100 Hour ReadaThing Quotes

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100 Hour ReadaThing Quotes

Tämä viestiketju on "uinuva" —viimeisin viesti on vanhempi kuin 90 päivää. Ryhmä "virkoaa", kun lähetät vastauksen.

1PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 5, 2011, 10:30am

I love reading quotes! Inspired by the 100 Hour ReadaThing please share a quote from page 100 of your book or from the 100th page you've read during the ReadaThing.

(If you just have a good quote to share we'd love to read that too!)

2jbd1
marraskuu 5, 2011, 11:25am

Great idea!

From p. 100 of A Study in Sherlock:

"'Have either of you been to the United States before?' Allen asked.

'I have,' Holmes said. 'In 1879 I traveled here with a Shakespeare company as Hamlet. I hope to play a less tragic part on this visit.'"

3mirrani
marraskuu 5, 2011, 11:43am

T'Met felt the weight of certainty settle upon her bones. They will overwhelm us, she thought. No matter the tactics we bring to bear against them.

From page 100 of To Brave The Storm ba Michael A. Martin

4Jacksonian
marraskuu 5, 2011, 12:50pm

We calculated that all this to-ing and fro-ing with the print shop, the bindery, the replacement of all the first signatures with the wrong title page -- in other words, it created a confusion that spread to all the new books we had in stock, whole runs had to be scrapped, volumes already distributed had to be recalled from the booksellers...

From page 100 of If on a Winter's Night a Traveler by Italo Calvino

5Ameise1
marraskuu 5, 2011, 1:21pm

Danny thought: No animals, it just isn't right. But - have Doc Layman do organ taps on Goines, his body parts near the mutilations, tests for a second, nonhuman, blood type. He threw Booth Conklin a long-shot question. "What kind of people buy dogs from you?"

From page 100 of The Big Nowhere by James Ellroy

6PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 5, 2011, 1:24pm

Sherlock Holmes always has the greatest quotes!

I love how these quotes are so packed with meaning if you're reading the book, and bring people in who haven't read them.

7PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 5, 2011, 1:28pm

"...A is one. C is three. H is eight. E is five. L is twelve. Eighteen, one, three, eight, five, and twelve. Add 'em up, guys, and what do you get?"

"Jesus," Cawley said softly.

"Forty-seven," Chuck said, his eyes gone wide, staring at the sheet of paper over Teddy's chest.

from page 100 of Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane

8Neverwithoutabook
marraskuu 5, 2011, 6:42pm

"Hudson sat cross-legged on the parlor rug, his back against a table leg and a gaming device in his hands. Blips of melodic tones pinged from the tiny console as he worked the controls, a frown creasing his lips. Adelaide sat in a chair next to him, hemming a pair of uniform pants.

'I hate this game!' the boy moaned.

'Then why do you play it?' Adelaide guided the needle into the fabric.

'Because I want to win.'

Hudson bent forward, punching the buttons with fervor."

from page 100 of A Sound Among the Trees by Susan Meissner

9letterpress
marraskuu 5, 2011, 6:49pm

"The wig didn't itch (my wigs don't itch, Todd had said, calm as God) but the make-up caused mild claustrophobia."

The Last Werewolf by Glen Duncan, page 100

10rainpebble
marraskuu 5, 2011, 6:55pm

'If we 'plain of absence what shall we say? * Or if pain afflict us where wend our way?
An I hire a truchman to tell my tale * the lovers' plaint is not told for pay:
If I put on patience, a lover's life * After loss of love will not last a day :
Naught is left me now but regret, repine * And tears flooding cheeks for ever and aye:
O thou who the babes of these eyes hast fled * Thou art homed in heart that shall never stray;
Would heaven I wot hast thou kept our pact * Long as stream shall flow, to have firmest fay?
Or hast forgotten the weeping slave * Whom groans afflict and whom griefs waylay?
Ah, when severance ends and we side by side * Couch, I'll blame thy rigours and chide thy pride!

from page 100 of The Arabian Nights: A Thousand Nights and a Night

11skittles
marraskuu 5, 2011, 8:02pm

She had seen him six months ago, in Verona. Their eyes met across the Piazza dei Signoria. They were both pretending to be Italian. France held the city, but matters were complicated by the Austrian Army marching about the countryside trying to take it back, and the Veronese hated all foreigners equally, which was not unreasonable of them. She and Hawker had both deemed it prudent to turn in the opposite direction and walk away.

From page 100 of The Black Hawk by Joanna Bourne

12clue
Muokkaaja: marraskuu 5, 2011, 8:25pm

Sally knew Van der Vries's mind as she'd known Lucas's. Her husband, God help her, intended to kill the baby the moment it left her body. She knew, too, that she would defeat them both. Her child would live. The answer lay in the practice of her craft.

From page 100 of City of Dreams: A Novel of Nieuw Amsterdam and Early Manhattan by Beverly Swerling

13rainpebble
marraskuu 5, 2011, 10:58pm

"Here (Lolo Canyon) another body of soldiers came upon us and demanded our surrender. We refused. They said, "You can not get by us." We answered, "We are going by you without fighting if you will let us, but we are going by you anyhow." We then made a treaty with these soldiers. We agreed not to molest any one and they agreed that we might pass through the Bitter Root country in peace and traded stock with white men there.
We understood that there was to be no war. We intended to go peaceably to the buffalo country, and leave the question of returning to our country to be settled afterward"

A quote from Chief Joseph found on page 101 of I Will Fight No More Forever by Merrill D Beal.

14Jacksonian
marraskuu 6, 2011, 12:20am

Those imported deomesticates may be thought of as "founder" crops and animals, because they founded local food production. The arrival of founder domesticates enabled local people to become sedentary, and thereby increased the likelihood of local crops' evolving from wild plants that were gathered, brought home and planted accidentally, and later planted intentionally.

From page 100 of Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond. (The only two complete sentences on the page.)

15rainpebble
marraskuu 6, 2011, 12:38am

I find it very disconcerting to read those extremely long sentences and frequently get myself lost within them so kudos to you Jill.

16Cariola
marraskuu 6, 2011, 11:10am

Ayub stubs the bidi in the unconscious girl's navel, crushing it in deep. An umbilical braid of white smoke grows out of her. He walks between Qasim and Saif, and they part for him, as he intends them to do. Ayub is pleased with his gesture, stubbing the bidi like that and striding between them. He dwells on it for part of the drive, how cold and hard and in command he must have come off to everyone. But the feeling wears off, and he goes back to brooding on the four hundred rupees he left by the roadside.

(From page 170 of Partitions by Amit Majmudar.)

17PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 6, 2011, 11:22am

It was November, that quiet, gray time of the year when you feel like holding someone's hand.

from page 70 of Local Girls by Alice Hoffman (page 100 is blank so I chose my favorite)

18rainpebble
Muokkaaja: marraskuu 6, 2011, 2:03pm

Alice Hoffman is my favorite female contemporary author PbP. I am so happy to see that someone else
loves her too. I have been reading her for many a year and must make stretches out between her reads as I am so tempted to go from one to another straight away. There are only two of hers that I haven't read and I am trying so hard to hold off on them.
Glad to see you are enjoying Local Girls. It was a 5 star read for me and my review is here:

http://www.librarything.com/work/46436

from 4/16/2009

Back on topic:

"Twice my mother asked me how school had been that day, but I knew neither time she heard my response."

from page 100 of Midwives by Chris Bohjalian

19rainpebble
marraskuu 6, 2011, 3:32pm

"We had a whole crowd of healthy men with little to do. "What a nuisance," said my mother, of the relentless presence of her sons."

From page 100 of The Red Tent

20rainpebble
marraskuu 7, 2011, 5:28am

"Bertha Vick reported that Friday night at about 2 A.M. in the morning, she went to the bathroom and was bitten by a gopher rat that had come up through the pipes and into her toilet. She said she ran and woke up Harold, who did not believe her, but he went in and looked, and sure enough, there it was swimming around in the toilet."
"My other half said that the floods must have been the reason it came up through the pipes. Bertha said she did not care what caused it, that she would always be sure to look before she sat down anywhere."
"Harold is having the gopher rat stuffed".

from page 100 of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe.

I about peed myself I was laughing so hard at this; especially when Harold is going to stuff the gopher rat. Love, love, love this book!~!

21calm
marraskuu 7, 2011, 5:42am

"We worked a trade to educate one another. He read to me until eventually I learned to make out the words. Our favourite book was Pride and Prejudice. I liked that little white girl, Elizabeth Bennet, because she had wit and a backbone. I thought she would have made a good Sioux. In return I told him all the stories and legends about where he came from."

From page 102 of The Grass Dancer as I preferred it to anything on page 100:)

22PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 7, 2011, 6:19pm

I love Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe! Good to hear you are enjoying it as well rainpebble.

23PaperbackPirate
marraskuu 7, 2011, 6:37pm

21 calm
Your quote intrigued me enough to add Grass Dancer to my wishlist! Thank you!

24rainpebble
marraskuu 7, 2011, 9:36pm

"Now," said Lady Tameson, "write that I hereby revoke all previous wills"--she gave a dry chuckle--"You see I learned the jargon from that pompous fellow from London. I Tameson Barrata revoke all previous wills and declare this to be my last one. Arthur Mallinson to be my trustee as before, but I bequeath everything, put a line under everything, there's to be no mistake about it, to my great-niece Flora. There! Write it."

from page 100 of Winterwood by Dorothy Eden