Picture of author.

Fanny Kemble (1809–1893)

Teoksen Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 tekijä

26+ Works 362 Jäsentä 6 arvostelua

About the Author

Image credit: From "Records of a Girlhood" by Frances Anne Kemble

Tekijän teokset

Fanny Kemble's Journals (2000) 50 kappaletta
Records of a Girlhood (1878) 11 kappaletta
Records of later life (1882) 4 kappaletta
JOURNAL (2009) 2 kappaletta

Associated Works

The Assassin's Cloak: An Anthology of the World's Greatest Diarists (2000) — Avustaja, eräät painokset544 kappaletta
Writing New York: A Literary Anthology (1998) — Avustaja — 274 kappaletta
Poems Between Women (1997) — Avustaja — 89 kappaletta
Nineteenth-Century Women Poets: An Oxford Anthology (1996) — Avustaja — 22 kappaletta
Across the North Atlantic in Sailing Packet Days (1973) — Avustaja — 4 kappaletta

Merkitty avainsanalla

Yleistieto

Muut nimet
Kemble, Frances Anne (birth)
Butler, F. A.
Syntymäaika
1809-11-27
Kuolinaika
1893-01-15
Hautapaikka
Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England, UK
Sukupuoli
female
Kansalaisuus
UK
Syntymäpaikka
London, England, UK
Kuolinpaikka
London, England, UK
Ammatit
activist
writer
playwright
memoirist
public speaker
Suhteet
Hatton, Ann Julia (aunt)
Kemble, Adelaide (sibling)
Leigh, Frances Butler (child)
Wister, Sarah Butler (child)
Wister, Owen (grandchild)
Lyhyt elämäkerta
Frances Anne "Fanny" Kemble was born into the First Family of the British theatre. Her parents were the actors Charles Kemble and his wife Maria Theresa Kemble, and Sarah Siddons was her aunt. Fanny was educated in France and made her own stage debut in 1829 at Covent Garden in London, where she was a smash hit in the role of Shakespeare's Juliet. Fanny became an icon of the British stage and achieved international stardom on her 1832 tour of the East Coast of the USA. In 1834, she married Pierce Mease Butler, an American planter and politician, and retired from her theatrical career. She then became a best-selling author when her "Journal by Frances Anne Butler" appeared in 1835. The book scandalized American readers with her frank opinions about her adopted country. In 1847, Fanny separated from her husband and returned to the stage to make a living. She had great success as a Shakespearean reader rather than acting in plays, and toured the country. She and her husband divorced in 1849; Butler kept custody of their two daughters and Fanny was not allowed to see them until they each reached age 21. Fanny was an outspoken abolitionist. She wrote "Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839," an account of life on her husband's plantations in the Sea Islands, with passionate commentary against slavery. It could not be published until after the start of the Civil War, for fear of Butler's reaction and alienating her daughters. Fanny continued to tour until her death in 1893 in London.

Jäseniä

Kirja-arvosteluja

Important reading.

How on earth could the slave owners and overseers not realize that in listening to the complaints of the slaves, this woman was actually doing the owners themselves a favor -rather than increasing discontent, listening gave an outlet to those slaves who confided in her, thus actually decreasing their discontent by making them feel heard, and actually adding years to the lives of the masters and overseers. Had the slaves not felt listened to, they might have slit the throats of all the white men on the plantation, despite (or because of) the repressive conditions. How on earth could they not realize that their very deafness and blindness to their cruelty increased the risk of revolt? Discontent penned up boils over, as the Great Depression showed (which was why we got Social Security, Medica* and Welfare -that, and the fact that FDR did not want the Japanese using segregation and Bread Lines as bad P.R. against US...).

Courage, and hope against hope.
In Service to Community,
MEOW Date: 27 August 12,014 H.E. (Holocene/Human Era)
… (lisätietoja)
 
Merkitty asiattomaksi
ShiraDest | 1 muu arvostelu | Mar 6, 2019 |
Fanny Kemble was a very famous 19th century British actress and author who traveled the world, married one of her groupies who inherited a plantation with hundreds of slaves, divorced him and became an outspoken advocate of abolition. She belonged to a theatrical family; her father, aunt and uncle were famous actors and her sister was an opera singer. Fanny kept extensive journals commenting on everything. Her diary [b:Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|9844407|Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|Frances Anne Kemble|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41eOmqx7TnL._SL75_.jpg|14735237] was published before the Civil War, she spoke against slavery and donated money to the abolitionist movement.

Rather than read one of the biographies like [b:Fanny Kemble's Civil War|220087|Fanny Kemble's Civil War|Catherine Clinton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172807759s/220087.jpg|2290419], I thought that I would go straight to the source and read her journals. I expected her to write in a Victorian style so that wasn't a surprise but every couple of pages she goes off on some tangent. She would see a sunrise and then go on and on about it actually saying nothing at all. Three more pages of substance and then a page on the moonlight, two pages on ocean waves, a page on rose petals. After a while these "spells" got so boring that when I recognized the beginning of one of them I would skip a page.

Although her memoirs were published many years after they were written, the author blanked out all the names of people. All men, except her father and a couple of famous people who were mentioned in passing (like Lord Byron and presidents of the U.S.) were called Mr.---- and all women were Miss---- or Mrs.----. So it was impossible to keep track of who was present or who was speaking. So many paragraphs look like: Mr. and Mrs.---- joined us for dinner but Mr.---- declined our invitation. Mr.---- brought me a nosegay. Mr.---- sang for us. As he was leaving Mr.---- invited me to go riding but father and I had a prior appointment with Mr.----."

Fanny Kemble lived an intense and interesting life but, unless you have a specific interest in reading her journals as she wrote them, I would recommend reading an edited version like Catherine Clinton's [b:Fanny Kemble's Journals|1042570|Fanny Kemble's Journals|Fanny Kemble|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1180458972s/1042570.jpg|1028971]
… (lisätietoja)
 
Merkitty asiattomaksi
R0BIN | 1 muu arvostelu | Apr 27, 2013 |
Fanny Kemble was a very famous 19th century British actress and author who traveled the world, married one of her groupies who inherited a plantation with hundreds of slaves, divorced him and became an outspoken advocate of abolition. She belonged to a theatrical family; her father, aunt and uncle were famous actors and her sister was an opera singer. Fanny kept extensive journals commenting on everything. Her diary [b:Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|9844407|Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839|Frances Anne Kemble|http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41eOmqx7TnL._SL75_.jpg|14735237] was published before the Civil War, she spoke against slavery and donated money to the abolitionist movement.

Rather than read one of the biographies like [b:Fanny Kemble's Civil War|220087|Fanny Kemble's Civil War|Catherine Clinton|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1172807759s/220087.jpg|2290419], I thought that I would go straight to the source and read her journals. I expected her to write in a Victorian style so that wasn't a surprise but every couple of pages she goes off on some tangent. She would see a sunrise and then go on and on about it actually saying nothing at all. Three more pages of substance and then a page on the moonlight, two pages on ocean waves, a page on rose petals. After a while these "spells" got so boring that when I recognized the beginning of one of them I would skip a page.

Although her memoirs were published many years after they were written, the author blanked out all the names of people. All men, except her father and a couple of famous people who were mentioned in passing (like Lord Byron and presidents of the U.S.) were called Mr.---- and all women were Miss---- or Mrs.----. So it was impossible to keep track of who was present or who was speaking. So many paragraphs look like: Mr. and Mrs.---- joined us for dinner but Mr.---- declined our invitation. Mr.---- brought me a nosegay. Mr.---- sang for us. As he was leaving Mr.---- invited me to go riding but father and I had a prior appointment with Mr.----."

Fanny Kemble lived an intense and interesting life but, unless you have a specific interest in reading her journals as she wrote them, I would recommend reading an edited version like Catherine Clinton's [b:Fanny Kemble's Journals|1042570|Fanny Kemble's Journals|Fanny Kemble|http://photo.goodreads.com/books/1180458972s/1042570.jpg|1028971]
… (lisätietoja)
 
Merkitty asiattomaksi
R0BIN | 1 muu arvostelu | Apr 27, 2013 |
Fanny Kemble was a very famous 19th century British actress and author who traveled the world, married one of her groupies who inherited a plantation with hundreds of slaves, divorced him and became an outspoken advocate of abolition. She belonged to a theatrical family; her father, aunt and uncle were famous actors and her sister was an opera singer. Fanny kept extensive journals commenting on everything. Her diary Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation 1838-1839 was published before the Civil War, she spoke against slavery and donated money to the abolitionist movement.

I should have read one of the biographies either instead of or before reading her memoirs. Although these letters were published many years after they were written, the author blanked out most of the names. For example, letters are addressed to "Dear H----" so I don't know if that is Harriet or some other person whose name starts with H. And in the letters she refers to people as Mr.----- and Miss---- which leaves me in the dark.

The letters are not in chronological order. The book starts with letters written in 1874 and most of the books seems to cover 1874-1876. The earlier period seems to be relatively few letters towards the end of the book and some letters are undated.
… (lisätietoja)
 
Merkitty asiattomaksi
R0BIN | Apr 27, 2013 |

Listat

You May Also Like

Associated Authors

Tilastot

Teokset
26
Also by
7
Jäseniä
362
Suosituimmuussija
#66,319
Arvio (tähdet)
4.0
Kirja-arvosteluja
6
ISBN:t
51

Taulukot ja kaaviot