Kirjailijakuva

Flora Warren Seymour (1888–1948)

Teoksen Sacagawea: American Pathfinder tekijä

20 teosta 814 jäsentä 6 arvostelua

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Yleistieto

Kanoninen nimi
Seymour, Flora Warren
Syntymäaika
1888
Kuolinaika
1948
Sukupuoli
female
Kansalaisuus
USA
Asuinpaikat
Chicago, Illinois, USA
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Washington, D.C., USA
Koulutus
George Washington University (BA 1906)
Washington College of Law (LL.B 1915)
Kent College of Law (Chicago; LL.M - 1916)
Ammatit
attorney
Suhteet
Seymour, George Steele (husband)
Organisaatiot
Board of Indian Commissioners
Lyhyt elämäkerta
Flora Warren Seymour was a Chicago attorney. She was appointed as the first woman member of the Board of Indian Commissioners. Flora Warren was born in Cleveland, Ohio, but spent her school days in Washington, D. C. She was working for the United States government at the time of her marriage to George Steele Seymour in 1915, who is also a writer. With her husband she helped found the Order of Bookfellows, and publish and edit the monthly magazine, The Step-Ladder. Seymour received A. B , LL. B., and LL. M. degrees and was admitted to the bar of Illinois in 1915 and of the United States Supreme Court in 1919. [source: The Sheboyany Press (Wisconsin), May 21, 1931, p. 23][Seymour, in another Sheboyan Press news article, date Sept. 14, 1929, is referred to an an "authoress, lawyer and poet."][To date, we have found no additional evidence that Seymour was a poet.]

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Merkitty asiattomaksi
Linyarai | 4 muuta kirja-arvostelua | Feb 16, 2020 |
Written in 1929, when the nearly continual Indian wars and treaties were still very much in the minds of everyone in the United States. This is a history of the Indians and the Europeans who came to America and intermingled with them.

Warren tells the tale of the Algonquins and the Iriquois first, the huge eastern tribes that were first encountered. When the British and French fought, tne Indians fought along with them, on both sides. The Indians who joined the British were on the losing side, and suffered for it, mainly because their Indian foes had been on the winning side.

The Europeans kept coming in, and the Indians were continually promised lines beyond which would be theirs forever. Those lines kept marching westward, and Warren describes all the various Indian tribes whose lands increasingly were on the wrong side of those lines and had to move or fight.

What I really liked about this book is that it treats the Indians as equals in heart and courage and fighting ability, but outnumbered. Grossly outnumbered. The Indians rapidly took to guns and flour and butter of the Europeans, but the settled farming life not so much. Dozens upon dozens of tribes are spoken of and described in their wonderful diversity, a diversity that has been whitewashed from the minds of modern people and the treatments in modern books.
… (lisätietoja)
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Merkitty asiattomaksi
br77rino | Nov 9, 2019 |

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Tilastot

Teokset
20
Jäseniä
814
Suosituimmuussija
#31,349
Arvio (tähdet)
3.9
Kirja-arvosteluja
6
ISBN:t
14

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