Gennedy Spirin’s Little Red Riding Hood, I Wonder If I’ll See a Whale.

Magazines: NYT Book Review (2/4), Minnesota History (2023/24-Winter), Threads (2023-Winter).

Great Course Might start one of my new courses, Middle Ages Around the World or Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art.

Grief reading.

Watching. Monarch, episode 4. Red Green special, “We’re All In This Together.” It was great to see the cast of the show as themselves, not their characters. Abbot Elementary, episode 3.3, Resident Alien episode 3.3!

79klobrien2
helmikuu 16, 10:42 am

Wordle 972 6/6 In by the skin of my teeth! Found it really tough to get, playing by “hard mode” rules. I would have been quite po’ed to have bombed, since I’m nearing my maximum streak number (today was 94, my current max is 95).

irate, stank, staff, stall, stamp, stash

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Etymonline.com: stash (v.)
"to conceal, hide," 1797, criminals' slang, a word of unknown origin, perhaps suggested by stow and cache. Related: Stashed; stashing.
also from 1797
stash (n.)
"hoard, cache, a collection of things stashed away," 1914, criminal slang, from stash (v.). The specific sense of "personal supply of narcotics" is by 1942.

80klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 16, 11:59 am



54.
Open Throat: A Novel by Henry Hoke



Tense, involving story narrated by a puma living in the shreds of wildness remaining after the onslaught of civilization, near "ellay." I'm still processing this one. I felt such a connection with the wildcat.

The prose read almost like poetry (in fact, the line were arranged in a very "poem-like" manner. This would be a great reread.

81klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 16, 12:07 pm

Now for this week's "Picture Book Read"! Both of these books came to my attention by whisper1, and I am so grateful!



55.
I Wonder If I'll See a Whale by Francis Ward Weller, ill. Ted Lewin



Lovely story of a "whale watch" and the illustrations are magnificent. The representations of sunlight and water, whales, dolphins, and people are gorgeous.



56.
Little Red Riding Hood by Gennedy Spirin



I've loved all of the Spirin books that I've read, so this one is no exception. The illustrations invite long perusal!

82BLBera
helmikuu 16, 12:09 pm

>60 klobrien2: This cookbook sounds fabulous. I will look for it. I keep forgetting that my library has a cookbook selection. Thanks for the reminder.

>64 klobrien2: I think I enjoyed these stories more than you did. I did appreciate the humor in the one about the author and her retreat.

83klobrien2
helmikuu 16, 4:24 pm

>82 BLBera: I really enjoyed reading So Late in the Day, but I really wasn't sure what to expect when I did so. I am certain that I need to reread this little book.

The story you mentioned--was the guy who invades her space, was he the guy who had provided the house as a writer's retreat? Is he dead? Is the woman author dead? If not, then what is the meaning of "A Long and Painful Death"? As you can tell, I'm still mystified by the story.

The Jacques Pepin cookbook is lovely, with lot of good tips and recipes. I've really loved all of the Pepin cookbooks I've read. And he's written quite a few! And nothing mysterious!

Thanks for stopping by!

84klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 16, 5:56 pm

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (02/16/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing -- p. 15 of 90
The Diaries of Adam and Eve and Other Stories by Mark Twain -- p. 16 of 94
Tom Lake by Ann Patchett
Lady Caroline Lamb: A Free Spirit by Antonia Fraser
Orbital: A Novel by Samantha Harvey -- p. 22 of 207
Artificial: A Love Story by Amy Kurzweil -- p. 68 0f 355
Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club by J. Ryan Stradal -- p. 42 of 355
The Puzzle Master by Danielle Trussoni -- p. 21 of 343
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 8 of 193
No Cure for Being Human by Kate Bowler -- p. 3 of 202
Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Adventures of Isabel (Epitome Apartments #1) by Candas Jane Dorsey
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld -- p. 20 of 300
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In February 24, we are reading Susan Sontag. I plan to read On Photography.

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Courses are:
The Middle Ages Around the World, 1 of 24 lectures read/watched
Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art, 0 of 24 lectures read/watched

85klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 16, 6:45 pm

I’m contemplating doing a “Norman Jewison Film Fest,” in the manner of last year’s “John Huston Film Fest.”

Jewison, who recently passed away, was prolific, and directed a lot of my favorite movies. Here’s a list of his oeuvre (how do you like that cinema-speak?!) The films I’ve seen are in bold.

The Fabulous Fifties (1960) 7.5 on IMDB (unavailable?)
40 Pounds of Trouble (1962) (6.3)
The Thrill of It All (1963) (6.9)
Send Me No Flowers (1964) (6.9)
The Art of Love (1965) (6.1)
The Cincinnati Kid (1965) (7.2)
The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming! (1966) (7.0)
In the Heat of the Night (1967) (7.9)
The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) (6.9)
Gaily, Gaily (1969) (5.3–might skip this one)
Fiddler on the Roof (1971) (8.0)
Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) (7.3)

Rollerball (1975) (6.5)
F.I.S.T. (1978) (6.1)
And Justice For All (1979) (7.4)
Best Friends (1982) (5.5–skip?)
A Soldier’s Story (1984) (7.2)
Agnes of God (1985) (6.6)
Moonstruck (1987) (7.2)

In Country (1989) (5.9)
Other People’s Money (1991) (6.2)
Only You (1994) (6.5)
Bogus (1996) (5.3–skip?)
The Hurricane (1999) (7.6)
The Statement (2003) (6.2)

86jessibud2
helmikuu 16, 7:02 pm

Ooo, he was so good! I've seen many more of his films than I thought I had, according to your list. Seven but not the same 7 as you.

87alcottacre
helmikuu 16, 7:09 pm

Checking in on the "new" thread, Karen. Have a wonderful weekend!

88klobrien2
helmikuu 16, 7:50 pm

>86 jessibud2: Hello, there. I was surprised when I saw all of the films! Some of my favorites…I loved 40 Pounds of Trouble when I was a kid, and I’m looking forward to seeing it again.

Thanks for stopping by to chat!

89klobrien2
helmikuu 16, 7:52 pm

>87 alcottacre: Wonderful weekend wishes to you, too! Are you doing the read-a-thon? If so, I’ll “see” you there! Thanks for stoppin* by!

90klobrien2
helmikuu 17, 10:45 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. A few financial things (beneficiary list, Medicare query, monthly “allowance”). LibraryThing readathon!

Reading: Orbital, The Puzzle Master, Leave Me Alone, I’m Reading, Ironheart Vol. 2

Magazines: The Week (2/9), Bon Appetit (2024 03)

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World: 1. Medieval Beginnings: The Fall of Empires. I really like the instructor’s style and presentation. This should be a fun course.
Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art:

Grief reading.

Watching. Network TV coming back into full swing! Watched: Ghosts (US), Night Court. The Connors, Not Dead Yet.

91klobrien2
helmikuu 17, 10:49 am

Wordle 973 3/6 irate, scald, psalm

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Etymonline.com: Leave it to the English to do things differently! psalm (n.)
"sacred poem or song," especially one expressing praise and thanksgiving, Old English psealm (West Saxon sealm; Anglian salm), partly from Old French psaume, saume, and partly from Church Latin psalmus, from Greek psalmos "song sung to a harp," originally "performance on stringed instrument; a plucking of the harp" (compare psaltes "harper"), from psallein "play on a stringed instrument, pull, twitch" (see feel (v.)).
Used in Septuagint for Hebrew mizmor "song," especially the sort sung by David to the harp and collected in the Old Testament Book of Psalms. Related: Psalmodize. After some hesitation, the pedantic ps- spelling prevailed in English, as it has in many neighboring languages (German, French, etc.), but English is almost alone in not pronouncing the p-.

92BLBera
helmikuu 17, 10:52 am

>83 klobrien2: I thought it was more a comment on where ideas come from. She was annoyed with the guy and killed him in her writing. Maybe I should go back and read it. Anyway, in my take, it was funny.

93klobrien2
helmikuu 17, 11:29 am

>92 BLBera: Well, I must go get that book again. I agree with you, I felt the humor in the story. Keegan has such layers in her writing, don’t you think? Her books and stories are so short, so simple, but maybe they really aren’t that simple.

Thanks for the discussion—it’s got me intrigued!

94Owltherian
helmikuu 17, 11:30 am

Hello Karen! How are you?

95klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 17, 11:40 am

I am so happy to be posting this, because I haven’t been able to solve Connections for days! I breathe a sigh of relief!

Connections
Puzzle #251
🟨🟨🟨🟨 bit of hair (curl, lock, ringlet, tress)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 noun suffixes (dom, ion, ness, ship)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 ____ circus (family, flea, flying, media)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 media attention (coverage, exposure, press, publicity)

96jessibud2
helmikuu 17, 11:41 am

>95 klobrien2: - Karen, I can't see what your words are under your spoilers in Connections. I only got 2 before bailing. And good work on Wordle. It took me all 6!

97klobrien2
helmikuu 17, 11:41 am

>94 Owltherian: Doing well! Have a great weekend!

98klobrien2
helmikuu 17, 11:46 am

>96 jessibud2: Now the words are there. I had wiped out my almost-finished post (pfui!) so I determined to save periodically so I wouldn’t have to rebuild it yet again.

Glad you got Wordle! Sorry about Connections. There are so many factors that influence the solving of these puzzles—like, how rested you are, if you have the sniffles, etc.

Great to see you here! Happy weekend to you!

99jessibud2
helmikuu 17, 1:57 pm

Thanks. I got the yellow and the green categories but bombed out for the rest.

100Owltherian
helmikuu 17, 4:04 pm

>97 klobrien2: Same with you!

101BLBera
helmikuu 17, 4:44 pm

Yes, Keegan is great. I might take another look at that story as well.

102PaulCranswick
helmikuu 18, 8:29 am

56 books read already is mightily impressive, Karen!

103klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 18, 8:43 am

>102 PaulCranswick: I’m really enjoying my reading, and what I’m reading is by no means difficult or “you must read this book.” Just reading for fun.

Thanks for stopping by to chat! I’ll be by your thread soon. Have a great Sunday!

104klobrien2
helmikuu 18, 8:43 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Finish making a little turkey soup. LibraryThing readathon!

Reading: Ironheart Vol. 2—finished, Ironheart: Riri Williams—finished, Artificial: A Love Story

Magazines:

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:
Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art:

Grief reading.

Watching. Feud episode 2.4.

105klobrien2
helmikuu 18, 8:48 am

Wordle 974 4/6 irate, spire, rifle, ridge

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Etymonline.com: ridge (n.)
Middle English rigge, from Old English hrycg "back of a man or beast," probably reinforced by Old Norse hryggr "back, ridge," from Proto-Germanic *hruggin (source also of Old Frisian hregg, Old Saxon hruggi, Dutch rug, Old High German hrukki, German Rücken "the back"). OED says "of uncertain relationship;" Pokorny, Boutkan, and Watkins have it from PIE *kreuk-, extended form of root *sker- (2) "to turn, bend."
The original "back" sense, predominant in Middle English, seems to have become archaic 17c. Also in Old English, "the top or crest of anything," especially when long and narrow, based on resemblance to the projecting part of the back of a quadruped, the "ridge" of the backbone. Probably also in late Old English "a long elevation of land, a long, narrow range of hills," implied in place-names. From late 14c. of the highest part of the roof of a building, also the strip of ground thrown up between two plowed furrows. The spelling with -dg- is from late 15c.
Ridge-runner, somewhat derisive term for "Southern Appalachian person, hillbilly," especially an upland white farmer of the Ozarks region, is recorded by 1917 (it later came into use in other regions). Also "person who wanders from place to place," often with a suggestion of illicit intent (1930).

106richardderus
helmikuu 18, 9:03 am

>105 klobrien2: Morning, Karen O. I had never heard the 1930 sense of the word before now...interesting. About Bogus from >85 klobrien2: above, I advise skipping it entirely. If you get the completist urge, leaving it for last is a bad bet because it will not leave the best memory of his work.

Have a lovely day today. *smooch*

107klobrien2
helmikuu 18, 9:07 am

>106 richardderus: Thanks for the tip on “Bogus”—now even more reason to skip it.

Happy Sunday!

108klobrien2
helmikuu 18, 11:34 am

Connections
Puzzle #252
🟨🟨🟨🟨 eat a little (graze, nibble, peck, snack)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 pursue (hunt, stalk, track, trail)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 ingredients in minestrone (beans, pasta, stock, vegetables)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 ____ cast (broad, fore, pod, type)

109klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 18, 2:18 pm



57.
Ironheart, Vol. 2: Ten Rings by Eve L. Ewing



I really like this new superhero! The books are great--well-written, with very smart and funny dialogue and plot points. Nicely drawn. As one of the book blurbs said, Ironheart is today's superhero.



58.
Ironheart: Riri Williams by Brian Michael Bendis



Turns out that I should have read this book first, but no harm done. Lots of fun, with the artificially-preserved essence of Iron Man hanging around Ironheart.

110klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 18, 7:26 pm



59.
Artificial: A Love Story by Amy Kurzweil



A really impressive (and large) graphic book that tries to do a whole lot: talk about artificial intelligence, immortality, family, love, history, memory...a lot of fascinating insights, but the book is sometimes hard to follow. The author does a bit of jumping around, and it was hard to keep up at times.

It was still a very interesting read.

111vancouverdeb
helmikuu 18, 8:01 pm

Little turkey soup sounds good! Happy week ahead, Karen.

112klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 9:43 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. LibraryThing readathon continues!

Reading: Artificial: A Love Story—finished, Orbital, Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club

Magazines:

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:
Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art:

Grief reading.

Watching. More network shows started up: So Help Me Todd 2.1, Life and Beth 2.1-2, Bob Loves Abishola 5.1.

113Owltherian
helmikuu 19, 9:44 am

Hello Karen! How art thou today?

114klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 9:56 am

>111 vancouverdeb: “Little” turkey soup because I only had the bones from a half turkey breast. It was fun to think in such a smaller frame. Kind of like playing with an Easy Bake Oven when I was a kid.

>113 Owltherian: Hi, Lily…doing fine, and hoping you are, too!

115Owltherian
helmikuu 19, 9:57 am

>114 klobrien2: I am doing well, being blinded by the sun.

116klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 10:02 am

Guessy-guessy (pfui). The solution was actually my fourth guess, but I switched to my actual guess because I thought it was such a cool word. Oh, well.

Wordle 975 5/6 irate, bride, prime, prize, price

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Etymonline.com: price (n.)
c. 1200, pris, "non-monetary value, worth; praise," later "recompense, prize, reward," also "sum or amount of money which a seller asks or obtains for goods in market" (mid-13c.), from Old French pris "price, value, wages, reward," also "honor, fame, praise, prize" (Modern French prix), from Late Latin precium, from Latin pretium "reward, prize, value, worth" (from PIE *pret-yo-, suffixed form of *pret-, extended form of root *per- (5) "to traffic in, to sell").
Praise, price, and prize began to diverge in Old French, with praise emerging in Middle English by early 14c. and prize, with the -z- spelling, evident by late 1500s. Having shed the extra Old French and Middle English senses, price again has the ancient sense of the Latin original. To set (or put) a price on someone, "offer a reward for capture" is from 1766.
also from c. 1200
price (v.)
"to set the price of," late 15c. (from late 14c. in the sense that has gone with praise (v.)), from price (n.) or a variant of prize (v.) or from Old French prisier, a variant of preisier "to value, estimate; to praise." See price (n.). Related: Priced; pricing.

117klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 10:07 am

Today’s poem-a-day:

Seven Steps to Heaven Haiku

Tony Medina

If every bomb
Appeared in the sky a dove
Shrapnel into rain

If vengeance vanquished
From the cursed lips of weak men
An idea never taking root

If every tank vanished
If by chance a miracle
Peace reclaims the land

If laughter broke out
Like wars fought with satire’s
Pugilist punning

What room would there be
For anger what bitter root
Not allowed to stretch

Its tentacles
Through the hearts of men hardened
By indifference

What will we bequeath
Our children if not a world
Evermore human

118klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 10:31 am

Connections
Puzzle #253 (I fell for their very clever setup with my first guess!)

🟨🟨🟩🟦

🟩🟩🟩🟩 mess up (blow, bumble, fluff, spoil)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 used in building a fire (kindling, log, match, tinder)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 workshop tools (drull, grinder, router, saw)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 parts of a door (frame, handle, hinge, lock)

119richardderus
helmikuu 19, 11:50 am

Morning, Karen O.! I thought this might amuse you.

Of course, if it does not, tell me and it will vanish. Monday *smooch*

120klobrien2
helmikuu 19, 11:50 am

>119 richardderus: I love it! Thanks!

121jessibud2
helmikuu 19, 12:46 pm

>119 richardderus: - Haha! Richard, I know I am aging myself, but is that Jackie Gleason??!

122richardderus
helmikuu 19, 1:14 pm

>120 klobrien2: *whew*

>121 jessibud2: It is the man himself from his Miami Beach days!

123klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 20, 9:48 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises.

Reading: Orbital, Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club

Magazines:

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World: 2. Constantinople, Aksum, and Tang China, 3. The Rise of Islam and Europe’s Knights, 4. Creating an Islamic Culture
Post-Impressionism: The Beginnings of Modern Art:

Grief reading.

Watching. Young Sheldon 7.1, Bob Hearts Abishola 5.2, Inspector Morse 8.2 (Phyllis Logan and Benjamin Whitrow (Mr. Bennet in 1995 BBC “Pride and Prejudice”)) guest-starred.

124alcottacre
helmikuu 20, 9:56 am

Checking in on you, Karen! Have a terrific Tuesday!

125klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 20, 10:27 am

Well, that “max streak” didn’t last long! I was really happy with my third guess, but playing by “hard mode” really limits one when one gets into this kind of guessing game. Oh, well, the pressure is off now.

Wordle 976 X/6 irate, splat, hatch, catch, watch, batch, (match)

⬜⬜🟦🟦⬜
⬜⬜⬜🟦🟦
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: Really long etymology today—sorry! match (n.1)
"stick for striking fire." Late 14c., macche, "wick of a candle or lamp," a sense now obsolete, from Old French meiche "wick of a candle," from Vulgar Latin *micca/*miccia (source also of Catalan metxa, Spanish mecha, Italian miccia), which is of uncertain origin, probably ultimately from Latin myxa, from Greek myxa "lamp wick," originally "mucus," based on notion of wick dangling from the spout of a lamp like snot from a nostril, from PIE root *meug- "slimy, slippery" (see mucus). English snot also had a secondary sense from late 14c. of "snuff of a candle, burnt part of a wick," surviving at least to late 19c. in northern dialects.
The modern spelling is from mid-15c. The meaning "piece of cord or tow soaked in sulfur, used for lighting fires, lamps, candles, etc." is from 1530. It was used by 1830 for the modern type of sulfur-tipped wooden friction match, which were perfected about that time, and competed with lucifer for much of 19c. as the name for this invention. An earlier version consisted of a thin strip of wood tipped with combustible matter that required contact with phosphorous carried separately in a box or vial.
In the manufacture of matches much trouble has been occasioned by the use of phosphorous .... In some of the small and poorly-managed factories the men and children are never free from the fumes; their clothes and breath are luminous in the dark, and in the daytime white fumes may be seen escaping from them whenever they are seated by the fire. ... The danger arising from the use of matches was magnified, because they could sometimes be seen in the dark, were liable to ignite on a warm shelf, and were poisonous to such an extent that children had been killed by using them as playthings. John A. Garver, "Matches," in The Popular Science Monthly, August 1877
match (n.2)
"one of a pair, an equal." Middle English macche, from Old English mæcca "companion, mate, one of a pair, wife, husband, one suited to another, an equal," from gemæcca, from Proto-Germanic *gamakon "fitting well together" (source also of Old Saxon gimaco "fellow, equal," Old High German gimah "comfort, ease," Middle High German gemach "comfortable, quiet," German gemach "easy, leisurely"), from PIE root *mag- "to knead, fashion, fit."
Meaning "person or thing that exactly corresponds to another" is from c. 1400. Middle English sense of "matching adversary, person able to contend with another" (c. 1300) led to sporting meaning "contest," which is attested from 1540s. Meaning "a matrimonial compact" is from 1570s.
match (v.)
mid-14c., macchen, "be able to compete with, be an adequate opponent for;" late 14c., "to join one to another" (originally especially in marriage), from match (n.2). Meaning "to place (one) in conflict with (another)" is from c. 1400. That of "to pair with a view to fitness, find or provide something to agree or harmonize with" is from 1520s; that of "to be equal to" is from 1590s. Related: Matched; matching.

126klobrien2
helmikuu 20, 10:23 am

>124 alcottacre: Waving excitedly!

127klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 21, 9:45 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises.

Books I read yesterday: Orbital—should finish it today.

Magazines: New Yorker (02/12-19), (02/26)

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading.

Watching. “Good Burger,” because of Kenan Thompson. Definitely a kid’s movie (Nickelodeon), but after a slow start, I liked it better. No wonder kids love it—lots of grossness and good prevailing over evil. Also watched the first new “The Rookie” and two more “Life and Beth.”

Listening: “Stories from a Rock N Roll Heart,” Lucinda Williams. Really good rock and roll, with country and blues flavoring.

128klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 21, 9:56 am

“phew!”, definitely. Started a new max streak.

Wordle 977 6/6 irate, spiny, which, idiom, guild, build

🟦⬜⬜⬜⬜
⬜⬜🟧⬜⬜
⬜⬜🟧⬜⬜
⬜🟦🟧⬜⬜
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: build (v.)
Middle English bilden, from late Old English byldan "construct a house," verb form of bold "house," from Proto-Germanic *buthla- (source also of Old Saxon bodl, Old Frisian bodel "building, house"), from PIE *bhu- "to dwell," from root*bheue- "to be, exist, grow."
Rare in Old English; in Middle English it won out over the more common Old English timbran (see timber). The modern spelling is unexplained. Figurative use is from mid-15c. Of physical things other than buildings from late 16c. Related: Builded (archaic); built; building.
In the United States, this verb is used with much more latitude than in England. There, as Fennimore Cooper puts it, everything is BUILT. The priest BUILDS up a flock; the speculator a fortune; the lawyer a reputation; the landlord a town; and the tailor, as in England, BUILDS up a suit of clothes. A fire is BUILT instead of made, and the expression is even extended to individuals, to be BUILT being used with the meaning of formed. Farmer, "Slang and Its Analogues," 1890
build (n.)
"style of construction," 1660s, from build (v.). Earlier in this sense was built (1610s). The meaning "physical construction and fitness of a person" is attested by 1981. An earliest sense, now obsolete, was "a building" (early 14c.).

129klobrien2
helmikuu 21, 10:45 am

I got the first two connections, then had to go away for a while to come up with the last two. I’m very happy with the solve.

Connections
Puzzle #255
🟩🟩🟩🟩 Tony winners for best musical (Annie, Cabaret, Cats, Company)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 pesters (badgers, bugs, hounds, nags)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 they have keys (computer, piano, super, tests)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 school of ____ (fish, hard knocks, rock, thought)

130ReneeMarie
helmikuu 21, 10:53 am

>127 klobrien2: I LOVE Lucinda Williams' music. If you haven't heard them, I would have to say Ramblin' and Sweet Old World are my favorites. I bought the one you're listening to, but haven't heard it yet.

131klobrien2
helmikuu 21, 10:57 am

>130 ReneeMarie: Thanks for the Lucinda Williams recommendations. I think “Car Wheels on a Gravel Road” is the only other LW album I’ve listened to. Time to change that situation!

132klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 11:12 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises.

Books I read yesterday: Orbital—should finish it today (only twenty pages left). Today I want to get to Tom Lake and “Saturday Night.”

Magazines: The Week (2/16) and Elle (February).

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading.

Watching. I watched NO TV today, and didn’t miss it! I did “attend” my church’s Lenten online service, so that’s my visual involvement today, I guess.

133alcottacre
helmikuu 22, 11:21 am

>132 klobrien2: Tom Lake is so very good IMHO. I hope you enjoy it!

134klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 11:23 am

>133 alcottacre: I dipped into it once before but ran out of time at the library. Now I have it for one more week, and it has priority with me. Can’t wait!

Thanks for visiting!

135klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 11:25 am

Wordle 978 3/6 irate, beach, heavy

⬜⬜🟧⬜🟦
⬜🟧🟧⬜🟦
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonlune.com: heavy (adj.)
Old English hefig "heavy, having much weight; important, grave; oppressive; slow, dull," from Proto-Germanic *hafiga "containing something; having weight" (source also of Old Saxon, Old High German hebig, Old Norse hofugr, Middle Dutch hevich, Dutch hevig), from PIE root *kap- "to grasp."
The jazz slang sense of "profound, serious" is from 1937 but would have been comprehensible to an Anglo-Saxon. Heavy industry is recorded from 1932. Heavy metal is attested by 1839 in chemistry; in nautical jargon from at least 1744 in the sense of "large-caliber guns on a ship."
While we undervalue the nicely-balanced weight of broadsides which have lately been brought forward with all the grave precision of Cocker, we are well aware of the decided advantages of heavy metal. United Services Journal, London, 1830
As a type of rock music, from 1972.
Most other Germanic languages use as their primary word for this their equivalent of Middle English swere, Old English swær, which is obsolete (see sweer).
heavy (n.)
mid-13c., "something heavy; heaviness," from heavy (adj.). Theatrical sense of "villain" is 1880, short for heavy villain (1843), heavy leading man (1849) or similar phrases.
A "heavy business man," he who performs such parts as Ferardo in the Wife, the Ghost in Hamlet, and Malec, Edmund, Banquo, Buckingham and the principal villains of the drama, will command at present from $15 to $20 per week. "The Amateur, or Guide to the Stage," Philadelphia, 1851

136klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 11:52 am

Connections
Puzzle #256
🟦🟦🟦🟦 origin (cradle, font, root, source)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 dog sounds (bark, growl, howl, whine)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 department (arm, branch, chapter, wing)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 colors with their first letters changed (clue, frown, mellow, preen)

137Whisper1
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 22, 12:21 pm

>81 klobrien2: Thanks so very much for your affirmation of Illustrated books! They bring such joy, and insight!!! I finished Geraffes Can't Dance this morning. I laughed right out loud!
Gennady Spirin is at the top of the list of my favorite illustrators. His work is incredible! I've collected most of his books.

138Whisper1
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 22, 12:31 pm

I've added So Late in the Day: Stories of Women and Men by Claire Keegan and Knight Owl by Christopher Denise
Thanks for recommending these gems.

139klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 12:47 pm

>137 Whisper1: >138 Whisper1: Hello, Linda! I would, in turn, thank you once again for helping me on my way with the illustrated books. They are such a treat to the eyes and spirit.

I've got So Late in the Day requested again--I want to reread these little gems. I hope you like the read of that book; I know you will like Knight Owl!

So nice to see you here on my thread! Have a great day!

140klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 22, 1:00 pm



60.
Orbital: A Novel by Samantha Harvey



What a great book! The prose is so dense, so rich in words and emotions. Clever frame: the chapters take us through the "day" of six astronauts/cosmonauts (sixteen orbits) on a space station orbiting Earth. We get to know these passengers and their missions, and a lot about living in space. The planet Earth is the focus of this book.

From the inside back cover: "Profound, contemplative, and gorgeous, Orbital is an eloquent meditation on space and a moving elegy to our humanity, environment, and planet."

So many beautiful passages in this book! Here are a few that I especially liked:

Before long, for all of them, a desire takes hold. It's the desire--no, the need (fuelled by fervour}--to protect this huge yet tiny earth. This thing of such miraculous and bizarre loveliness."

Continents and countries come one after the other and the earth feels--not small, but almost endlessly connected, an epic poem of flowing verses.


I'll be thinking about this book for a while; I'm sure a reread is in my future.

141ocgreg34
helmikuu 22, 3:59 pm

>1 klobrien2: Happy new thread! As always, I'm impressed with how many books you've already read...

142klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 4:30 pm

>141 ocgreg34: Hi, Greg! Nice to see you here!

143klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 7:53 pm

From karenmarie, here is a recipe that I’d like to try:

My Mother’s Cheese Cake
**or**
Knudsen Sour Cream Container Cheesecake Recipe, 1960s

13 graham crackers, approx 1 ¾ cup crumbs*
¼ lb butter (1 stick), melted**
16 ounces cream cheese, softened
2/3 cup sugar
1 egg

8 ounces sour cream
1 t vanilla
2 t sugar

Preheat oven to 325F. Grind graham crackers to fine crumbs.*** Add melted butter, press into pie pan. Beat cream cheese and sugar by hand until smooth, add egg and beat until smooth. Put in pie crust, bake 18-20 minutes. While pie is cooling (20 minutes), combine sour cream, sugar, and vanilla. Add topping to cheese cake, bake 10 minutes more. Chill thoroughly.

*It used to be that one sleeve of graham crackers worked, but as they keep giving you less for the same $ or more, I figured out 13 one year when the graham cracker crumbs + stick of melted butter were too greasy and didn't fill the pan properly. YMMV on the # of crackers to use. It's currently 9 per sleeve, don't know how many it used to be.

**for low-sodium users, 1 stick unsalted butter + ¼ t salt works well. I melt the butter (plus salt if unsalted butter) in a 4-cup Pyrex measure in the microwave, then dump in the graham crackers crumbs and stir with a fork. Saves dishes.

***I put the graham crackers into a gallon-sized baggie, then use my marble rolling pin to grind them. They do not have to be pulverized. A few larger crumbs are actually desirable, IMO.

I use a 9” Pyrex pie pan.

144Whisper1
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 22, 8:01 pm

I've added Orbital by Samatha Harvey to my ever expanding to be read pile. Your feelings about this book are strong, and I feel that I really need to read this one!

Thanks.

145klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 22, 8:07 pm

>144 Whisper1: I was a little amazed at how much Orbital moved me. It is so uplifting about people, about our world, about humankind’s desire to go to the stars. I hope you het a chance to read it!

Always so good to see you here, dear friend…

146BLBera
helmikuu 22, 8:48 pm

>140 klobrien2: I have this one waiting for me at the library, Karen. I skimmed over your comments because I hope to read it soon -- I just saw the five stars and now can't wait to get to it.

147klobrien2
helmikuu 22, 11:59 pm

>146 BLBera: I hope you love Orbital as much as I did. I don’t give out 5 stars very often. I’ll be waiting to see how you feel about the book.

148Owltherian
helmikuu 23, 12:00 am

Hello Karen! How are you?

149klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 23, 3:16 pm

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Ran errands—I need to get out more!

Books I read yesterday: Orbital—finished. Tom Lake—started.

Magazines: NYT Magazine (2/4), NYT Book Review (2/11)

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading.

Watching. Monarch: Legacy of Monsters ep. 5, Resident Alien 3.2, Abbot Elementary 3.4, The Connors 6.3.

150klobrien2
helmikuu 23, 10:23 am

Got to the point where I thought there had to be letters repeating…

Wordle 979 5/6 irate, stark, chart, quart, apart

⬜🟦🟧🟦⬜
⬜🟦🟧🟧⬜
⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: apart (adv.)
"to or at the side; by itself, away from others," late 14c., from Old French a part (Modern French à part) "to the side," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + partem, accusative of pars "a part, piece, a faction, a part of the body" (from PIE root *pere- (2) "to grant, allot"). The first element is probably felt in English as a- as in abroad, ahead (see a- (1)). As an adjective from 1786.

151klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 23, 11:01 am

Connections
Puzzle #257
🟨🟨🟨🟨 procession (caravan, fleet, parade, train)
🟩🟩🟪🟩
🟩🟩🟪🟩
🟩🟩🟩🟩 shades of green (forest, lime, mint, olive)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 what “blue” might mean (Democratic, erotic, noble, sad)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 things with spines (book, cactus, hedgehog, skeleton)

152richardderus
helmikuu 23, 11:23 am

>143 klobrien2: I absolutely ADORE this cheesecake. It was my birthday cake for my entire teens.

Lovely-weekend whammys coming your way, dear lady!

153Kristelh
helmikuu 23, 3:06 pm

>149 klobrien2:. I think the touchstone might be wrong here. It took me to a comic series by a different author. The cheesecake sounds good. Have a good weekend Karen.

154klobrien2
helmikuu 23, 3:17 pm

>153 Kristelh: Thanks for the heads-up on the touchstone! I fixed it. I'm looking forward to trying karenmarie's cheesecake soon! Good weekend to you, too!

155klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 24, 1:21 pm



61.
My Friend Earth by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Francesca Sanna



Another wonderful Patricia MacLachlan book, recommended by Linda (whisper1). This book is almost three-dimensional, in its layered pages, textured cover, and shiny accents throughout. It's like a palimpsest (isn't that great word?) of a book. And it has a great story, emphasizing the cyclical nature of Earth and...nature.

156klobrien2
helmikuu 23, 6:49 pm

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (02/23/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Tom Lake by Ann Patchett -- p. 4 of 309
Lady Caroline Lamb: A Free Spirit by Antonia Fraser -- p. 0 of 205
Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club by J. Ryan Stradal -- p. 106 of 355
The Puzzle Master by Danielle Trussoni -- p. 27 of 343
Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World by Matt Kracht
Electric Arches by Eve L. Ewing -- p. 15 of 90
The Diaries of Adam and Eve and Other Stories by Mark Twain -- p. 16 of 94
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 8 of 193
No Cure for Being Human by Kate Bowler -- p. 3 of 202
Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld -- p. 20 of 300
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In February, we are reading Susan Sontag. I will sit this one out.

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Course is:
The Middle Ages Around the World, 4 of 24 lectures read/watched.

157klobrien2
helmikuu 24, 10:30 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Weekly admin things. Do a little cooking?

Books I read yesterday: My Friend Earth—finished. the Puzzle Master, The Diaries of Adam and Eve.

Magazines: The Week (2/23), Archeology (2024 01 02)

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading.

Watching: Lots of latest episodes: So Help Me Todd 2.2, Young Sheldon 7.2, Feud 2.5 (great episode: James Baldwin tries to rescue Truman Capote), Ghosts (US) 3.2, Night Court 2.9, Not Dead Yet 2.3.

158klobrien2
helmikuu 24, 10:35 am

Didn’t make Wordle today, but not as irritating because I didn’t have a streak going. So much guessing today.

Wordle 980 X/6 irate, miler, wider, giver, riser, hiker, piper

🟦🟦⬜⬜🟦
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧
⬜🟧⬜🟧🟧

Etymology.com: piper (n.)
"one who plays the pipes," Old English pipere, agent noun from pipe (v.). By late 14c. also "a bag-piper." As a kind of fish, from c. 1600. Figurative expression pay the piper is recorded from 1680s.
Entries linking to piper

pipe (v.)
Old English pipian "to play on a pipe" or similar instrument, from Latin pipare "to peep, chirp," of imitative origin (see pipe (n.1)). Compare Dutch pijpen, German pfeifen.
From 1590s, of birds, "to chirp, warble, whistle, sing." Meaning "convey through pipes" is by 1887. Related: Piped; piping. Piping hot is in Chaucer, a reference to hissing of food in a frying pan.
To pipe up (early 15c.) originally meant "to begin to play" (on a musical instrument); sense of "to speak out" is from 1856. Pipe down "be quiet" is from 1900, probably a reversal of this, but earlier (and concurrently) in nautical jargon it was a bo'sun's whistle signal to dismiss the men from duty (1833); pipe in the nautical sense of "to call by the pipe or whistle" is by 1706.


159klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 24, 11:14 am

Feeling better to have solved Connections perfectly…

Connections
Puzzle #258
🟨🟨🟨🟨 manufacturing locations (factory, mill, plant, shop)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 parts of fruit you might not eat (core, rind, seed, stem)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 weights in boxing (feather, heavy, light, middle)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 win + letter (wind, wine, wing, wink)

160Kristelh
helmikuu 24, 12:31 pm

Karen, I bombed on wordle today, too. I did manage to get Connections but it took me more tries than you.

161Whisper1
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 24, 12:43 pm

>155 klobrien2: I'm glad you liked My Friend Earth. The cut out pages were a unique concept and made the book more likeable. I've never found a book written by Patricia MacLachlan that I didn't like. I recently purchased many of her books via Thriftbooks.com. I'm reading My Father's Words now. Another good book! Sadly, she passed away, which encourages me to read all of her books. I'm sad there won't be more.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/11/books/patricia-maclachlan-dead.html#:~:text=P....

162vancouverdeb
helmikuu 24, 12:52 pm

Well, I managed Wordle in 3 today. Too bad about getting skunked on Wordle today. Better luck tomorrow, Karen.

163klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 24, 1:25 pm

>160 Kristelh: >162 vancouverdeb: Oh, well, still having tons of fun with both Wordle and Connections!

>161 Whisper1: I thank you again for pointing the way to MacLachlan! And Gennady Spirin! One great thing about illustrated books is that they are eminently re-readable!

Thank you all for stopping by to chat!

164atozgrl
helmikuu 24, 7:06 pm

>159 klobrien2: I solved Connections today exactly the same way that you did! Wordle was hard today. I finally gave up and looked at the used words list because I didn't want to get skunked and there were too many options. I try to never use that list, but I gave in today. Even with that, I felt lucky to get it in 6.

165klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 9:08 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Weekly admin things. Do a little cooking?

Books I read yesterday: The Diaries of Adam and Eve

Magazines:

Great Course Middle Ages Around the World: 5. Medieval Spread of Religions, 6. Medieval Building of Empires

Grief reading.

Watching: Guardians of the Galaxy 2!

166klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 9:15 am

Wordle 981 3/6 irate, misty, smith

🟦⬜⬜🟧⬜
🟦🟦🟦🟧⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: smith (n.)
Middle English smith, from Old English smið "blacksmith, armorer, one who works in metal" (jewelers as well as blacksmiths), more broadly, "handicraftsman, practitioner of skilled manual arts" (also including carpenters), from Proto-Germanic *smithaz "skilled worker" (source also of Old Saxon smith, Old Norse smiðr, Danish smed, Old Frisian smith, Old High German smid, German Schmied, Gothic -smiþa, in aiza-smiþa "coppersmith"), from a suffixed form of PIE root *smi- "to cut, work with a sharp instrument" (source also of Greek smilē "knife for cutting and carving, chisel").
Attested as a surname by c. 975. Also used in a Middle English psalter of God, when he created light. Other common surnames meaning "smith" include Ferraro (Italian), Haddad (Arabic), Kovács (Hungarian, a Slavic loan-word), Kowalski (Polish), Herrero (Spanish), Kuznets (Russian), MacGowan (Irish, "son of the blacksmith").
smith (v.)
Middle English smithen, "fashion" metal, with a hammer, from Old English smiðian "to forge, fabricate, design or fashion, as metal," from the source of smith (n.). Compare Dutch smeden, German schmeiden. Related: Smithed; smithing.

167msf59
helmikuu 25, 9:19 am

Happy Sunday, Karen. I LOVE LOVE Lucinda Williams. Car Wheels on a Gravel Road is a fantastic album. She is remarkably consistent, although I haven't listened to anything new (10-15 yrs). I did see her in concert at least once and she was incredible. She is a treasure.

I am so glad that you also loved Orbital. I felt the same way. What a terrific surprise.

168klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 9:44 am

>167 msf59: I am becoming a great fan of Lucinda. I’ve got another of her albums (This Sweet Old World) coming to me this week. The new one is fantastic. She has Bruce Springsteen and Patti Scialfa doing backup vocals on a few songs, and some of the rockier songs feel a little like early Springsteen to me. And that heartbreaking voice!

Since finishing Orbital I keep reading things in the news that prompt me to think of it—like the recent moon landing, or how space travel physically affected someone who had been to space…

So good to see you here, Mark! Have a grwat weekend!

169richardderus
helmikuu 25, 9:51 am

>166 klobrien2: My favorite QI word discovery of all time is from Dr. Johnson's dictionary: "shapesmith", or what we would call today a "personal trainer."

Why we stopped using that wonderful word I will never know.

Happy Sunday, dear lady.

170klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 25, 12:29 pm

>169 richardderus: Oh, I like that—“shapesmith.” It’s a little tricky to say; maybe that’s why it didn’t keep…

Happy Sunday to you, too, my friend. And thanks for stopping by!

171klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 12:33 pm

Connections
Puzzle #259
🟩🟩🟩🟩 flexible (elastic, limber, plastic, supple)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 walk heavily (lumber, plod, stomp, trudge)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 fencing equipment (foil, glove, jacket, mask)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 words beginning with instruments (bassinet, cellophane, harpoon, organism)

172The_Hibernator
helmikuu 25, 3:39 pm

Hi Karen! What do you plan on cooking? I was going for something simple today to save time for cleaning out in prep for some work in our basement. Our house is always such a mess!

173ReneeMarie
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 25, 3:49 pm

>168 klobrien2: Yay! And I can't help myself. I love an eclectic group of music. During the mid-'90s I went through a folk phase thanks mostly to reading Dirty Linen magazine. So I also highly recommend:

* _Love, Kristina_ by Kristina Olsen
* _Honesty Room_ & _This Mortal City_ by Dar Williams
* _Good Thing He Can't Read My Mind_ by Christine Lavin
* _Octoroon_ by Laura Love
* _Not a Pretty Girl_ by Ani Di Franco
* anything by Nanci Griffith

Olsen & Griffith have that country vibe that Lucinda Williams has.

174Owltherian
helmikuu 25, 3:50 pm

Hi Karen! How are ya?

175klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:19 pm

>172 The_Hibernator: Others on the “75ers” thread mentioned Red Beans and Rice and I just so happen to have a box of Zataraine’s in the cupboard. I also have the makings for Calico Beans (basically, a bunch of different canned beans (black, kidney, Great Northern, and baked) with browned ground beef. Mmm!

I settled for cheese and crackers for lunch.

All pretty simple. But I haven’t actually cooked anything yet…😁

176klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:23 pm

>173 ReneeMarie: I’ve heard of Dar Williams, Ani Di Franco, and Nanci Griffith. I’ll try to get hold of these—I’m sure I’d like them. When I was looking for Lucinda Williams albums I found an Emmy Lou Harris tribute album, with all kinds of groups doing her songs! Can’t wait to listen to that one!

Thanks for all of the reccies!

177klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:24 pm

>174 Owltherian: Hi, Lily! I’m doing fine, thanks for asking!

178Owltherian
helmikuu 25, 4:29 pm

>177 klobrien2: You're welcome Karen!

179klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:47 pm



62.
The Diaries of Adam and Eve and Other Stories by Mark Twain



The "diaries" are nothing but fun, and they are the reason I picked up this book. The other stories are fine, but a little convoluted, a little of-another-time-and-place. While still enjoyable, their humor/satire fell a little flat for me. Still, a great little book to read on a Sunday afternoon.

180Owltherian
helmikuu 25, 4:51 pm

I have a question and i have art block. What should i try to draw?

181katiekrug
helmikuu 25, 4:54 pm

Ooh, I LOVE Dar Williams!

182klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:57 pm

I have no idea of what "art block" is, and no opinion of what you should draw.

People on LibraryThing usually discuss the books they are reading, or TV shows/movies they've seen, or music they like.

Have a good rest-of-the-weekend!

183klobrien2
helmikuu 25, 4:58 pm

>181 katiekrug: That settles it -- I must go find some Dar Williams!

184Owltherian
helmikuu 25, 4:59 pm

Art block is where you cant figure out what to draw and or animate and stuff like that

185drneutron
helmikuu 25, 8:18 pm

Mmmm, red beans and rice! One of my faves, and can’t beat Zatarain’s.

186klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 26, 9:05 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Medicare Zoom informational session.

Books I read yesterday: I wanted to finish up some shorter books, so I had a buffet reading strategy: The Diaries of Adam and Eve—finished, Dream Within a Dream—finished, Electric Arches—finished, Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World, Tom Lake, Devil’s Delight

Magazines:

Great Course:

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: Red Green Specials, disc 4 (one disc left in the whole box set)!

187klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 26, 9:25 am

Wordle 982 3/6 irate, teeny, often

⬜⬜⬜🟦🟦
🟦🟦⬜🟦⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: often (adv.)
"repeatedly, again and again, many times, under many circumstances," mid-13c., an extended form of oft, in Middle English typically before vowels and h-, probably by influence of its opposite, seldom (Middle English selden). In common use from 16c., replacing oft. Pronunciation "offen" recorded from 15c. Related: Oftener; oftenest.
also from mid-13c.
Entries linking to often

oft (adv.)
Old English oft "repeatedly, again and again, many times; frequently; under many circumstances," from Proto-Germanic *ufta- "frequently" (source also of Old Frisian ofta, Danish ofte, Old High German ofto, German oft, Old Norse opt, Gothic ufta "often"), a word of unknown origin, perhaps Watkins from a suffixed form of PIE root *upo "under."
Archaic or only poetic except in compounds (such as oft-told) and replaced by its derivative often. It also was an adjective in Middle English, "frequent, repeated." Related: Ofter; oftest.

188klobrien2
helmikuu 26, 9:59 am

Connections
Puzzle #260
🟩🟩🟩🟩 stand up to, as a challenge (brave, confront, face, meet)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 basic tastes (bitter, salty, sour, sweet)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 ilk (kind, sort, type, variety)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 art movements with -ism (expression, manner, romantic, surreal)

189klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 26, 2:29 pm



63.
Electric Arches by Eve L Ewing



The back-of-the-book-blurb explains this collection: ""Electric Arches" is an imaginative exploration of black girlhood and womanhood through poetry, visual art, and narrative prose." The different elements are powerful and compelling, making for a great statement.

I've enjoyed Ewing's writing in a newer graphic "superhero" set, "Iron Heart." it was great to read this book, written before those GNs, to see where Ewing is starting from.

Here's one of my favorite poems from this collection. It is the last element in the book.

Affirmation

to youth living in prison
after Assata Shakur

Speak this to yourself
until you know it is true.

I believe that I woke up today
and my lungs were working,
miraculously,
my voice can sing and murmur and ask,
miraculously.
My hands may shake, but they can hold
me, or another.
My blood still carries the gifts of the air
from my heart to my brain,
miraculously.
Put a finger to my wrist or my temple
and feel it: I am magic. Life
and all its good and bad and ugly things,
scary things which I would like to forget,
beautiful things which I would like to remember
--the whole messy lovely true story of myself
pulses within me.
I believe that the sun shines,
if not here, then somewhere.
Somewhere it rains,
and things will grow green and wonderful.
Sometimes my insides rain from the inside out
and then I know
I am alive
I am alive
I am alive

190klobrien2
helmikuu 26, 2:36 pm



64.
Dream Within a Dream by Patricia MacLachlan



A middle grade "chapter book" from Patricia MacLachlan via whisper1. It's about first love and, indeed, love in all its connections. "Eleven-year-old aspiring writer Louisa considers traveling the world with her globe-trotting parent, but friendship with George helps her to see her grandparents' farm on Deer Island in a new light."

Lovely book, very nice read.

191alcottacre
helmikuu 26, 2:55 pm

>140 klobrien2: I already have that one in the BlackHole or I would be adding it again! I am glad to see that you enjoyed it so much.

192klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 27, 9:35 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises.

Books I read yesterday: Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World, Lady Caroline Lamb: A Free Spirit, Devil’s Delight

Magazines: The Week (3/1), Wired (2024 03 04)

Great Course: Read 7. North America and the Viking Explorers, 8. Medieval Growth and Prosperity. Will watch the lectures today.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: Inspector Morse 8.3. Had Roger Allem (Thursday, from “Endeavour”), Maggie Steed (from “Clatterford”).

193msf59
helmikuu 27, 9:39 am

>173 ReneeMarie: I am a fan of Ani Di Franco too. I love her earlier stuff but I haven't listened to her in more than a decade. She is due a revisit. Thanks.

194klobrien2
helmikuu 27, 11:01 am

Wordle 983 5/6 irate, globe, spume, scene, sense

⬜⬜⬜⬜🟧
⬜⬜⬜⬜🟧
🟧⬜⬜⬜🟧
🟧⬜🟦🟦🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: sense (n.)
late 14c., "meaning, signification, interpretation" (especially of Holy Scripture); c. 1400, "the faculty of perception;" from Old French sens "one of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding" (12c.) and directly from Latin sensus "perception, feeling, undertaking, meaning," from sentire "perceive, feel, know."
This probably is a figurative use of a literal meaning "find one's way," or "go mentally." According to Watkins and others, this is from a PIE root *sent- "to go" (source also of Old High German sinnan "to go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive," German Sinn "sense, mind," Old English sið "way, journey," Old Irish set, Welsh hynt "way").
The application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, any special faculty of sensation connected with a bodily organ) in English is recorded from 1520s. They usually are reckoned as five; sometimes a "muscular sense" and "inner (common) sense" are added (perhaps to make the perfect seven), hence the old phrase the seven senses, sometimes meaning "consciousness in its totality." For the meaning "consciousness, mind generally," see senses.
The meaning "that which is wise, judicious, sensible, or intelligent" is from c. 1600. The meaning "capacity for perception and appreciation" also is from c. 1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s). The meaning "a vague consciousness or feeling" is from 1590s.
also from late 14c.
sense (v.)
1590s, "perceive (an object) by the senses," from sense (n.). The meaning "be conscious inwardly of" (one's state or condition) is from 1680s. The sense of "perceive or understand (a fact or situation) not by direct perception" is from 1872. Related: Sensed; sensing.

195klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 27, 11:29 am

Connections
Puzzle #261
🟦🟦🟦🟦 kinds of crackers (animal, goldfish, oyster, ritz)
🟨🟪🟨🟩
🟩🟩🟩🟩 gymnastics positions (pike, split, straddle, tuck)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 ‘80s fashion trends (headband, mullet, neon, spandex)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 ____ ladder (corporate, rope, salmon, word)

196Whisper1
helmikuu 27, 11:35 am

>190 klobrien2: Thank you for following my thread and reading the same books as I have. I appreciate it. I've recently read three more books by this author. Each one is heart felt. One of the books Before You Came has stellar illustrations.

I hope your day is a good one. The sun is shinging here in Pennsylvania, and I might have enough energy to make a trip to Brnes and Noble to look at their collections. My neighbor is going with me. there is a dollar store in the same area. I'll go with her. I find some good office supplies.

197Whisper1
helmikuu 27, 11:37 am

>117 klobrien2: Thank for posting this lovely poem.

198klobrien2
helmikuu 27, 12:05 pm

>196 Whisper1: >197 Whisper1: I hope your outing brings you some relaxation and some great finds! Fresh air and sunshine might be just the thing to make you feel better!

I’ve got Before You Came requested at my library—I think I requested it immediately after reading about it on your thread!

Thanks for stopping by!

199ReneeMarie
helmikuu 27, 11:25 pm

>193 msf59: :-) Di Franco is on a very short list of people I've seen in concert as an adult. Others are George Michael, New Order, Everly Brothers, Chuck Berry, Huey Lewis & the News, Buckwheat Zydeco, and Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown.

All in all, I'd rather just listen to music than see a concert. Especially if the music's playing in a bar with a dance floor.

200klobrien2
helmikuu 28, 9:56 am

>199 ReneeMarie: Although the bar setting makes for some fun people-watching, the acoustics may not be as good there. Still, you get the heart and soul of the music there.

201figsfromthistle
helmikuu 28, 10:00 am

Just catching up.....happy mid week!

202msf59
helmikuu 28, 10:01 am

Happy Wednesday! Karen. I am currently listening to Car Wheels on a Gravel Road. What an absolutely perfect album. Thanks for putting it back on my radar. Of course, I will be sampling more of her work beyond this LP.

>199 ReneeMarie: Wow! I have seen Buckwheat Zydeco & Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown in concert. In smaller clubs, which I don't mind. I think seeing New Order, would have been awesome.

203klobrien2
helmikuu 28, 10:07 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Grocery list. Errands.

Books I read yesterday: Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World, Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club. I bought Nook versions of Saturday Night and Tom Lake because both books are in high demand at the library, and I need to get the paper books back. Don’t mind owning a copy of either book!

Magazines: Rolling Stone (Feb), Mother Jones (Mar/April)

Great Course: Watched 7. North America and the Viking Explorers, 8. Medieval Growth and Prosperity. Read 9. The Crusades Clash of Cultures, 1097-1291 and 10. Medieval Town and Trade Networks. Will watch these today, and read ahead for 11 and 12.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: Inspector Morse 8.4, Bob (heart) Abishola 5.3, Life and Beth 2.5 and 2.6.

204klobrien2
helmikuu 28, 10:28 am

Wordle 984 3/6 irate, denim, devil

🟦⬜⬜⬜🟦
🟧🟧⬜🟧⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: devil (n.)
Old English deofol "a devil, a subordinate evil spirit afflicting humans;" also, in Christian theology, "the Devil, a powerful spirit of evil otherwise known as Satan," from Late Latin diabolus (also the source of Italian diavolo, French diable, Spanish diablo; German Teufel is Old High German tiufal, from Latin via Gothic diabaulus).
The Late Latin word is from Ecclesiastical Greek diabolos, which in Jewish and Christian use was "the Devil, Satan," and which in general use meant "accuser, slanderer" (thus it was a scriptural loan-translation of Hebrew satan; see Satan). It is an agent noun from Greek diaballein "to slander, attack," literally "to throw across," from dia "across, through" (see dia-) + ballein "to throw" (from PIE root *gwele- "to throw, reach").
Jerome re-introduced Satan in Latin bibles, and English translators have used both words in different measures. In Vulgate, as in Greek, diabolus and dæmon (see demon) were distinct, but they have merged in English and other Germanic languages.
Meaning "false god, heathen god" is from c. 1200. Sense of "diabolical person, person resembling a devil or demon in character" is from late 12c. Playful use for "clever rogue" is from c. 1600. As an expletive and in expletive phrases from c. 1200.
Meaning "sand spout, dust storm" is from 1835 (dust devil is attested by 1867). In U.S. place names, the word often represents a native word such as Algonquian manito, more properly "spirit, god." Phrase a devil way (c. 1300) was originally "Hell-ward, to Hell," but by late 14c. it was a mere expression of irritation. Meaning "errand-boy in a printing office" is from 1680s, perhaps because they were often blackened by the ink (devils then being popularly supposed to be black).
Devil's books "playing cards" is from 1729, but the cited quote says they've been called that "time out of mind" (the four of clubs is the devil's bedposts); devil's coach-horse is from 1840, the large rove-beetle, which is defiant when disturbed. Devil's food cake (1895; three different recipes in the cookbook "compiled by the Ladies' Aid Society of the Friends' Church, Wilmington, Ohio"), rich and chocolate, probably is in deliberate contrast to angel food cake. Conventional phrase talk (or speak) of the Devil, and he's presently at your elbow is by 1660s.

205klobrien2
helmikuu 28, 10:56 am

Connections
Puzzle #262
🟦🟨🟪🟨
🟦🟦🟦🟦 kinds of heels (Cuban, kitten, stiletto, wedge)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 cheeses, familiarly (American, blue, jack, Swiss)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 track and field equipment (hammer, hurdle, javelin, pole)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 double ____ (date, Dutch, jeopardy, space)

206ReneeMarie
helmikuu 28, 3:37 pm

>200 klobrien2: For my money, a concert's worse. Deafening decibel levels plus screaming fans. It's why I also avoid live albums.

The county fairs Mom took us to as kids weren't as bad for amps & screaming. I don't recall everyone we saw, but do remember Sha Na Na. Finding out as an adult that they were also at Woodstock was kind of freaky. We also saw the Gatlins, & either the Oak Ridge Boys or the Statlers. I still love the Statlers. Mom loved Elvis & country.

207klobrien2
helmikuu 28, 3:46 pm

>206 ReneeMarie: Good memories! Yes, it' a different experience at a live event vs. with quality audio playback equipment.

208ReneeMarie
helmikuu 28, 3:51 pm

>202 msf59: BZ & CGB I also saw at a club in Milwaukee. I think New Order was 1989 at Summerfest. If I'm remembering correctly, The Soup Dragons may have opened for them. Can't think when else I would've seen them. I still freakin' love New Order.

209klobrien2
helmikuu 29, 10:48 am

Yesterday, I watched the memorial to the two police officers and one fireman/EMT who were killed in the line of duty on Feb. 18 in Burnsville Minnesota. It was a very moving service (I might include this, gratefully, as part of my grief work). I also attended my church’s weekly Lenten service, so it was a big day for “Zooming” here. What a wonderful thing real-time streaming is!

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff.

Books I read yesterday: Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World—finished, The Mona Lisa Vanishes

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Watched 9. The Crusades Clash of Cultures, 1097-1291 and 10. Medieval Town and Trade Networks. Read 11. Cathedrals to Pagodas: Sacred Architecture, and 12. Universities and Intellectual Discovery. Will watch these today.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: Monarch: Legacy of Monsters episode 6.

210klobrien2
helmikuu 29, 10:57 am

Wordle 985 3/6 I thought for sure I had Wordle with my second guess, but there was one other possibility. Aarghh!irate, inane, image

🟧⬜🟧⬜🟧
🟧⬜🟧⬜🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: image (n.)
c. 1200, "piece of statuary; artificial representation that looks like a person or thing," from Old French image "image, likeness; figure, drawing, portrait; reflection; statue," earlier imagene (11c.), from Latin imaginem (nominative imago) "copy, imitation, likeness; statue, picture," also "phantom, ghost, apparition," figuratively "idea, appearance," from stem of imitari "to copy, imitate" (from PIE root *aim- "to copy").
The meaning "reflection in a mirror" is early 14c. The mental sense was in Latin, and appears in English late 14c. The sense of "public impression" is attested in isolated cases from 1908 but not in common use until its rise in the jargon of advertising and public relations, c. 1958.
To þe ymage of god he made hym Genesis i.27, Wycliffite Bible, early version, 1382
also from c. 1200
image (v.)
late 14c., "to form a mental picture (of something), imagine," from Old French imagier, from image (see image (n.)). Related: Imaged; imaging.

211richardderus
helmikuu 29, 11:04 am

>210 klobrien2: How interesting about the 1958 sense and its fifty-year march into the mainstream! I do love the etymologies, Karen O. Thanks for my daily doses.

212klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 29, 11:43 am

>211 richardderus: You are so welcome. The etymologies are so easy to get (thank you, etymonline.com!) and I continue to find them interesting. I’m glad you enjoy them!

Weekend is approaching! We are to have a really nice, sunny, high of 50 degrees F., or so. New York weather doesn’t look too bad either. Happy Thor’s Day!

P.s. and then I read on your thread that it’s quite windy, and chilly in NY. Sorry!

213klobrien2
helmikuu 29, 11:31 am

Connections
Puzzle #263
🟨🟩🟨🟨
🟩🟩🟩🟩 place to store valuables (chest, coffer, safe, vault
🟨🟨🟨🟨 propel into the air (hop, jump, leap, spring)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 period (age, day, era, time)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 animals backward (drib, flow, reed, tang)

214msf59
helmikuu 29, 11:35 am

Sweet Thursday, Karen. Did you see my post from yesterday morning? You may have missed me up there.

215klobrien2
helmikuu 29, 11:40 am

>201 figsfromthistle: Hi there! Sorry to have missed your post! And we are on to Thursday!

>202 msf59: I DID miss you, Mark! Sorry! And I’m so glad you are liking the Lucinda Williams album. I think that that album was the first one of hers I listened to. What a voice!

Thanks ti you both for visiting!

216klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 29, 12:17 pm



65.
The Field Guide to Dumb Birds of the Whole Stupid World by Matt Kracht



One off my massive TBR! Very funny book, follow-up to The Field Guide to Dumb Birds of North America. Lovely drawings of birds with fictitiously-hilarious names, assigned by the author. I think that one can pick up that the author really likes birds underneath. Felt pretty juvenile reading this, but it was just so much fun.

Here's an example. It's a list of "tenets" for birdwatching:

1. The welfare of the birds comes first
2. Try not to disturb the birds or impact their behavior.
3. Be respectful of the birds and don't get too close to them or their nests
4. Wear drab colors and try to blend in to the natural surroundings so you don't frighten the birds. (I have found that an unintended benefit of this rule is that it also makes it much easier to hide from other bird-watchers, many of whom are kind of annoying.)
5. Do not use audio playback or calls to attract birds. It can distract them from important activities such as feeding and breeding because they are stupid.
6. No flash photography; the birds don't like it.
7. Don't handle the birds.
8. Don't yell at the birds.
9. Don't trespass.
10. Use common courtesy.*

* "Sadly, we really shouldn't need to include this one in the rules, but after what happened at the last meeting of the Ornithological Society, we felt it was necessary. Enough said. But everyone know we're talking about you, Brian."

217klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 29, 3:55 pm

Rita Dove poem for the west garden entrance at the Folger:

Clear your calendars. Pocket your notes.
Look up into the blue amplitudes,
sun lolling on his throne, watching clouds
scrawl past, content with going nowhere.

No chart can calibrate the hush that settles
just before the first cricket song rises;
no list will recall a garden’s embroidery,
its fringed pinks and reds, its humble hedges.

Every day is Too Much or Never Enough,
so stop fretting your worth and berating
the cosmos – step into a house where
the jumbled perfumes of our human potpourri
waft up from a single page.

You can feel the world stop, lean in, and listen
as your heart starts up again.

218klobrien2
Muokkaaja: helmikuu 29, 6:54 pm

It's Thursday, so my son has been to the librar(ies) for me, and has brought me such a treasure-trove of illustrated books (thank you, whisper1 and others!) This afternoon I had my own little Illustrated Book Fest:



66.
The Moon's Almost Here by Patricia MacLachlan, ill Tomie de Paola



Charming little "it is bedtime" book. Sweet illustrations featuring a Pierrot (Pierrot is a "moonstruck" clown).



67.
Before She Was Harriet by Lesa Cline-Ransome, ill. James E. Ransome



Harriet Tubman has been a hero of mine since childhood. Although not a large woman, she was sometimes mistaken for a man because of her strength. She was very brave and tough, and did so much for others.

This book is a beauty, with wonderful, colorful paintings. The story is also superb, with the plot elements (Tubman's life) arranged from later to sooner; we first meet her as an elderly woman, than move backwards to what she was, BEFORE. Interesting twist on biography!



68.
Snowflakes Fall by Patricia MacLachlan, ill. Steven Kellogg



This book "portrays life's natural cycle: its beauty, its joy, and its sorrow." Steven Kellogg, the illustrator, lived in Sandy Hook for 35 years, and this book came about as a result of that connection to the community that had suffered such a horrible tragedy.

The illustration and writing is beautiful, the pages filled with humor and joy. The book ends with, "And we remember the children--No two the same--All beautiful."



69.
The Journey by Francesca Sanna



The illustrations in this book seem strikingly different from most painted or drawn picture book illustrations--almost as if they were crafted out of paper. In fact, just as the illustrations may be a collage, the story is a collage of immigrant stories. Very moving and beautiful.



70.
The Tale of the Saltan by Alexander Pushkin, paintings by Gennady Spirin



The illustrations are dazzling (of course), the story is silly (based on folk tales). There's lots of treachery, magic, and a mysterious Swan Queen. It is a gorgeous book.



71.
Before You Came by Patricia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest



Sweet, beautiful book about a mother and child. The magnificent colors of the illustrations just blew my mind! Gorgeous book, balm for winter-weary eyes.

"Before you came, I read books in the hammock piled high with pillows and a quilt. Some days I read all through the day, and hung lanterns and sparkling lights so I could read into the night."

219klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 9:53 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff.

Books I read yesterday: Illustrated Book Extravaganza! Six lovely picture books read (see entry above). Such a good time.

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Today I will watch: 11. Cathedrals to Pagodas: Sacred Architecture, and 12. Universities and Intellectual Discovery.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: Abbott Elementary 3.5, The Connors 6.4, Resident Alien 3.3

220klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 10:04 am

Wordle 986 2/6 Lucky second guess! Just trying to find the vowel and the ending letter and use the letters I had. irate, forty

⬜🟦⬜🟧⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: forty (adj., n.)
"1 more than thirty-nine, twice twenty; the number which is one more than thirty-nine; a symbol representing this number;" early 12c., feowerti, from Old English feowertig, Northumbrian feuortig "forty," from feower "four" (from PIE root *kwetwer- "four") + tig "group of ten" (see -ty (1)). Compare Old Saxon fiwartig, Old Frisian fiuwertich, Dutch veertig, Old High German fiorzug, German vierzig, Old Norse fjorir tigir, Gothic fidwor tigjus.
The number 40 must have been used very frequently by Mesha's scribe as a round number. It is probably often used in that way in the Bible where it is remarkably frequent, esp. in reference to periods of days or years. ... How it came to be so used is not quite certain, but it may have originated, partly at any rate, in the idea that 40 years constituted a generation or the period at the end of which a man attains maturity, an idea common, it would seem, to the Greeks, the Israelites, and the Arabs. "The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia," James Orr, ed., Chicago, 1915
Forty winks "short sleep" is attested from 1821; in early use associated with, and perhaps coined by, English eccentric and lifestyle reformer William Kitchiner M.D. (1775-1827). Forty-niner in U.S. history was an adventurer to California (usually from one of the eastern states) in search of fortune during the gold rush of 1849.

221klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 10:37 am

For once, I found today’s Connections pretty easy…

Connections
Puzzle #264
🟩🟩🟩🟩 wager (bet, gamble, risk, stake)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 Disneyland lands (adventure, fantasy, frontier, tomorrow)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 garlic bread ingredients (bread, butter, garlic, parsley)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 ____ bat (baseball, cricket, fruit, vampire)

222klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 1:27 pm

Yesterday’s treasure trove from the library brought me some music:

Lucinda Williams, “This Sweet Old World”
Emmylou Harris, “The Life and Songs of Emmylou Harris”
Dar Williams, “In the Time of Gods”

Good listening ahead of me, I’m sure!

223katiekrug
maaliskuu 1, 1:37 pm

As someone who swore her love for Dar Williams and may have influenced you to seek her out, I must admit that I can't vouch for that particular album. I am much more familiar with her earlier stuff, but I hope it's good and that you like it. Or at least enough to try more :)

224klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 1:49 pm

>223 katiekrug: I should look into the music apps. I’m pretty much limited to CDs from the library, and these are some of the CDs I found there. My home library had NO Dar Williams, but I found this one across the Mississippi (Minneapolis!) They’ve got a few more CDs. And books! What I Found in a Thousand Towns and How To Write a Song That Matters!

Thanks for pointing me in the direction of Williams! I’ll have more to say after some listening, I’m sure!

225klobrien2
maaliskuu 1, 5:20 pm

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (03/01/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Martin Dressler by Steven Willhauser -- p. 8 of 193
Tom Lake by Ann Patchett -- p. 29 of 278 (mine, on Nook)
Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club by J. Ryan Stradal -- p. 81 of 253 (mine, on Nook)
The Mona Lisa Vanishes by Nicholas Day, art by Brett Helquist -- p. 15 of 276
The Puzzle Master by Danielle Trussoni -- p. 27 of 343
Devil's Delight (Agatha Raisin #33) by M. C. Beaton -- p. 72 of 244
Ragnarok: The End of the Gods by A. S. Byatt -- p. 0 of 177
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 8 of 193
No Cure for Being Human by Kate Bowler -- p. 31 of 202
Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Romantic Comedy by Curtis Sittenfeld -- p. 20 of 300
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In March, we are reading Truman Capote. I will read Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories -- p. 10 of 142

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Course is:
The Middle Ages Around the World, 12 of 24 lectures read/watched.

226msf59
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 1, 6:38 pm

While I was listening to several of Lucinda Williams LPs, I did listen to This Sweet Old World. It may not be as edgy as Car Wheels but is still a solid album. Her self-titled from 1988, is also a good listen.

Glad to hear you are joining us on Martin Dressler. I am nearly 100 pages in and enjoying it.

227ReneeMarie
maaliskuu 1, 6:39 pm

>221 klobrien2: I, too, scored perfect today, and in mostly the same order. Except I got blue last. I've never been to any Disney park & have never wanted to go, so I have zero knowledge. Good thing the last one is always a gimme.

228ReneeMarie
maaliskuu 1, 7:30 pm

>222 klobrien2: I got out my L Williams & D Williams CDs & will have a fresh listen.

I once walked into the music department of a bookstore & asked for Dar Williams and Lucinda Williams. As the musicseller was leading me to the right section, I claimed that I only listen to artists named Williams. He didn't laugh, but I was behind him so I like to think he at least smiled at my joke.

229ReneeMarie
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 1, 7:37 pm

>224 klobrien2: When I want to hear songs from a particular artist/album, I usually put the keywords into a search engine. It usually finds opportunities for me to listen, often YouTube. I am still into CDs, not streaming. And the only vinyl I've bought for decades is two Bing Crosby Xmas LPs.

230klobrien2
maaliskuu 2, 10:25 am

>226 msf59: looking forward to listening to any Lucinda Williams I can get. And I am on page 8 of Martin Dressler! Already, such a sense of place and Martin’s character. I’m sure I’ll like the read.

>227 ReneeMarie: Funny about the record store encounter! I like the ease and efficiency of CDs, but have been known to hunt down particular songs on Youtube. It’s very handy that way!

I’ve done some clearing out of CDs and cassette tapes (!) after my husband’s passing. I still have 6-8 feet of LPs that I haven’t looked at in ages. I have a fully functioning turntable. Maybe soon I’ll get to them.

Thank you both for stopping by to chat!

231klobrien2
maaliskuu 2, 10:35 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff.

Books I read yesterday: Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Three Stories by Truman Capote, Martin Dressler by Steven Millhauser, Devil’s Delight by M. C. Beaton

Magazines: NYT Magazine (2/11), Scientific American (Feb)

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Watched: 11. Cathedrals to Pagodas: Sacred Architecture, and 12. Universities and Intellectual Discovery.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: More network shows (missed them over the very long strike-related hiatus!): Feud 2.6, Ghosts 3.3, Not Dead Yet 2.4, Young Sheldon 7.3, Elsbeth 1.1.

Listening: Live Aid DVD

232klobrien2
maaliskuu 2, 10:56 am

Wordle 987 3/6 irate, arbor, urban

⬜🟧🟦⬜⬜
🟦🟧🟧⬜⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: urban (adj.)
"characteristic of city life, pertaining to cities or towns," 1610s (but rare before 1830s), from Latin urbanus "of or pertaining to a city or city life; in Rome," also "in city fashion, polished, refined, cultivated, courteous," but also sometimes "witty, facetious, bold, impudent;" as a noun, "city dweller," from urbs (genitive urbis) "city, walled town," a word of unknown origin.
The word gradually emerged in this sense as urbane became restricted to manners and styles of expression. In late 20c. American English gradually acquiring a suggestion of "African-American." Urban renewal, euphemistic for "slum clearance," is attested from 1955, American English. Urban sprawl recorded by 1958. Urban legend attested by 1980.
also from 1610s
Urban
masc. proper name, from Latin urbanus "refined, courteous," literally "of a city" (see urban (adj.)).

233weird_O
maaliskuu 2, 11:01 am

Glad you've joined us in Martin Dressler.

234BLBera
maaliskuu 2, 11:13 am

The picture books sound great, Karen.

I love the Rita Dove poem.

>209 klobrien2: This was so sad. My SIL used to be a police officer, and he said domestics were the most dangerous calls.

Have a lovely weekend.

235klobrien2
maaliskuu 2, 1:10 pm

>233 weird_O: I’m looking forward to Martin Dressler! Now we’ll have to catch up to Mark and Stasia and whoever else is reading.

>234 BLBera: Hi there! Happy weekend!

236alcottacre
maaliskuu 2, 1:16 pm

>230 klobrien2: Already, such a sense of place and Martin’s character.

I agree - and I am not as far into it as Mark is. I sure hope that continues throughout!

237klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 2, 1:18 pm

Connections
Puzzle #265
🟩🟩🟩🟩 units in poetry (foot, line, meter, verse)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 express indirectly (couch, imply, intimate, suggest)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 intelligence operative (agent, asset, mole, sleeper)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 what “k” might mean (Kelvin, okay, potassium, thousand)

238klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 3, 12:32 pm

>236 alcottacre: Hi, Stasia! Hope your weekend is going well and that you are feeling good! Thanks for stopping by!

239klobrien2
maaliskuu 3, 12:41 pm

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff. Attend online church (our senior pastor’s “Farewell and Godspeed” service).

Books I read yesterday: Devil’s Delight by M. C. Beaton

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Read: 13. Life in a Medieval Palace, and 14. Medieval Tales of Heroes and Lovers.

Grief reading (and writing?).

Watching: So Help Me Todd 2.3, The Rookie 6.2, “Inspector Morse” 8.5 (the last one!). I enjoyed the series very much, as I enjoyed “Endeavour”; I look forward to starting up “Inspector Lewis.”

Listening: Live Aid DVD—finished disc 1 of 4.

240klobrien2
maaliskuu 3, 12:48 pm

I was ready to just give up. My first word worked out so great, but there are so many share-alikes in the English language! My winning streak continues at 8! (snort)

Wordle 988 6/6 irate, plate, ovate, abate, skate, state

⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
⬜⬜🟧🟧🟧
🟧⬜🟧🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: state (n.1)
mode or form of existence c. 1200, stat, "circumstances, position in society, temporary attributes of a person or thing, conditions," from Old French estat "position, condition; status, stature, station," and directly from Latin status "a station, position, place; way of standing, posture; order, arrangement, condition," figuratively "standing, rank; public order, community organization."
This is a noun of action from the past-participle stem of stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm"). Some Middle English senses are via Old French estat (French état; see estate). The Latin word was adopted into other modern Germanic languages (German, Dutch staat) but chiefly in the political senses only.
The meanings "physical condition as regards form or structure," "particular condition or phase," and "condition with reference to a norm" are attested from c. 1300. The meaning "mental or emotional condition" is attested from 1530s (the phrase state of mind is attested by 1749); the specific colloquial sense of "an agitated or perturbed condition" is from 1837.
The meaning "splendor of ceremony, etc., appropriate to high office; dignity and pomp befitting a person of high degree" is from early 14c. Hence to lie in state "be ceremoniously exposed to view before interment" (1705) and keep state "conduct oneself with pompous dignity" (1590s).
He the President shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient. U.S. Constitution, Article II, Section iii
Sense in quantum physics is by 1913.
also from c. 1200
state (v.)
1590s, "to set in a position, fix (a date, etc.)," from state (n.1) "circumstances, position." The sense of "declare, recite, set down in detail in words" is attested by 1640s from the notion of "placing" the words on the record. Related: Stated; stating.
also from 1590s
state (n.2)
"political organization of a country; supreme civil power, the government; the whole people considered as a body politic," 1530s, from special use of state (n.1); this sense grew out of the meaning "condition of a country" with regard to government, prosperity, etc. (late 13c.), from Latin phrases such as status rei publicæ "condition (or existence) of the republic."
The sense of "a semi-independent political entity under a federal authority, one of the bodies politic which together make up a federal republic" is from 1774. The British North American colonies occasionally were called states as far back as 1630s.
State rights in U.S. political sense is attested from 1798 (the form states rights is recorded by 1824): the doctrine that states retain all rights and privileges not delegated to the federal government in the Constitution, in its extreme form including the power and right of sovereignty.
Often contrasted with ecclesiastical power in phrase church and state (1580s). State socialism attested from 1850 as "a scheme of government favoring enlargement of state functions as the directest way to achieve socialist goals."

241atozgrl
maaliskuu 3, 6:24 pm

>240 klobrien2: Hi Karen, I hope you're having a good Sunday! Wordle took me 4 today, and I had all the letters but the second one in order after my initial word. Taking so long to get it was a combination of multiple possibilities, plus the usual where I didn't think of a repeated letter right away. Frustrating, because it seems so obvious and like I should have gotten it quicker.

The etymology was interesting to me, because I would have thought that the second noun sense would have arisen earlier, and I certainly had no idea that it was based on the first noun meaning. When I see the word, I think of the second sense first.

242klobrien2
maaliskuu 4, 10:45 am

>241 atozgrl: Hello, there! I’m often surprised by the etymologies—that’s what keeps me doing the captures every day.

Thanks for stopping by!

243klobrien2
maaliskuu 4, 10:57 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff.

Books I read yesterday: Devil’s Delight by M. C. Beaton, Through Grandpa’s Eyes, My Father’s Words.

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading (and writing?). My Father’s Words and the song “Dona Nobis Pacem”

Watching: Life and Beth, eps. 2.7-10. Great season, great show. Margaret Cho as an OB/GYN!

Listening: “Dona Nobis Pacem”—the recording by Waring School is wonderful! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5FZAk497D4

244klobrien2
maaliskuu 4, 12:10 pm

Wordle 989 3/6 irate, blame, flame

⬜⬜🟧⬜🟧
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: flame (n.)
Middle English flaume, also flaumbe, flambe, flame, flamme, mid-14c., "a flame;" late 14c., "a flaming mass, a fire; fire in general, fire as an element;" also figurative, in reference to the "heat" or "fire" of emotions, from Anglo-French flaume, flaumbe "a flame" (Old French flambe, 10c.), from Latin flammula "small flame," diminutive of flamma "flame, blazing fire," from PIE *bhleg- "to shine, flash," from root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn."
The meaning "a sweetheart, object of one's passion" is attested from 1640s; the figurative sense of "burning passion" was in Middle English, and the nouns in Old French and Latin also meant "fire of love, flame of passion," and, in Latin "beloved object." The Australian flame-tree is from 1857, so called for its red flowers.
also from mid-14c.
flame (v.)
Middle English flaumen, also flaumben, flomben, flamben, flamen, flammen, c. 1300 (implied in flaming "to shine (like fire), gleam, sparkle like flames;" mid-14c. as "emit flames, be afire, to blaze," from Anglo-French flaumer, flaumber (Old French flamber) "burn, be on fire, be alight" (intransitive), from flamme "a flame" (see flame (n.)).
Transitive meaning "to burn, set on fire" is from 1580s. Meaning "break out in violence of passion" is from 1540s; the sense of "unleash invective on a computer network" is from 1980s. Related: Flamed; flaming. To flame out, in reference to jet engines, is from 1950.

245klobrien2
maaliskuu 4, 12:46 pm

Connections
Puzzle #267
🟦🟦🟦🟦 seen during easter (bunny, egg, jelly bean, peep)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 rooms in the game clue (hall, library, lounge, study)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 colleague (associate, fellow, partner, peer)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 what a mole can be (animal, birthmark spy, unit)

246klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 4, 1:46 pm

A few more Patricia MacLachlan books: these are more developed than "picture books," though they do have illustrations. They were balm for my soul this weekend. Thanks again to whisper1 for her guidance!



72.
Through Grandpa's Eyes by Patricia MacLachlan, picture by Deborah Ray



The dedication for this book: "For my father, Philo, and my son, John, each of whom has taught me to see the world through his eyes."

Sweet story about a boy and his grandfather. The grandfather has lost his vision, but uses his other senses to go through the world. He teaches his grandson to do the same.

This is listed as as MacLachlan's SECOND picture book. I went on a mission to find the first, and have now requested The Sick Day from ILL.



73.
My Father's Words by Patricia MacLachlan



This book follows the previous by nearly forty years in time. I loved this "chapter book," which is about grief and remembering and making good out of bad. It was a perfect fit for me in my grieving, and put me back in remembrance of the great song, "Dona Nobis Pacem." Here is a link to the Waring School recording of that song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5FZAk497D4

247klobrien2
maaliskuu 4, 3:30 pm

HELL AND EARTH
“I know, you never intended to be in this world.
But you're in it all the same.
So why not get started immediately.
I mean, belonging to it.
There is so much to admire, to weep over.
And to write music or poems about.
Bless the feet that take you to and fro.
Bless the eyes and the listening ears.
Bless the tongue, the marvel of taste.
Bless touching.
You could live a hundred years, it's happened.
Or not.
I am speaking from the fortunate platform of many years,
none of which, I think, I ever wasted.
Do you need a prod?
Do you need a little darkness to get you going?
Let me be as urgent as a knife, then, and remind you of Keats,
so single of purpose and thinking, for a while,
he had a lifetime.”
~Mary Oliver, from Blue Horses

248klobrien2
maaliskuu 5, 10:56 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff.

Books I read yesterday: Devil’s Delight by M. C. Beaton, Classic Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, Ragnarok: End of the Gods by A. S. Byatt

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Watched: 13. Life in a Medieval Palace, and 14. Medieval Tales of Heroes and Lovers. Read: 15. Mongol Conquests From China to Russia, and 16. Marco Polo Travels East to China

Grief reading (and writing?)

Watching: New show on Apple+: “The Completely Made-up Adventures of Dick Turpin” with Noel Fielding, first episode. Very funny!

Listening: Live Aid DVD, first part of disc 2 (Beach Boys!, Dire Straits!, Queen!)

249klobrien2
maaliskuu 5, 11:03 am

Poem that whisper1 posted at her thread, and which I am “borrowing.”

When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d

When lilacs last in the dooryard bloom’d,
And the great star early droop’d in the western sky in the night,
I mourn’d, and yet shall mourn with ever-returning spring.

Ever-returning spring, trinity sure to me you bring,
Lilac blooming perennial and drooping star in the west,
And thought of him I love.

—Walt Whitman

250alcottacre
maaliskuu 5, 11:15 am

>246 klobrien2: Unfortunately my local library does not have either of those.

Have a terrific Tuesday, Karen!

251klobrien2
maaliskuu 5, 11:18 am

Missed Wordle today…maybe my mind was elsewhere today.

Wordle 990 X/6 irate, cloud, scuff, lucky, punch, bunch, (hunch)
⬜⬜⬜⬜⬜
🟦⬜⬜🟦⬜
⬜🟦🟦⬜⬜
⬜🟧🟦⬜⬜
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧
⬜🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: hunch (v.)
"raise or bend into a hump," 1650s; earlier "to push, thrust" (c. 1500), of unknown origin. Perhaps a variant of bunch (v.). Related: Hunched; hunching.
also from 1650s
hunch (n.)
1620s, "a push, thrust," from hunch (v.) in its older sense. Figurative sense of "a hint, a tip" (a "push" toward a solution or answer), first recorded 1849, led to that of "premonition, presentiment" (1904).

252richardderus
maaliskuu 5, 2:54 pm

>251 klobrien2: Coulda used one today, eh what...that word is a weirdo in our magpie mother tongue. Enjoy the week! *smooch*

253klobrien2
maaliskuu 5, 3:11 pm

>252 richardderus: Yes, I definitely could have used one. I laughed when the etymology said, "of unknown origin. Perhaps..." They should just have said, "We have no idea!"

*smooch* right back to you, Richard. Have a nice day!

254klobrien2
maaliskuu 5, 3:19 pm




74.
Devil's Delight (Agatha Raisin #33) by M. C. Beaton



This one was fun, pretty standard Agatha Raisin. New element of a naturist club (I can't believe M. C. Beaton never tried that out, but R. W. Green did.

Only one book left in the series? Then I'll be caught up.

255msf59
maaliskuu 6, 7:54 am

Happy Wednesday, Karen. I finished Martin Dressler. Working on my review. I was a bit underwhelmed but still glad to have read it. I hope you can stick it out.

I know we like talking and sharing films and I remember you enjoying a few Howard Hawks films. I rewatched a dandy- Scarface, the original. I had forgot how darn good it is and Muni is excellent. I am following it up with a rewatch of the remake from 1983. It actually follows the storyline of the first one but goes pretty far with it's excesses. I am still a fan of it.

I love the Oliver poem. Wow! She rocks!

256Owltherian
maaliskuu 6, 7:55 am

Hiya Karen, hope your day is going okay.

257msf59
maaliskuu 6, 7:57 am



^On the music front I am listening to Bjork's LP "Debut", which is another masterpiece. I will then listen to her next 2 LPS which are as equally brilliant. Are you a fan?

258klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 9:49 am

>255 msf59: Hi, Mark! Haven’t gotten any further with Martin Dressler, but I think I’ll keep going with it, if only to to come up with a more positive view of it.

“Scarface,” hmm? It might be worth a look (I trust your movie recommendations). Might be a little too on the violent side for me.

I’m starting up a watch/rewatch of Norman Jewison films. I’ll be starting with “Forty Pounds of Trouble” (a childhood favorite) and “The Thrill of It All.” Gotta make some popcorn to watch those films!

Thanks for stopping by! I keep up with your thread and enjoy reading about all that’s going with you.

259klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 9:50 am

>256 Owltherian: Hi there, Lily! My day is going fine. Hope yours is, too.

260klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 9:52 am

>257 msf59: Well, I haven’t sought out her music, but seems I should. I’ll look for the “Debut” album. Thanks!

261Owltherian
maaliskuu 6, 9:56 am

>259 klobrien2: People almost got one of my friends IP banned and now I'm angry so I'm prob gonna hunt them down on this site- soooo that's kinda how my day is going.

262klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 6, 10:22 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff. Grocery list.

Books I read yesterday: Dead on Target by M. C. Beaton

Magazines: New Yorker (3/4) and (3/11)

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Watched: 15. Mongol Conquests From China to Russia, and 16. Marco Polo Travels East to China. Read: 17. Medieval Pilgrims and Travelers, and 18. Fictional Travels and Monstrous Races.

Grief reading

Watching: “Bob (Hearts) Abishola,” episodes 5.4 and 5.5. I read that this is the last season (sad). Watched Britbox’s “Agatha Christie’s Murder is Easy” (complete in two episodes). This adaptation changes the time period to the ‘50s (from the ‘30s); the leading man is a black cultural anthropologist from Nigeria, and the film addresses racism and sexism. I really enjoyed the series. Very Christy-esque, but more accessible.

Listening:

263klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 10:10 am

>261 Owltherian: Don’t know what to say to that, other than you should save your energies for positive things and avoid people and places that bring negativity!

264Owltherian
maaliskuu 6, 10:10 am

>263 klobrien2: I guess so, but they did kind of start it saying they were going to get me banned when i didn't do anything

265klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 10:21 am

Very pleased with today’s solve after yesterday’s!

Wordle 991 2/6 irate, teary

⬜🟦🟧🟦🟦
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: close as the site comes to “teary”: tear (n.1)
fluid drop from the eye Middle English ter, tere, from Old English tear, teor "tear, drop, nectar, what is distilled in drops," from earlier teahor, tæhher, from Proto-Germanic *tahr-, *tagr- (source also of Old Norse, Old Frisian tar, Old High German zahar, German Zähre, Gothic tagr "tear"), from PIE *dakru- (source also of Latin lacrima, Old Latin dacrima, Irish der, Welsh deigr, Greek dakryma).
Plural tears in the figurative sense of "grief, sorrow" is from mid-14c. To be in tears "weeping" is from 1550s. Figurative tears of blood "heartfelt tears of compassion" is by c. 1300. Tear gas is so called by 1917. Tear-stained "marked with tears" is from 1590s.

266klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 10:50 am

Connections
Puzzle #269
🟩🟩🟩🟩 legal terms (action, claim, complaint, lawsuit)
🟨🟨🟨🟨 parts of an airport (hangar, runway, tarmac, terminal)
🟦🟪🟪🟪
🟦🟪🟦🟦
🟪🟪🟪🟪 words ending in clothing (foxglove, gumshoe, turncoat, windsock)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 things a juggler juggles (beanbag, club, ring, torch)

267ReneeMarie
maaliskuu 6, 8:17 pm

>258 klobrien2: Ha! The Thrill of It All is awesome. So hilarious. It's one I own on DVD.

268klobrien2
maaliskuu 6, 11:52 pm

>267 ReneeMarie: Oh, good! I figured James Garner and Doris Day would be pretty great together! Thanks for the tip!

269ReneeMarie
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 7, 6:36 am

>268 klobrien2: The first time I saw it (at 17) I laughed like a loon. Which was not good because I had just had jaw surgery (thanks to an alcoholic orthodontist) and my jaw was wired shut. Yikes.

270klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 7, 9:41 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff. Doctor appt.

Books I read yesterday: : Classic Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen

Magazines:

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Watched: 17. Medieval Pilgrims and Travelers, and 18. Fictional Travels and Monstrous Races.

Grief reading

Watching: “Dick Turpin” ep 2. Guest was Greg Davies (from “The Cleaner”), who made an excellent highwayman. Funny show!
“Monarch” ep. 7. The story arc is dragging a little, but only 3 episodes left. Brief monster visit (more monsters, please!)

Listening: Live Aid, rest of disc 2. Bowie! Pretenders! The Who! Elton John!

271klobrien2
maaliskuu 7, 9:49 am

Wordle 992 5/6 irate, globe, elope, clove, clone

⬜⬜⬜⬜🟧
⬜🟧🟧⬜🟧
⬜🟧🟧⬜🟧
🟧🟧🟧⬜🟧
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: clone (n.)
1903, in botany, "group of cultivated plants each of which is a transplanted part of one original," from Latinized form of Greek klōn "a twig, spray," related to klados "sprout, young branch, offshoot of a plant," possibly from PIE root *kel- (1) "to strike, cut" (see holt). Meaning "person or animal replicated from a single cell of another and genetically identical to it" is by 1970 (theoretical). Figurative use, "one who slavishly imitates another," is by 1978.
also from 1903
clone (v.)
1959, from clone (n.). Extension to genetic duplication of animals and human beings is from 1970. Related: Cloned; cloning.

272klobrien2
maaliskuu 7, 10:47 am

Connections
Puzzle #270
🟨🟨🟨🟨 shared (collective, common, joint, mutual)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 rid of contents (clear, drain, empty, flush)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 ____ dream (American, fever, lucid, pipe)
🟦🟦🟦🟦 associated with dtub (cigarette, pencil, ticket, toe)

273Kristelh
maaliskuu 7, 3:23 pm

Great job on connections Karen.

274klobrien2
maaliskuu 7, 4:22 pm

>273 Kristelh: Thanks! Makes up a little for the days it leaves me in the dust! When I can figure out the purple level before solving the whole thing, I really count it a success.

Thanks for stopping by!

275Kristelh
maaliskuu 8, 7:30 am

>274 klobrien2:, I agree with that Karen. Purple seems to more default that actual successful solving.

276klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 11:47 am

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff. Dentist appt first thing.

Books I read yesterday: :

Magazines: NYT Magazine (2/25)

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World:

Grief reading

Watching: “Monarch” eps. 8 and 9. One episode left! Feud: Capote vs. the Swans ep. 7, Resident Alien ep. 3.4, The Rookie ep 6.3, Animal Control ep. 2.1.

Listening:

277klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 11:53 am

Wordle 993 4/6 irate, clear, harem, early

⬜🟦🟦⬜🟦
⬜🟦🟦🟦🟦
⬜🟧🟧🟦⬜
🟧🟧🟧🟧🟧

Etymonline.com: early (adv.)
Old English ærlice "early, near the initial point of some reckoning in time," from ær "soon, ere" (see ere) + -lice, adverbial suffix (see -ly (2)). Compare Old Norse arliga "early." The adjective is Old English ærlic. The early bird of the proverb is from 1670s. Related: Earlier; earliest.

278klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 1:06 pm

Connections
Puzzle #271
🟨🟨🟨🟨 things to sew (dsrt, hem, pleat, seam
🟦🟦🟦🟦 sharp quality (bite, edge, punch, spice)
🟩🟩🟩🟩 ways to preserve food (can, cure, dry, freeze)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 birds minus last letter (condo, haw, hero, loo)

279klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 1:58 pm



75.
Classic Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen, adapted by Valeria Manferto, ill. Francesca Rossi



Well-done collection of fairy tales, with charming illustrations. Some of the fairy tales I'd heard of before, some not. My one complaint is that the book is outsized; difficult to leaf through. Why make the pages so big?

These are the stories included in this volume; The Little Mermaid, The Princess and the Pea, The Tin Soldier, The Emperor's New Clothes, The Snow Queen, The Tinderbox, The Wild Swans, The Nightingale, Thumbelina.

280msf59
maaliskuu 8, 6:48 pm

Happy Friday, Karen. How is Feud: Capote vs. the Swans? I was curious about that one. I like the cast. We have been enjoying Poker Face S1. Have you heard of it?

281klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 11:01 pm

>280 msf59: Yes! LOVE Poker Face! I'm all up-to-date on it; I hope there will be a season three. Natasha Lyonne is great (and she is so cool!)

I'm really liking Feud. I wasn't sure when I first started the series, but the acting is top notch. Tom Hollander is amazing--he becomes Truman Capote. There are only three episodes left in the season.

Nice to see you here! Have a wonderful weekend!

282klobrien2
maaliskuu 8, 11:08 pm

Friday Reading Roundup!

Because I rely on libraries so much for my reading (and do so much eBook reading), what I'm reading at any given time changes often, and changes quickly.

Karen's current reading (03/08/24):

Actively reading (or soon will be!)

Dead on Target (Agatha Raisin #34) by M. C. Beaton (R. W. Green) -- p. 58 of 242
Tom Lake by Ann Patchett -- p. 29 of 278 (mine, on Nook)
Saturday Night at the Lakeside Supper Club by J. Ryan Stradal -- p. 81 of 253 (mine, on Nook)
The Mona Lisa Vanishes by Nicholas Day, art by Brett Helquist -- p. 15 of 276
The Puzzle Master by Danielle Trussoni -- p. 27 of 343
Ragnarok: The End of the Gods by A. S. Byatt -- p. 13 of 177
Leave Me Alone, I'm Reading: Finding and Losing Myself in Books by Maureen Corrigan -- p. 8 of 193
No Cure for Being Human by Kate Bowler -- p. 31 of 202
Organizing for the Rest of Us by Dana K. White
Danny, the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl
Notes on Grief by Chimimande Nyozi Adichie
The Perfect Passion Company by Alexander McCall Smith

Unnatural Habits (Phryne Fisher #19) by Kerry Greenwood -- p. 62 of 255
Career of Evil (Cormoran Strike #3) by Robert Galbraith -- p. 33 of 439

I'm overbooked! I don't want to lose track of these books, but I can't truly say that I am actively reading them right now:

Braiding Sweetgrass (for Rosalita)
The River We Remember by William Kent Krueger -- p. 82 of 421 (Nook)
Abide With Me by Elizabeth Strout -- p. 7 of 273
Mad Honey by Jodi Picoult and Jennifer Finney Boylan -- p. 41 of 436
Crook Manifesto by Colson Whitehead -- p. 73 of 288 (Nook)
Agatha's First Case (Agatha Raisin #0.5) by M. C. Beaton (Nook)
The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols by Nicholas Meyer -- p. 3 of 238
Marple: Twelve New Stories by assorted authors
Fairy Tale by Stephen King

I try to participate in the American Authors Challenge. In March, we are reading Truman Capote. I will read Breakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories -- p. 14 of 142

I usually am reading/watching Great Courses. My current Great Course is:
The Middle Ages Around the World, 20 of 24 lectures read/watched.

283richardderus
maaliskuu 9, 9:07 am

How goes your Capote trip? They are fast reads, in my experience. It will be interesting to hear about your idea of him. Happy weekend! *smooch*

284Kristelh
maaliskuu 9, 10:15 am

Wishing you a happy weekend, Karen. I did check out Strands. I had not heard of it.

285klobrien2
maaliskuu 9, 1:15 pm

Today: Puzzles and papers and LT (the everyday things). Mobility exercises. Adulting admin stuff. Minnesota Quilters meeting! That’s why I’m late getting here, but it was a great meeting, about the early days of the group.

Books I read yesterday: : Picture book fiesta! Zin! Zin! Zin!: A Violin by Lloyd Moss, I Am Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Brad Meltzer, Wildful by Kengo Kurimoto, All the Places to Love by Patricia MacLachlan, Snow White and Rose Red by Grimm brothers, ill. Gennedy Spirin.

Magazines: NYT Book Review (2/25), Booklist (2/15), Atlantic Monthly (March).

Great Course: The Middle Ages Around the World: Read and watched: 19. High Middle Ages in the Pacific: Polynesia and 20. High Middle Ages in the Americas.

Grief reading”Wilderness” (Lent devotional from church). Really meaningful, and you get to color sometimes! Also, Wildful from reading list. Good day for grief reading.

Watching: “Dick Turpin” ep. 3 (I really like this show!), Ghosts ep 3.4, Young Sheldon ep. 7.4.

Listening:

286klobrien2
maaliskuu 9, 1:36 pm

Wordle 994 4/6 irate, refer, sheer, cheer

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Etymonline.com: cheer (n.)
c. 1200, "the face, countenance," especially as expressing emotion, from Anglo-French chere "the face," Old French chiere "face, countenance, look, expression," from Late Latin cara "face" (source also of Spanish cara), possibly from Greek kara "head" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). From mid-13c. as "frame of mind, state of feeling, spirit; mood, humor."
By late 14c. the meaning had extended metaphorically to "state or temper of mind as indicated by expression." This could be in a good or bad sense ("The feend ... beguiled her with treacherye, and brought her into a dreerye cheere," "Merline," c. 1500), but a positive sense, "state of gladness or joy" (probably short for good cheer), has predominated since c. 1400.
The meaning "that which makes cheerful or promotes good spirits" is from late 14c. The meaning "shout of encouragement" is recorded by 1720, perhaps nautical slang (compare the earlier verbal sense "encourage by words or deeds," early 15c.). The antique English greeting what cheer? (mid-15c.) was picked up by Algonquian Indians of southern New England from the Puritans and spread in Native American languages as far as Canada.
also from c. 1200
cheer (v.)
late 14c., cheren, "to humor, console, dispel despondency;" c. 1400 as "entertain with food or drink," from cheer (n.). Related: Cheered; cheering. The sense of "to encourage by words or deeds" is early 15c., and this had focused to "salute with shouts of applause" by late 18c. Cheer up (intransitive) is attested by 1670s.

287Owltherian
maaliskuu 9, 1:38 pm

Hiya Karen! How is your weekend going?

288klobrien2
maaliskuu 9, 2:08 pm

Connections
Puzzle #272
🟨🟨🟨🟨 eat voraciously (down, inhale, scarf, wolf)
🟦🟩🟦🟦
🟩🟩🟩🟩 areas of academic focus (
🟦🟦🟦🟦 concentration, degree, major, minor)
🟪🟪🟪🟪 space ____ (bar, cadet, heater, station)

289klobrien2
Muokkaaja: maaliskuu 9, 3:46 pm

This week's "Picture Book Fiesta!" because son Jerry brought me treasures from the library. As always, thanks to whisper1 and other for pointing me to these wonderful, calming, lovely, brilliant books.



76.
Zin! Zin! Zin!: A Violin by Lloyd Moss, ill. Marjorie Priceman



This is a beautiful, very fun book. It serves as both an introduction to orchestras, the instruments that make them up, and counting. There are some very funny cats, a mouse, and a dog; make sure to look for them. The completely-introduced orchestra is diverse, in both gender and color (and shape!); the conductor looks like Leonard Bernstein! Just a lot of fun to read, especially out loud.



77.
I Am Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Brad Meltzer (yes, that Brad Meltzer!), ill. Christopher Eliopoulos



Little gem of a book. The life of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, set in historical context. One of my favorite bits about this book is that the end papers feature a pattern of lace collars and jabots. A really sweet book, packed with information and details. Includes bibliographies for adults and children.



78.
Wildful by Kengo Kurimoto



Poppy, a girl whose grandmother has passed away, walks around the neighborhood with her dog, Pepper, to try to deal with her grief. She is unable to get her grieving mother to leave the apartment. Poppy and Pepper meet up with Rob, who has discovered the secret to seeing nature, and the beautiful in everything..."If you listen...really listen...you hear it...something alive...something wild. And it's joy."

Fantastic drawings--they are beautifully detailed, but quiet and elegant. Nature, in all its forms, is presented (birds, critters, trees and plants,...). There are very few words in this book, but so much is communicated.

"Exploration of grief, love and finding magic in the wilderness--and in ourselves."

Can't say enough about this little treasure. I am giving it 5 stars.



79.
All the Places to Love by Patricia MacLachlan, paintings by Mike Wimmer



Lovely book by MacLachlan and Wimmer. "Moving homage to the American farm."



80.
Snow White and Rose Red by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, from the translation by May Sellars, ill. Gennedy Spirin



Beautiful paintings, of course (Gennady Spirin). Classic story of the two sisters and their encounters with the wild. "Ability of simple goodness to overcome evil."

290FAMeulstee
maaliskuu 9, 6:10 pm

>279 klobrien2: Congratulations on reaching 75, Karen!

291figsfromthistle
maaliskuu 9, 7:36 pm

Congrats on reading well past 75 books!

292klobrien2
maaliskuu 9, 10:50 pm

>290 FAMeulstee: >291 figsfromthistle: Thank you both! I’ve really enjoyed my reading. To a large extent, I look to recreate my childhood love.

See you both on my new thread?

293ArlieS
maaliskuu 18, 2:44 pm

>156 klobrien2: Overbooked: the story of my life.
Tämä viestiketju jatkuu täällä: Klobrien2 Karen O Books and Life in 2024 - Part 3.